• A hardening of the proton and helium fluxes is observed above a few hundreds of GeV/nuc. The distribution of local sources of primary cosmic rays has been suggested as a potential solution to this puzzling behavior. Some authors even claim that a single source is responsible for the observed anomalies. But how probable these explanations are? To answer that question, our current description of cosmic ray Galactic propagation needs to be replaced by the Myriad model. In the former approach, sources of protons and helium nuclei are treated as a jelly continuously spread over space and time. A more accurate description is provided by the Myriad model where sources are considered as point-like events. This leads to a probabilistic derivation of the fluxes of primary species, and opens the possibility that larger-than-average values may be observed at the Earth. For a long time though, a major obstacle has been the infinite variance associated to the probability distribution function which the fluxes follow. Several suggestions have been made to cure this problem but none is entirely satisfactory. We go a step further here and solve the infinite variance problem of the Myriad model by making use of the generalized central limit theorem. We find that primary fluxes are distributed according to a stable law with heavy tail, well-known to financial analysts. The probability that the proton and helium anomalies are sourced by local SNR can then be calculated. The p-values associated to the CREAM measurements turn out to be small, unless somewhat unrealistic propagation parameters are assumed.
  • This paper gives a description of a new on-line database http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb and associated on-line tools (data selection, data export, plots, etc.) for charged cosmic-ray measurements. The experimental setups (type, flight dates, techniques) from which the data originate are included in the database, along with the references to all relevant publications. The database relies on the MySQL5 engine. The web pages and queries are based on PHP, AJAX and the jquery, jquery.cluetip, jquery-ui, and table-sorter third-party libraries. In this first release, we restrict ourselves to Galactic cosmic rays with Z<=30 and a kinetic energy per nucleon up to a few tens of TeV/n. This corresponds to more than 200 different sub-experiments (i.e., different experiments, or data from the same experiment flying at different times) in as many publications. We set up a cosmic-ray database and provide tools to sort and visualise the data. New data can be submitted, providing the community with a collaborative tool to archive past and future cosmic-ray measurements. Any help/ideas to further expand and/or complement the database is welcome (please contact crdatabase@lpsc.in2p3.fr).
  • Measurements of cosmic ray fluxes by the PAMELA and CREAM experiments show unexpected spectral features between 200 GeV and 100 TeV. They could be due to the presence of nearby and young cosmic ray sources. This can be studied in the myriad model, in which cosmic rays diffuse from point-like instantaneous sources located randomly throughout the Galaxy. To test this hypothesis, one must compute the flux due to a catalog of local sources, but also the error bars associated to this quantity. This turns out not to be as straightforward as it seems, as the standard deviation is infinite when computed for the most general statistical ensemble. The goals of this paper are to provide a method to associate error bars to the flux measurements which has a clear statistical meaning, and to explore the relation between the myriad model and the more usual source model based on a continuous distribution. To this end, we show that the quantiles of the flux distribution are well-defined, even though the standard deviation is infinite. They can be used to compute 68% confidence levels, for instance. We also use the fact that local sources have known positions and ages to reduce the statistical ensemble from which random sources are drawn in the myriad model. We present a method to evaluate meaningful error bars for the flux obtained in the myriad model. In this context, we also discuss the status of the spectral features observed in the proton flux by CREAM and PAMELA.
