• It is a long-standing dream of scientists to capture the ultra-fast dynamics of molecular or chemical reactions in real time and to make a molecular movie. With free-electron lasers delivering extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light at unprecedented intensities, in combination with pump-probe schemes, it is now possible to visualize structural changes on the femtosecond time scale in photo-excited molecules. In hydrocarbons the absorption of a single photon may trigger the migration of a hydrogen atom within the molecule. Here, such a reaction was filmed in acetylene molecules (C2H2) showing a partial migration of one of the protons along the carbon backbone which is consistent with dynamics calculations on ab initio potential energy surfaces. Our approach opens attractive perspectives and potential applications for a large variety of XUV-induced ultra-fast phenomena in molecules relevant to physics, chemistry, and biology.
  • We have investigated multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics of argon and xenon atoms using a new x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility, SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron LAser (SACLA) in Japan, and identified that highly charged Xe ions with the charge state up to +26 are produced predominantly via four-photon absorption as well as highly charged Ar ions with the charge state up to +10 are produced via two-photon absorption at a photon energy of 5.5 keV. The absolute fluence of the XFEL pulse, needed for comparison between theory and experiment, has been determined using two-photon processes in the argon atom with the help of benchmark ab initio calculations. Our experimental results, in combination with a newly developed theoretical model for heavy atoms, demonstrate the occurrence of multiphoton absorption involving deep inner shells.
  • Two anomalously weak transitions within the $2 ^3{\rm S}_1~-~3 ^3{\rm P}_J$ manifolds in $^3$He have been identified. Their transition strengths are measured to be 1,000 times weaker than that of the strongest transition in the same group. This dramatic suppression of transition strengths is due to the dominance of the hyperfine interaction over the fine structure interaction. An alternative selection rule based on \textit{IS}-coupling (where the nuclear spin is first coupled to the total electron spin) is proposed. This provides qualitative understanding of the transition strengths. It is shown that the small deviations from the \textit{IS}-coupling model are fully accounted for by an exact diagonalization of the strongly interacting states.