• We present VIRAC version 1, a near-infrared proper motion and parallax catalogue of the VISTA VVV survey for 312,587,642 unique sources averaged across all overlapping pawprint and tile images covering 560 deg$^2$ of the bulge of the Milky Way and southern disk. The catalogue includes 119 million high quality proper motion measurements, of which 47 million have statistical uncertainties below 1 mas yr$^{-1}$. In the 11$<K_s<$14 magnitude range the high quality motions have a median uncertainty of 0.67 mas yr$^{-1}$. The catalogue also includes 6,935 sources with quality-controlled 5 $\sigma$ parallaxes with a median uncertainty of 1.1 mas. The parallaxes show reasonable agreement with the TYCHO-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS), though caution is advised for data with modest significance. The SQL database housing the data is made available via the web. We give example applications for studies of Galactic structure, nearby objects (low mass stars and brown dwarfs, subdwarfs, white dwarfs) and kinematic distance measurements of YSOs. Nearby objects discovered include LTT 7251 B, an L7 benchmark companion to a G dwarf with over 20 published elemental abundances, a bright L sub-dwarf, VVV 1256-6202, with extremely blue colours and nine new members of the 25 pc sample. We also demonstrate why this catalogue remains useful in the era of Gaia. Future versions will be based on profile fitting photometry, use the Gaia absolute reference frame and incorporate the longer time baseline of the VVV extended survey (VVVX).
  • Aims. We investigate the maximum astrometric precision that can be reached on moving targets observed with digital-sensor arrays, and provide an estimate for its ultimate lower limit based on the Cram\'er-Rao bound. Methods. We extend previous work on one-dimensional Gaussian point-spread functions (PSFs) focusing on moving objects and extending the scope to two-dimensional array detectors. In this study the PSF of a stationary point-source celestial body is replaced by its convolution with a linear motion, thus effectively modeling the spread function of a moving target. Results. The expressions of the Cram\'er-Rao lower bound deduced by this method allow us to study in great detail the limit of astrometric precision that can be reached for moving celestial objects, and to compute an optimal exposure time according to different observational parameters such as seeing, detector pixel size, decentering, and elongation of the source caused by its drift. Comparison to simulated and real data shows that the predictions of our simple model are consistent with observations.
  • We use methods of differential astrometry to construct a small field inertial reference frame stable at the micro-arcsecond level. Such a high level of astrometric precision can be expected with the end-of-mission standard errors to be achieved with the Gaia space satellite using global astrometry. We harness Gaia measurements of field angles and look at the influence of the number of reference stars and the star's magnitude as well as astrometric systematics on the total error budget with the help of Gaia-like simulations around the Ecliptic Pole in a differential astrometric scenario. We find that the systematic errors are modeled and reliably estimated to the $\mu$as level even in fields with a modest number of 37 stars with G $<$13 mag over a 0.24 sq.degs. field of view for short time scales of the order of a day with high-cadence observations such as those around the North Ecliptic Pole during the EPSL scanning mode of Gaia for a perfect instrument. The inclusion of the geometric instrument model over such short time scales accounting for large-scale calibrations requires fainter stars down to G = 14 mag without diminishing the accuracy of the reference frame. We discuss several future perspectives of utilizing this methodology over different and longer timescales.
  • Gaia Data Release 1 (Gaia DR1) contains astrometric results for more than 1 billion stars brighter than magnitude 20.7 based on observations collected by the Gaia satellite during the first 14 months of its operational phase. We give a brief overview of the astrometric content of the data release and of the model assumptions, data processing, and validation of the results. For stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues, complete astrometric single-star solutions are obtained by incorporating positional information from the earlier catalogues. For other stars only their positions are obtained by neglecting their proper motions and parallaxes. The results are validated by an analysis of the residuals, through special validation runs, and by comparison with external data. Results. For about two million of the brighter stars (down to magnitude ~11.5) we obtain positions, parallaxes, and proper motions to Hipparcos-type precision or better. For these stars, systematic errors depending e.g. on position and colour are at a level of 0.3 milliarcsecond (mas). For the remaining stars we obtain positions at epoch J2015.0 accurate to ~10 mas. Positions and proper motions are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to ICRF to within 0.03 mas/yr. The Hipparcos reference frame is found to rotate with respect to the Gaia DR1 frame at a rate of 0.24 mas/yr. Based on less than a quarter of the nominal mission length and on very provisional and incomplete calibrations, the quality and completeness of the astrometric data in Gaia DR1 are far from what is expected for the final mission products. The results nevertheless represent a huge improvement in the available fundamental stellar data and practical definition of the optical reference frame.
  • We present more than 80 new variable stars discovered during the first observing season of the APACHE survey. APACHE is a project aimed at detecting extrasolar planets transiting nearby, bright M dwarfs by using an array of small-aperture telescopes. Despite the fact that the survey is targeted to a well-defined sample of cool stars, we also reduce and analyze data for all the detected field stars. Since July 2012 dozens of different stellar fields have been monitored, leading to the detection of several variables for which we propose a classification and estimate a period, when a periodicity is evident in the data. Thanks to the SuperWASP public archive, we have also retrieved and analyzed photometric data collected by the SWASP survey, which helped us to refine the classification and the period estimation of many variables found in the APACHE database. Some of the variables present peculiarities and thus are discussed separately.