  • G. Brooijmans, B. Gripaios, F. Moortgat, J. Santiago, P. Skands, D. Albornoz Vásquez, B. C. Allanach, A. Alloul, A. Arbey, A. Azatov, H. Baer, C. Balázs, A. Barr, L. Basso, M. Battaglia, P. Bechtle, G. Bélanger, A. Belyaev, K. Benslama, L. Bergström, A. Bharucha, C. Boehm, M. Bondarenko, O. Bondu, E. Boos, F. Boudjema, T. Bringmann, M. Brown, V. Bunichev, S. Calvet, M. Campanelli, A. Carmona, D. G. Cerdeño, M. Chala, R. S. Chivukula, D. Chowdhury, N. D. Christensen, M. Cirelli, S. Cox, K. Cranmer, J. Da Silva, T. Delahaye, A. De Roeck, A. Djouadi, E. Dobson, M. Dolan, F. Donato, G. Drieu La Rochelle, G. Duda, C. Duhr, B. Dumont, J. Edsjö, J. Ellis, C. Evoli, A. Falkowski, M. Felcini, B. Fuks, E. Gabrielli, D. Gaggero, S. Gascon-Shotkin, D. K. Ghosh, A. Giammanco, R. M. Godbole, P. Gondolo, T. Goto, D. Grasso, P. Gris, D. Guadagnoli, J. F. Gunion, U. Haisch, L. Hartgring, S. Heinemeyer, M. Hirsch, J. Hewett, A. Ismail, T. Jeltema, M. Kadastik, M. Kakizaki, K. Kannike, S. Khalil, J-L. Kneur, M. Krämer, S. Kraml, S. Kreiss, J. Lavalle, R. Leane, J. Lykken, L. Maccione, F. Mahmoudi, M. Mangano, S. P. Martin, D. Maurin, G. Moreau, S. Moretti, I. Moskalenko, G. Moultaka, M. Muhlleitner, I. Niessen, B. O'Leary, E. Orlando, P. Panci, G. Polesello, W. Porod, T. Porter, S. Profumo, H. Prosper, A. Pukhov, A. Racioppi, M. Raidal, M. Rausch de Traubenberg, A. Renaud, J. Reuter, T. G. Rizzo, T. Robens, A. Y. Rodríguez-Marrero, P. Salati, C. Savage, P. Scott, S. Sekmen, A. Semenov, C.-L. Shan, C. Shepherd-Themistocleous, E. H. Simmons, P. Slavich, C. Speckner, F. Staub, A. Strong, R. Taillet, F. S. Thomas, M. C. Thomas, I. Tomalin, M. Tytgat, M. Ughetto, L. Valéry, D. G. E. Walker, A. Weiler, S. M. West, C. D. White, A. J. Williams, A. Wingerter, C. Wymant, J.-H. Yu, C.-P. Yuan, D. Zerwas
    April 20, 2012 hep-ph, hep-ex
    We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.
  • Propagation of charged cosmic-rays in the Galaxy depends on the transport parameters, whose number can be large depending on the propagation model under scrutiny. A standard approach for determining these parameters is a manual scan, leading to an inefficient and incomplete coverage of the parameter space. We implement a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), which is well suited to multi-parameter determination. Its specificities (burn-in length, acceptance, and correlation length) are discussed in the phenomenologically well-understood Leaky-Box Model. From a technical point of view, a trial function based on binary-space partitioning is found to be extremely efficient, allowing a simultaneous determination of up to nine parameters, including transport and source parameters, such as slope and abundances. Our best-fit model includes both a low energy cut-off and reacceleration, whose values are consistent with those found in diffusion models. A Kolmogorov spectrum for the diffusion slope (delta=1/3) is excluded. The marginalised probability-density function for delta and alpha (the slope of the source spectra) are delta~0.55-0.60 and alpha~2.14-2.17, depending on the dataset used and the number of free parameters in the fit. All source-spectrum parameters (slope and abundances) are positively correlated among themselves and with the reacceleration strength, but are negatively correlated with the other propagation parameters. A forthcoming study will extend our analysis to more physical diffusion models.
  • We use a 1D propagation model to study the dependence of the pbar and dbar exotic fluxes on the transport parameters. The simple analytical solutions allow us i) to clarify the origin of the astrophysical uncertainties, and ii) to compare two models used for {\em signal} predictions, namely the constant and the linear Galactic wind models. We also study how these uncertainties should be reduced using forthcoming nuclear cosmic ray data. We confirm that the degeneracy of the transport parameters for a given propagation model leads to very different fluxes for primary antinuclei (~10^2). However, we show that with forthcoming data, these uncertainties could be greatly reduced (~2). As the precision will increase, the astrophysical uncertainty could then be dominated by our ignorance of the correct spatial dependence for some of the transport parameters: for instance, the constant and the linear wind models do not predict the same amount of exotic pbar at low energy.
