• White dwarf WD 1145+017 is orbited by several clouds of dust, possibly emanating from actively disintegrating bodies. These dust clouds reveal themselves through deep, broad, and evolving transits in the star's light curve. Here, we report two epochs of multi-wavelength photometric observations of WD 1145+017, including several filters in the optical, K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m bands in 2016 and 2017. The observed transit depths are different at these wavelengths. However, after correcting for excess dust emission at K$_\mathrm{s}$ and 4.5 $\mu$m, we find the transit depths for the white dwarf itself are the same at all wavelengths, at least to within the observational uncertainties of $\sim$5%-10%. From this surprising result, and under the assumption of low optical depth dust clouds, we conclude that there is a deficit of small particles (with radii $s \lesssim$ 1.5 $\mu$m) in the transiting material. We propose a model wherein only large particles can survive the high equilibrium temperature environment corresponding to 4.5 hr orbital periods around WD 1145+017, while small particles sublimate rapidly. In addition, we evaluate dust models that are permitted by our measurements of infrared emission.
  • The multi-planetary system HD 106315 was recently found in K2 data . The planets have periods of $P_b \sim9.55$ and $P_c \sim 21.06\,$days, and radii of $ r_b = 2.44 \pm 0.17\, $ and $r_c = 4.35 \pm 0.23\, $ $R_{\oplus}$. The brightness of the host star (V=9.0 mag) makes it an excellent target for transmission spectroscopy. However, to interpret transmission spectra it is crucial to measure the planetary masses. We obtained high precision radial velocities for HD~106315 to determine the mass of the two transiting planets discovered with Kepler K2. Our successful observation strategy was carefully tailored to mitigate the effect of stellar variability. We modelled the new radial velocity data together with the K2 transit photometry and a new ground-based partial transit of HD 106315c to derive system parameters. We estimate the mass of HD 106315b to be 12.6 $\pm$ 3.2 $M_{\oplus}$ and the density to be $4.7 \pm 1.7\, g\,cm^{-3}$, while for HD 106315c we estimate a mass of 15.2 $\pm$ 3.7 $M_{\oplus}$ and a density of $1.01 \pm 0.29\, $g\,cm$^{-3}$. Hence, despite planet c having a radius almost twice as large as planet b, their masses are consistent with one another. We conclude that HD 106315c has a thick hydrogen-helium gaseous envelope. A detailed investigation of HD 106315b using a planetary interior model constrains the core mass fraction to be 5-29\%, and the water mass fraction to be 10-50\%. An alternative, not considered by our model, is that HD 106315b is composed of a large rocky core with a thick H-He envelope. Transmission spectroscopy of these planets will give insight into their atmospheric compositions and also help constrain their core compositions.
  • We present the discovery of EPIC 228735255b, a P= 6.57 days Jupiter-mass (M$_P$=1.019$\pm$0.070 M$_{Jup}$) planet transiting a V=12.5 (G5-spectral type) star in an eccentric orbit (e=$0.120^{+0.056}_{-0.046}$) detected using a combination of K2 photometry and ground-based observations. With a radius of 1.095$\pm$0.018R$_{Jup}$ the planet has a bulk density of 0.726$\pm$0.062$\rho_{Jup}$. The host star has a [Fe/H] of 0.12$\pm$0.045, and from the K2 light curve we find a rotation period for the star of 16.3$\pm$0.1 days. This discovery is the 9th hot Jupiter from K2 and highlights K2's ability to detect transiting giant planets at periods slightly longer than traditional, ground-based surveys. This planet is slightly inflated, but much less than others with similar incident fluxes. These are of interest for investigating the inflation mechanism of hot Jupiters.
  • We present multi-wavelength photometric monitoring of WD 1145+017, a white dwarf exhibiting periodic dimming events interpreted to be the transits of orbiting, disintegrating planetesimals. Our observations include the first set of near-infrared light curves for the object, obtained on multiple nights over the span of one month, and recorded multiple transit events with depths varying between ~20 to 50 per cent. Simultaneous near-infrared and optical observations of the deepest and longest duration transit event were obtained on two epochs with the Anglo-Australian Telescope and three optical facilities, over the wavelength range of 0.5 to 1.2 microns. These observations revealed no measurable difference in transit depths for multiple photometric pass bands, allowing us to place a 2 sigma lower limit of 0.8 microns on the grain size in the putative transiting debris cloud. This conclusion is consistent with the spectral energy distribution of the system, which can be fit with an optically thin debris disc with minimum particle sizes of 10 +5/-3 microns.