  • A method is defined for identifying late T and Y dwarfs in WISE down to low values of signal-to-noise. This requires a WISE detection only in the W2-band and uses the statistical properties of the WISE multi-frame measurements and profile fit photometry to reject contamination resulting from non-point-like objects, variables and moving sources. To trace our desired parameter space we use a control sample of isolated non-moving non-variable point sources from the SDSS, and identify a sample of 158 WISE W2-only candidates down to a signal-to-noise limit of 8. For signal-to-noise ranges >10 and 8-10 respectively, ~45% and ~90% of our sample fall outside the selection criteria published by the WISE team (Kirkpatrick et al. 2012), due mainly to the type of constraints placed on the number of individual W2 detections. We present follow-up of eight candidates and identify WISE 0013+0634 and WISE 0833+0052, T8 and T9 dwarfs with high proper motion (~1.3 and ~1.8 arcsec/yr). Both objects show a mid-infrared/near-infrared excess of ~1-1.5 magnitudes, and are K-band suppressed. Distance estimates lead to space motion constraints that suggest halo (or at least thick disk) kinematics. We then assess the reduced proper motion diagram of WISE ultracool dwarfs, which suggests that late T and Y dwarfs may have a higher thick-disk/halo population fraction than earlier objects.
  • First, we summarize the four-year long efforts undertaken to build the final setup of the APACHE Project, a photometric transit search for small-size planets orbiting bright, low-mass M dwarfs. Next, we describe the present status of the APACHE survey, officially started in July 2012 at the site of the Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley, in the Western Italian Alps. Finally, we briefly discuss the potentially far-reaching consequences of a multi-technique characterization program of the (potentially planet-bearing) APACHE targets.
  • We identify 51 blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars, 12 possible BHB stars and 58 RR Lyrae stars in Anticentre fields. Their selection does not depend on their kinematics. Light curves and ephemerides are given for 7 previously unknown RR Lyrae stars. All but 4 of the RR Lyrae stars are of Oosterhoff type I. Our selection criteria for BHB stars give results that agree with those used by Smith et al. (2010) and Ruhland et al. (2011). We use 5 methods to determine distances for the BHB stars and 3 methods for the RR Lyrae stars to get distances on a uniform scale. Absolute proper motions (largely derived from the GSCII and SDSS (DR7) databases) are given for these stars; radial velocities are given for 31 of the BHB stars and 37 of the RR Lyrae stars. Combining these data for BHB and RR Lyrae stars with those previously found in fields at the North Galactic Pole, we find that retrograde orbits dominate for galactocentric distances greater than 12.5 kpc. The majority of metal-poor stars in the solar neighbourhood are known to be concentrated in a Lperp vs. Lz angular momentum plot. We show that the ratio of the number of outliers to the number in the main concentration increases with galactocentric distance. The location of these outliers with Lperp and Lz shows that the halo BHB and RR Lyrae stars have more retrograde orbits and a more spherical distribution with increasing galactocentric distance. Six RR Lyrae stars are identified in the H99 group of outliers; the small spread in their [Fe/H] suggests that they could have come from a single globular cluster. Another group of outliers contains two pairs of RR Lyrae stars; the stars in each pair have similar properties.
  • We have searched the WISE first data release for widely separated (<10,000AU) late T dwarf companions to Hipparcos and Gliese stars. We have discovered a new binary system containing a K-band suppressed T8p dwarf WISEP J1423+0116 and the mildly metal poor ([Fe/H]=-0.38+-0.06) primary BD+01 2920 (Hip 70319), a G1 dwarf at a distance of 17.2pc. This new benchmark has Teff=680+-55K and a mass of 20-50 Mjup. Its spectral properties are well modelled except for known discrepancies in the Y and K bands. Based on the well determined metallicity of its companion, the properties of BD+01 2920B imply that the currently known T dwarfs are dominated by young low-mass objects. We also present an accurate proper motion for the T8.5 dwarf WISEP J075003.84+272544.8.
  • We have carried out a search for late-type T dwarfs in the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey 6th Data Release. The search yielded two persuasive candidates, both of which have been confirmed as T dwarfs. The brightest, UGPS J0521+3640 has been assigned the spectral type T8.5 and appears to lie at a distance of 7-9 pc. The fainter of the two, UGPS J0652+0324, is classified as a T5.5 dwarf, and lies at an estimated distance of 28-37 pc. Warm-Spitzer observations in IRAC channels 1 and 2, taken as part of the GLIMPSE360 Legacy Survey, are available for UGPS J0521+3640 and we used these data with the near-infrared spectroscopy to estimate its properties. We find best fitting solar metallicity BT-Settl models for Teff = 600K and 650K and log g = 4.5 and 5.0. These parameters suggest a mass of between 14 and 32 MJup for an age between 1 and 5 Gyr. The proximity of this very cool T dwarf, and its location in the Galactic plane makes it an ideal candidate for high resolution adaptive optics imaging to search for cool companions.
  • We report the discovery of two new short-period variable stars in the Lyra constellation, GSC2.3 N208000326 and GSC2.3 N20B000251, observed at the Astronomical Observatory of Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley. Photometric measurements collected during several days are presented and discussed. One star appears to be a delta Scuti pulsating star (P=0.07848018+/-0.00000006 days; pulsation amplitudes V=0.055 mag and R=0.045; average (V-R)=0.378+/-0.009, probable spectral type F2). Th identity of the second star (P=0.402714+/-0.000008 days) resulted more difficult to be understood. We propose that this object should be classified as an eclipsing binary system where 0.065 and 0.055 are, respectively, the depths of the primary and secondary minimum in the light curve, as observed with a non standard R filter.
  • A feasibility study was carried out at the Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley demonstrating that it is a well-poised site to conduct an upcoming observing campaign aimed at detecting small-size (R<R_Neptune) transiting planets around nearby cool M dwarf stars. Three known transiting planet systems were monitored from May to August 2009 with a 25 cm f/3.8 Maksutov telescope. We reached seeing-independent, best-case photometric RMS less than 0.003 mag for stars with V<13, with a median RMS of 0.006 mag for the whole observing period.