  • The annihilation of dark matter (DM) in the Galaxy could produce specific imprints on the spectra of antimatter species in Galactic cosmic rays, which could be detected by upcoming experiments such as PAMELA and AMS02. Recent studies show that the presence of substructures can enhance the annihilation signal by a "boost factor" that not only depends on energy, but that is intrinsically a statistical property of the distribution of DM substructures inside the Milky Way. We investigate a scenario in which substructures consist of $\sim 100$ "mini-spikes" around intermediate-mass black holes. Focusing on primary positrons and antiprotons, we find large boost factors, up to a few thousand, that exhibit a large variance at high energy in the case of positrons and at low energy in the case of antiprotons. As a consequence, an estimate of the DM particle mass based on the observed cut-off in the positron spectrum could lead to a substantial underestimate of its actual value.
  • We present a measurement of the distant Type Ia supernova rate derived from the first two years of the Canada -- France -- Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey. We observed four one-square degree fields with a typical temporal frequency of <Delta t> ~ 4 observer-frame days over time spans of from 158 to 211 days per season for each field, with breaks during full moon. We used 8-10 meter-class telescopes for spectroscopic followup to confirm our candidates and determine their redshifts. Our starting sample consists of 73 spectroscopically verified Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.6. We derive a volumetric SN Ia rate of r_V(<z>=0.47) = 0.42^{+0.13}_{-0.09} (systematic) +- 0.06 (statistical) X 10^-4 yr^-1 Mpc^3, assuming h = 0.7, Omega_m = 0.3 and a flat cosmology. Using recently published galaxy luminosity functions derived in our redshift range, we derive a SN Ia rate per unit luminosity of r_L(<z>=0.47) = 0.154^{+0.048}_{-0.033} (systematic) ^{+0.039}_{-0.031} (statistical) SNu. Using our rate alone, we place an upper limit on the component of SN Ia production that tracks the cosmic star formation history of 1 SN Ia per 10^3 M_sun of stars formed. Our rate and other rates from surveys using spectroscopic sample confirmation display only a modest evolution out to z=0.55.
  • The Galactic secondary cosmic ray anti-proton flux calculated with different propagation models is fairly consistent with data, and the associated propagation uncertainty is small. This is not the case for any anti-proton exotic component of the dark matter halo. Detailed propagation models are mandatory if the ultimate goal is to explain an excess. However, simpler and faster approximate formulae for anti-protons are an attractive alternative to quickly check that a given dark matter model is not inconsistent with the anti-proton observed flux. This paper provides such formulae. In addition, they could be used to put constraints on new physics in this channel, where an extensive scan of a large parameter space could otherwise be quite expensive in computer ressources.
  • We present a progress report on a project to derive the evolution of the volumetric supernova Type Ia rate from the Supernova Legacy Survey. Our preliminary estimate of the rate evolution divides the sample from Neill et al. (2006) into two redshift bins: 0.2 < z < 0.4, and 0.4 < z < 0.6. We extend this by adding a bin from the sample analyzed in Sullivan et al. (2006) in the range 0.6 < z < 0.75 from the same time period. We compare the derived trend with previously published rates and a supernova Type Ia production model having two components: one component associated closely with star formation and an additional component associated with host galaxy mass. Our observed trend is consistent with this model, which predicts a rising SN Ia rate out to at least z=2.
  • We compare the rise times of nearby and distant Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as a test for evolution using 73 high-redshift spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia from the first two years of the five year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and published observations of nearby SN. Because of the ``rolling'' search nature of the SNLS, our measurement is approximately 6 times more precise than previous studies, allowing for a more sensitive test of evolution between nearby and distant supernovae. Adopting a simple $t^2$ early-time model (as in previous studies), we find that the rest-frame $B$ rise times for a fiducial SN Ia at high and low redshift are consistent, with values $19.10^{+0.18}_{-0.17}({stat}) \pm 0.2 ({syst})$ and $19.58^{+0.22}_{-0.19}$ days, respectively; the statistical significance of this difference is only 1.4 \sg . The errors represent the uncertainty in the mean rather than any variation between individual SN. We also compare subsets of our high-redshift data set based on decline rate, host galaxy star formation rate, and redshift, finding no substantive evidence for any subsample dependence.
