• A Neutrino Factory where neutrinos of all species are produced in equal quantities by muon decay is described as a facility at the intensity frontier for exquisite precision providing ideal conditions for ultimate neutrino studies and the ideal complement to Long Baseline Facilities like LBNF at Fermilab. It is foreseen to be built in stages with progressively increasing complexity and performance, taking advantage of existing or proposed facilities at an existing laboratory like Fermilab. A tentative layout based on a recirculating linac providing opportunities for considerable saving is discussed as well as its possible evolution toward a muon collider if and when requested by Physics. Tentative parameters of the various stages are presented as well as the necessary R&D to address the technological issues and demonstrate their feasibility.
  • Turning the current experimental plasma accelerator state-of-the-art from a promising technology into mainstream scientific tools depends critically on high-performance, high-fidelity modeling of complex processes that develop over a wide range of space and time scales. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Exascale Computing Project, a team from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in collaboration with teams from SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is developing a new plasma accelerator simulation tool that will harness the power of future exascale supercomputers for high-performance modeling of plasma accelerators. We present the various components of the codes such as the new Particle-In-Cell Scalable Application Resource (PICSAR) and the redesigned adaptive mesh refinement library AMReX, which are combined with redesigned elements of the Warp code, in the new WarpX software. The code structure, status, early examples of applications and plans are discussed.
  • This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available currently. 2) The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability, of both facilities and researchers, to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. 3) Data rates and volumes from HEP experimental facilities are also straining the ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. 4) A close integration of HPC simulation and data analysis will aid greatly in interpreting results from HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. 5) Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP's research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources the experimental HEP program needs a) an established long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, b) an ability to map workflows onto HPC resources, c) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations that can have thousands of individual members, d) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR facilities, e) to build up and train a workforce capable of developing and using simulations and analysis to support HEP scientific research on next-generation systems.
  • A staged approach towards muon based facilities for Intensity and Energy Frontier science, building upon existing and proposed facilities at Fermilab, is presented. At each stage, a facility exploring new physics also provides an R&D platform to validate the technology needed for subsequent stages. The envisioned program begins with nuSTORM, a sensitive sterile neutrino search which also provides precision neutrino cross-section measurements while developing the technology of using and cooling muons. A staged Neutrino Factory based upon Project X, sending beams towards the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), which will house the LBNE detector, could follow for detailed exploration of neutrino properties at the Intensity Frontier, while also establishing the technology of using intense bunched muon beams. The complex could then evolve towards Muon Colliders, starting at 126 GeV with measurements of the Higgs resonance to sub-MeV precision, and continuing to multi-TeV colliders for the exploration of physics beyond the Standard Model at the Energy Frontier. An Appendix addresses specific questions raised by the Lepton Colliders subgroup of the CSS2013 Frontier Capabilities Study Group.