  • We report the discovery of EPIC201702477b, a transiting brown dwarf in a long period (40.73691 +/- 0.00037 day) and eccentric (e=0.2281 +/- 0.0026) orbit. This system was initially reported as a planetary candidate based on two transit events seen in K2 Campaign 1 photometry and later validated as an exoplanet. We confirm the transit and refine the ephemeris with two subsequent ground-based detections of the transit using the LCOGT 1m telescope network. We rule out any transit timing variations above the level of 30s. Using high precision radial velocity measurements from HARPS and SOPHIE we identify the transiting companion as a brown dwarf with a mass, radius, and bulk density of 66.9 +/- 1.7 M$_J$, 0.757 +/- 0.065 R$_J$, and 191+/-51 g.cm$^{-3}$ respectively. EPIC201702477b is the smallest radius brown dwarf yet discovered, with a mass just below the H-burning limit. It has the highest density of any planet, substellar mass object or main-sequence star discovered so far. We find evidence in the set of known transiting brown dwarfs for two populations of objects - high mass brown dwarfs and low mass brown dwarfs. The higher-mass population have radii in very close agreement to theoretical models, and show a lower-mass limit around 60 M$_J$. This may be the signature of mass-dependent ejection of systems during the formation process.
  • We use the currently most complete collection of reliable Cepheid positions (565 stars) out to ~5 kpc based mostly on our photometric data to outline the spiral pattern of our Galaxy. We find the pitch-angle to be equal to 9--10 degrees with the most accurate estimate (i=9.5 +/-0.1 degrees) obtained assuming that the spiral pattern has a four-armed structure, and the solar phase angle in the spiral pattern to be chi_0 = 121+/-3 degrees. The pattern speed is found to be Omega_P=25.2+/-0.5km/s/kpc based on a comparison of the positions of the spiral arms delineated by Cepheids and maser sources and the age difference between these objects.
  • We use UCAC4 proper motions and WISE W1-band apparent magnitudes intensity-mean for almost 400 field RR Lyrae variables to determine the parameters of the velocity distribution of Galactic RR Lyrae population and constrain the zero points of the metallicity-<MV> relation and those of the period-metallicity-<MKs>-band and period-metallicity-<MW1>-band luminosity relations via statistical parallax. We find the mean velocities of the halo- and thick-disc RR Lyrae populations in the solar neighbourhood to be (U0(Halo), V0(Halo), W0(Halo)) = (-7 +/- 9, -214 +/- 10, -10 +/- 6) km/s and (U0(Disc), V0(Disc), W0(Disc)) =(-13 +/- 7, -37 +/- 6, -17 +/- 4) km/s, respectively, and the corresponding components of the velocity-dispersion ellipsoids, (sigma VR(Halo), sigma Vphi(Halo), sigma Vtheta(Halo)) = (153 +/- 9, 101 +/- 6, 96 +/- 5) km/s and (sigma VR(Disc), sigma Vphi(Disc), sigma Vtheta(Disc)) = (46 +/- 7, 37 +/- 5, 27 +/- 4) km/s, respectively. The fraction of thick-disc stars is estimated at 0.22 +/- 0.03. The corrected IR period-metallicity-luminosity relations are <MKs> = -0.769 +0.088 [Fe/H]- 2.33 mathoprm log PF and <MW1> = -0.825 + 0.088 [Fe/H] -2.33 mathoprm log PF, and the optical metallicity-luminosity relation, [Fe/H]-<MV>, is <MV> = +1.094 + 0.232 [Fe/H], with a standard error of +/- 0.089, implying an LMC distance modulus of 18.32 +/- 0.09, a solar Galactocentric distance of 7.73 +/- 0.36 kpc, and the M31 and M33 distance moduli of DM(M31) = 24.24 +/- 0.09 (D = 705 +/- 30 kpc) and DM(M33) = 24.36 +/- 0.09 (D = 745 +/- 31 kpc), respectively. Extragalactic distances calibrated with our RR Lyrae star luminosity scale imply a Hubble constant of ~80 km/s/Mpc. Our results suggest marginal prograde rotation for the population of halo RR Lyraes in the Milky Way.