  • (ABRIDGED) We show that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are formed within both very young and old stellar populations, with observed rates that depend on the stellar mass and mean star-formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. Models where the SN Ia rate depends solely on host galaxy stellar mass are ruled out with 99% confidence. Our analysis is based on 100 spectroscopically-confirmed SNe Ia, plus 24 photometrically-classified events, all from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and distributed over 0.2<z<0.75. Using multi-band photometry, we estimate stellar masses and SFRs for the SN Ia host galaxies by fitting their broad-band spectral energy distributions with the galaxy spectral synthesis code, PEGASE.2. We show that the SN Ia rate per unit mass is proportional to the specific SFR of the parent galaxies -- more vigorously star-forming galaxies host more SNe Ia per unit stellar mass, broadly equivalent to the trend of increasing SN Ia rate in later-type galaxies seen in the local universe. Following earlier suggestions for a simple "two-component" model approximating the SN Ia rate, we find bivariate linear dependencies of the SN Ia rate on both the stellar masses and the mean SFRs of the host systems. We also demonstrate a dependence of distant SN Ia light-curve shapes on star-formation in the host galaxy, similar to trends observed locally. Passive galaxies, with no star-formation, preferentially host faster-declining/dimmer SNe Ia, while slower-declining/brighter events are only found in systems with ongoing star-formation. We model the light-curve width distribution in star-forming galaxies as the sum of a young component, and an old component taken from the distribution in non-star-forming galaxies.
  • We present a method for selecting high-redshift type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) located via rolling SN searches. The technique, using both color and magnitude information of events from only 2-3 epochs of multi-band real-time photometry, is able to discriminate between SNe Ia and core collapse SNe. Furthermore, for the SNe Ia, the method accurately predicts the redshift, phase and light-curve parameterization of these events based only on pre-maximum-light data. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the technique on a simulated survey of SNe Ia and core-collapse SNe, where the selection method effectively rejects most core-collapse SNe while retaining SNe Ia. We also apply the selection code to real-time data acquired as part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). During the period May 2004 to January 2005 in the SNLS, 440 SN candidates were discovered of which 70 were confirmed spectroscopically as SNe Ia and 15 as core-collapse events. For this test dataset, the selection technique correctly identifies 100% of the identified SNe II as non-SNe Ia with only a 1-2% false rejection rate. The predicted parameterization of the SNe Ia has a precision of |delta_z|/(1+z_spec)<0.09 in redshift, and +/- 2-3 rest-frame days in phase, providing invaluable information for planning spectroscopic follow-up observations. We also investigate any bias introduced by this selection method on the ability of surveys such as SNLS to measure cosmological parameters (e.g., w and omega matter), and find any effect to be negligible.
  • We present distance measurements to 71 high redshift type Ia supernovae discovered during the first year of the 5-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-color light-curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshift. With this data set, we have built a Hubble diagram extending to z=1, with all distance measurements involving at least two bands. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated making use of the multi-band photometry obtained at CFHT. Cosmological fits to this first year SNLS Hubble diagram give the following results : Omega_M = 0.263 +/- 0.042(stat) +/- 0.032(sys) for a flat LambdaCDM model; and w = -1.023 +/- 0.090(stat) +/- 0.054(sys) for a flat cosmology with constant equation of state w when combined with the constraint from the recent Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations.
  • We present new techiques for improving the efficiency of supernova (SN) classification at high redshift using 64 candidates observed at Gemini North and South during the first year of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). The SNLS is an ongoing five year project with the goal of measuring the equation of state of Dark Energy by discovering and following over 700 high-redshift SNe Ia using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. We achieve an improvement in the SN Ia spectroscopic confirmation rate: at Gemini 71% of candidates are now confirmed as SNe Ia, compared to 54% using the methods of previous surveys. This is despite the comparatively high redshift of this sample, where the median SN Ia redshift is z=0.81 (0.155 <= z <= 1.01). These improvements were realized because we use the unprecedented color coverage and lightcurve sampling of the SNLS to predict whether a candidate is an SN Ia and estimate its redshift, before obtaining a spectrum, using a new technique called the "SN photo-z." In addition, we have improved techniques for galaxy subtraction and SN template chi^2 fitting, allowing us to identify candidates even when they are only 15% as bright as the host galaxy. The largest impediment to SN identification is found to be host galaxy contamination of the spectrum -- when the SN was at least as bright as the underlying host galaxy the target was identified more than 90% of the time. However, even SNe on bright host galaxies can be easily identified in good seeing conditions. When the image quality was better than 0.55 arcsec the candidate was identified 88% of the time. Over the five-year course of the survey, using the selection techniques presented here we will be able to add approximately 170 more confirmed SNe Ia than would be possible using previous methods.
