• The Massive Young star-forming Complex Study in Infrared and X-rays (MYStIX) project requires samples of young stars that are likely members of 20 nearby Galactic massive star-forming regions. Membership is inferred from statistical classification of X-ray sources, from detection of a robust infrared excess that is best explained by circumstellar dust in a disk or infalling envelope, and from published spectral types that are unlikely to be found among field stars. We present the MYStIX membership lists here, and describe in detail the statistical classification of X-ray sources via a \Naive Bayes Classi
  • With a uniform VLT SINFONI data set of nine targets, we have developed an empirical grid of J,H,K spectra of the atmospheres of objects estimated to have very low substellar masses of \sim5-20 MJup and young ages of \sim1-50 Myr. Most of the targets are companions, objects which are especially valuable for comparison with atmosphere and evolutionary models, as they present rare cases in which the age is accurately known from the primary. Based on the sample youth, all objects are expected to have low surface gravity, and this study investigates the critical early phases of the evolution of substellar objects. The spectra are compared with grids of five different theoretical atmosphere models. This analysis represents the first systematic model comparison with infrared spectra of young brown dwarfs. The fits to the full JHK spectra of each object result in a range of best fit effective temperatures of +/-150-300K whether or not the full model grid or a subset restricted to lower log(g) values is used. This effective temperature range is significantly larger than the uncertainty typically assigned when using a single model grid. Fits to a single wavelength band can vary by up to 1000K using the different models. Since the overall shape of these spectra is governed more by the temperature than surface gravity, unconstrained model fits did not find matches with low surface gravity or a trend in log(g) with age. This suggests that empirical comparison with spectra of unambiguously young objects targets (such as these SINFONI data) may be the most reliable method to search for indications of low surface gravity and youth. For two targets, the SINFONI data are a second epoch and the data show no variations in morphology over time. The analysis of two other targets, AB Pic B and CT Cha B, suggests that these objects may have lower temperatures, and consequently lower masses, than previously estimated.
  • (abridged) We investigate the properties of young stars and their disks in the NGC 6357 complex, concentrating on the most massive star cluster within the complex: Pismis 24. We discover two new young clusters in the NGC 6357 complex. We give a revised distance estimate for Pismis 24 of 1.7+-0.2 kpc. We find that the massive star Pis 24-18 is a binary system, with the secondary being the main X-ray source of the pair. We derive the cluster mass function and find that up to the completeness limit at low masses it agrees well with the IMF of the Trapezium cluster. We derive a median age of 1 Myr for the Pismis 24 cluster members. We find five proplyds in HST archival imaging of the cluster, four of which are newly found. In all cases the proplyd tails are pointing directly away from the massive star system Pis 24-1. One proplyd shows a second tail, pointing away from Pis 24-2, suggesting this object is being photoevaporated from two directions simultaneously. We find that the global disk frequency (~30%) in Pismis 24 is much lower than some other clusters of similar age, such as the Orion Nebula Cluster. When comparing the disk frequencies in 19 clusters/star-forming regions of various ages and different (massive) star content, we find that the disks in clusters harboring extremely massive stars (typically earlier than O5), like Pismis 24, are dissipated roughly twice as quickly as in clusters/star-forming regions without extremely massive stars. Within Pismis 24, we find that the disk frequency within a projected distance of 0.6 pc from Pis 24-1 is substantially lower than at larger radii (~19% vs. ~37%). We argue for a combination of photoevaporation and irradiation with ionizing UV photons from nearby massive stars, causing increased MRI-induced turbulence and associated accretion activity, to play an important role in the dissipation of low-mass star disks in Pismis 24.
  • Dynamical interactions between planets and debris disks may sculpt the disk structure and impact planetary orbits, but only a few systems with both imaged planets and spatially resolved debris disks are known. With the Caltech Submm Observatory (CSO), we have observed the HR 8799 debris disk at 350{\mu}m. The 350{\mu}m map is the first spatially resolved measurement of the debris disk encircling the HR 8799 planetary system at this wavelength. Both the flux and size of the emission are consistent with a Kuiper belt of dust extending from ~100-300 AU. Although the resolution of the current map is limited, the map shows an indication of offset asymmetric emission, and several scenarios for this possibility are explored with radiative transfer calculations of a star-disk system and N-body numerical simulations of planet-disk interactions with parameters representative of the HR 8799 system.
  • We present preliminary astrometric results for the closest known brown dwarf binary to the Sun: Epsilon Indi Ba, Bb at a distance of 3.626 pc. Via ongoing monitoring of the relative separation of the two brown dwarfs (spectral types T1 and T6) with the VLT NACO near-IR adaptive optics system since June 2004, we obtain a model-independent dynamical total mass for the system of 121 MJup, some 60% larger than the one obtained by McCaughrean et al. (2004), implying that the system may be as old as 5 Gyr. We have also been monitoring the absolute astrometric motions of the system using the VLT FORS2 optical imager since August 2005 to determine the individual masses. We predict a periastron passage in early 2010, by which time the system mass will be constrained to < 1 MJup and we will be able to determine the individual masses accurately in a dynamical, model-independent manner.