• Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only few quasars have been reported at $z > 6.5$ ($<$800 Myr after the Big Bang). In this work, we present six additional $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 $z \gtrsim 6.5$ quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of $z\gtrsim$6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad CIV 1549\AA$\,$emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value $\sim$3$\times$ higher than a quasar sample at $z\sim$1; (2) we estimate the quasars' black hole masses (M$\rm_{BH}\sim$0.3$-$5 $\times$ 10$^{9}$ M$_{\odot}$) via modeling of the MgII 2798\AA$\,$emission line and rest-frame UV continuum; we find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with $\langle (L_{\mathrm{bol}}/L_{\mathrm{Edd}}) \rangle = 0.39$) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower$-$redshift, albeit with significant scatter ($0.4$ dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the FeII/MgII abundance ratio with cosmic time; (4) we derive near zone sizes; together with measurements for $z\sim6$ quasars from recent work, we confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [CII] 158 $\mu$m emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars, and provide new accurate redshifts and [CII]/infrared luminosities estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.
  • Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.6<z<6.7 that satisfy our selection criteria. Seventy-seven of these quasars have been discovered with PS1, and 63 of them are newly identified in this paper. We present composite spectra of the PS1 distant quasar sample. This sample spans a factor of ~20 in luminosity and shows a variety of emission line properties. The number of quasars at z>5.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.
  • Luminous distant quasars are unique probes of the high redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) and of the growth of massive galaxies and black holes in the early universe. Absorption due to neutral Hydrogen in the IGM makes quasars beyond a redshift of z~6.5 very faint in the optical $z$-band, thus locating quasars at higher redshifts require large surveys that are sensitive above 1 micron. We report the discovery of three new z>6.5 quasars, corresponding to an age of the universe of <850 Myr, selected as z-band dropouts in the Pan-STARRS1 survey. This increases the number of known z>6.5 quasars from 4 to 7. The quasars have redshifts of z=6.50, 6.52, and 6.66, and include the brightest z-dropout quasar reported to date, PSO J036.5078+03.0498 with M_1450=-27.4. We obtained near-infrared spectroscopy for the quasars and from the MgII line we estimate that the central black holes have masses between 5x10^8 and 4x10^9 M_sun, and are accreting close to the Eddington limit (L_Bol/L_Edd=0.13-1.2). We investigate the ionized regions around the quasars and find near zone radii of R_NZ=1.5-5.2 proper Mpc, confirming the trend of decreasing near zone sizes with increasing redshift found for quasars at 5.7<z<6.4. By combining R_NZ of the PS1 quasars with those of 5.7<z<7.1 quasars in the literature, we derive a luminosity corrected redshift evolution of R_NZ,corrected=(7.2+/-0.2)-(6.1+/-0.7)x(z-6) Mpc. However, the large spread in R_NZ in the new quasars implies a wide range in quasar ages and/or a large variation in the neutral Hydrogen fraction along different lines of sight.
  • High-redshift quasars are currently the only probes of the growth of supermassive black holes and potential tracers of structure evolution at early cosmic time. Here we present our candidate selection criteria from the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1 and follow-up strategy to discover quasars in the redshift range 5.7<z<6.2. With this strategy we discovered eight new 5.7<z<6.0 quasars, increasing the number of known quasars at z>5.7 by more than 10%. We additionally recovered 18 previously known quasars. The eight quasars presented here span a large range of luminosities (-27.3 < M_{1450} < -25.4; 19.6 < z_ps1 < 21.2) and are remarkably heterogeneous in their spectral features: half of them show bright emission lines whereas the other half show a weak or no Ly$\alpha$ emission line (25% with rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly$\alpha$ + Nv line lower than 15{\AA}). We find a larger fraction of weak-line emission quasars than in lower redshift studies. This may imply that the weak-line quasar population at the highest redshifts could be more abundant than previously thought. However, larger samples of quasars are needed to increase the statistical significance of this finding.