  • We report on analysis of 308.3 hrs of high speed photometry targeting the pulsating DA white dwarf EC14012-1446. The data were acquired with the Whole Earth Telescope (WET) during the 2008 international observing run XCOV26. The Fourier transform of the light curve contains 19 independent frequencies and numerous combination frequencies. The dominant peaks are 1633.907, 1887.404, and 2504.897 microHz. Our analysis of the combination amplitudes reveals that the parent frequencies are consistent with modes of spherical degree l=1. The combination amplitudes also provide m identifications for the largest amplitude parent frequencies. Our seismology analysis, which includes 2004--2007 archival data, confirms these identifications, provides constraints on additional frequencies, and finds an average period spacing of 41 s. Building on this foundation, we present nonlinear fits to high signal-to-noise light curves from the SOAR 4.1m, McDonald 2.1m, and KPNO 2m telescopes. The fits indicate a time-averaged convective response timescale of 99.4 +/- 17 s, a temperature exponent 85 +/- 6.2 and an inclination angle of 32.9 +/- 3.2 degrees. We present our current empirical map of the convective response timescale across the DA instability strip.
  • Photometric data in the UBV(RI)c system have been acquired for 80 solar analog stars for which we have previously derived highly precise atmospheric parameters Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] using high resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. UBV and (RI)c data for 46 and 76 of these stars, respectively, are published for the first time. Combining our data with those from the literature, colors in the UBV(RI)c system, with ~0.01 mag precision, are now available for 112 solar analogs. Multiple linear regression is used to derive the solar colors from these photometric data and the spectroscopically derived Teff, log g, and [Fe/H] values. To minimize the impact of systematic errors in the model-dependent atmospheric parameters, we use only the data for the ten stars that most closely resemble our Sun, i.e., the solar twins, and derive the following solar colors: (B-V)=0.653+/-0.005, (U-B)=0.166+/-0.022, (V-R)=0.352+/-0.007, and (V-I)=0.702+/-0.010. These colors are consistent, within the 1 sigma errors, with those derived using the entire sample of 112 solar analogs. We also derive the solar colors using the relation between spectral line-depth ratios and observed stellar colors, i.e., with a completely model-independent approach, and without restricting the analysis to solar twins. We find: (B-V)=0.653+/-0.003, (U-B)=0.158+/-0.009, (V-R)=0.356+/-0.003, and (V-I)=0.701+/-0.003, in excellent agreement with the model-dependent analysis.
  • Nonradial pulsations in the primary white dwarfs of cataclysmic variables can now potentially allow us to explore the stellar interior of these accretors using stellar seismology. In this context, we conducted a multi-site campaign on the accreting pulsator SDSS J161033.64-010223.3 (V386 Ser) using seven observatories located around the world in May 2007 over a duration of 11 days. We report the best fit periodicities here, which were also previously observed in 2004, suggesting their underlying stability. Although we did not uncover a sufficient number of independent pulsation modes for a unique seismological fit, our campaign revealed that the dominant pulsation mode at 609s is an evenly spaced triplet. The even nature of the triplet is suggestive of rotational splitting, implying an enigmatic rotation period of about 4.8 days. There are two viable alternatives assuming the triplet is real: either the period of 4.8 days is representative of the rotation period of the entire star with implications for the angular momentum evolution of these systems, or it is perhaps an indication of differential rotation with a fast rotating exterior and slow rotation deeper in the star. Investigating the possibility that a changing period could mimic a triplet suggests that this scenario is improbable, but not impossible. Using time-series spectra acquired in May 2009, we determine the orbital period of SDSS J161033.64-010223.3 to be 83.8 +/- 2.9 min. Three of the observed photometric frequencies from our May 2007 campaign appear to be linear combinations of the 609s pulsation mode with the first harmonic of the orbital period at 41.5min. This is the first discovery of a linear combination between nonradial pulsation and orbital motion for a variable white dwarf.