  • Luhman (2013) has reported the discovery of a brown dwarf binary system only 2.01+/-0.15 pc from the Sun. The binary is well-resolved with a projected separation of 1.5", and spectroscopic observations have identified the components as late-L and early-T dwarfs. The system exhibits several remarkable traits, including a "flux reversal", where the T dwarf is brighter over 0.9-1.3 micron but fainter at other wavelengths; and significant (~10%) short-period (~4.9 hr) photometric variability with a complex light curve. These observations suggest spatial variations in condensate cloud structure, which is known to evolve substantially across the L dwarf/T dwarf transition. Here we report preliminary results from a multi-site monitoring campaign aimed at probing the spectral and temporal properties of this source. Focusing on our spectroscopic observations, we report the first detections of NIR spectral variability, present detailed analysis of K I lines that confirm differences in condensate opacity between the components; and preliminary determinations of radial and rotational velocities based on high-resolution NIR spectroscopy.
  • In the cores of some galaxy clusters the hot intracluster plasma is dense enough that it should cool radiatively in the cluster's lifetime, leading to continuous "cooling flows" of gas sinking towards the cluster center, yet no such cooling flow has been observed. The low observed star formation rates and cool gas masses for these "cool core" clusters suggest that much of the cooling must be offset by astrophysical feedback to prevent the formation of a runaway cooling flow. Here we report X-ray, optical, and infrared observations of the galaxy cluster SPT-CLJ2344-4243 at z = 0.596. These observations reveal an exceptionally luminous (L_2-10 keV = 8.2 x 10^45 erg/s) galaxy cluster which hosts an extremely strong cooling flow (dM/dt = 3820 +/- 530 Msun/yr). Further, the central galaxy in this cluster appears to be experiencing a massive starburst (740 +/- 160 Msun/yr), which suggests that the feedback source responsible for preventing runaway cooling in nearby cool core clusters may not yet be fully established in SPT-CLJ2344-4243. This large star formation rate implies that a significant fraction of the stars in the central galaxy of this cluster may form via accretion of the intracluster medium, rather than the current picture of central galaxies assembling entirely via mergers.
  • We present the far-UV spectrum of the quasar HS1700+6416 taken with FUSE. This QSO provides the second line of sight with the HeII absorption resolved into a Ly alpha forest structure. Since HS1700+6416 is slightly less redshifted (z=2.72) than HE2347-4342, we only probe the post-reionization phase of HeII, seen in the evolution of the HeII opacity, which is consistent with a simple power law. The HeII/HI ratio eta is estimated using a line profile-fitting procedure and an apparent optical depth approach, respectively. The expected metal line absorption in the far-UV is taken into account as well as molecular absorption of galactic H_2. About 27% of the eta values are affected by metal line absorption. In order to investigate the applicability of the analysis methods, we create simple artificial spectra based on the statistical properties of the HI Ly alpha forest. The analysis of the artificial data demonstrates that the apparent optical depth method as well as the line profile-fitting procedure lead to confident results for restricted data samples only (12.0 < log N(HI) < 13.0). The reasons are saturation in the case of the apparent optical depth and thermal line widths in the case of the profile fits. Furthermore, applying the methods to the unrestricted data set may mimic a correlation between eta and the strength of the HI absorption. For the restricted data samples a scatter of 10 - 15% in eta would be expected even if the underlying value is constant. The observed scatter is significantly larger than expected, indicating that the intergalactic radiation background is indeed fluctuating. In the redshift range 2.58 < z < 2.72, where the data quality is best, we find eta ~ 100, suggesting a contribution of soft sources like galaxies to the UV background.
  • We present FUSE observations of the HeII Lyman alpha forest in the redshift range 2.3 < z < 2.7 towards HS1700+6416. Between October 2002 and February 2003, the brightness of the QSO increased by a factor 2. Therefore, with an exposure time of 203 ks during orbital night, the quality of the resulting spectrum is comparable to the HE2347-4342 data. This second line of sight with a resolved HeII Lyman alpha forest reveals a similar variation of several orders of magnitude of the column density ratio eta = N(HeII)/N(HI) and confirms the results of previous studies. The well-known metal line spectrum of HS1700+6416 permits to examine the influence of metal line absorption on the HeII column densities.