  • In most cosmological models, primordial black holes (PBHs) should have formed in the early Universe. Their Hawking evaporation into particles could eventually lead to the formation of antideuterium nuclei. This paper is devoted to a first computation of this antideuteron flux. The production of these antinuclei is studied with a simple coalescence scheme, and their propagation in the Galaxy is treated with a well-constrained diffusion model. We compare the resulting primary flux to the secondary background, due to the spallation of protons on the interstellar matter. Antideuterons are shown to be a very sensitive probe for primordial black holes in our Galaxy. The next generation of experiments should allow investigators to significantly improve the current upper limit, nor even provide the first evidence of the existence of evaporating black holes.
  • It is widely believed that dark matter exists within galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Under the assumption that this dark matter is composed of the lightest, stable supersymmetric particle, assumed to be the neutralino, the feasibility of its indirect detection via observations of a diffuse gamma-ray signal due to neutralino annihilation within M31 is examined.
  • Primordial black holes (PBHs) have motivated many studies since it was shown that they should evaporate and produce all kinds of particles. Recent experimental measurements of cosmic rays with great accuracy, theoretical investigations on the possible formation mechanisms and detailed evaporation processes have revived the interest in such astrophysical objects. This article aims at using the latest developments on antiproton propagation models together with new data from BESS, CAPRICE and AMS experiments to constrain the local amount of PBH dark matter. Depending on the diffusion halo parameters and on the details of emission mechanism, we derive an average upper limit of the order of rho < 1.7E-33 g cm^-3.
  • Recent observations give some clues that the lenses discovered by the microlensing experiments in the direction of the Magellanic Clouds may be located in these satellite galaxies. We re-examine the possibility that self-lensing alone may account for the optical depth measured towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We present a self-consistent multi-component model of the LMC consisting of distinct stellar populations, each associated to a vertical velocity dispersion ranging from 10 to 60 km/s. The present work focuses on showing that such dispersions comply with current 20 - 30 km/s limits set by observation on specific LMC populations. We also show that this model reproduces both the 1-2 10^-7 observed optical depth and the event duration distribution.
  • We consider neutralino annihilation in dense extragalactic systems known to be dominated by dark matter, in particular M87 and several local dwarf spheroidal galaxies. These annihilations can produce energetic gamma rays which may be visible to atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. We explore the supersymmetric parameter space, and compute the expected flux of gamma--rays coming from these objects. It is shown that some parts of the parameter space lead to a signal observable with the next generation of Cerenkov telescopes, provided the supersymmetric dark matter has a clumpy structure, as may be expected in a hierarchical scenario for structure formation.
  • The observed microlensing events towards the LMC do not have yet a coherent explanation. If they are due to Galactic Halo objects, the nature of these objects is puzzling --- half the halo in dark 0.5 Msol objects. On the other hand, traditional models of the LMC predict a self-lensing optical depth about an order of magnitude too low, although characteristics of some of the observed events favor a self-lensing explanation. We present here two models of the LMC taking into account the correlation between the mass of the stars and their velocity dispersion: a thin Mestel disk, and an ellipsoidal model. Both yield optical depths, event rates, and event duration distributions compatible with the observations. The grounds for such models are discussed, as well as their observational consequences.
  • The leaky box model is now ruled out by measurements of a cosmic ray gradient throughout the galactic disk. It needs to be replaced by a more refined treatment which takes into account the diffusion of cosmic rays in the magnetic fields of the Galaxy. We have estimated the flux of antiprotons on the Earth in the framework of a two-zone diffusion model. Those species are created by the spallation reactions of high-energy nuclei with the interstellar gas. Another potential source of antiprotons is the annihilation of supersymmetric particles in the dark halo that surrounds our Galaxy. In this letter, we investigate both processes. Special emphasis is given to the antiproton signature of supersymmetric dark matter. The corresponding signal exceeds the conventional spallation flux below 300 MeV, a domain that will be thoroughly explored by the Antimatter Spectrometer experiment. The propagation of the antiprotons produced in the remote regions of the halo back to the Earth plays a crucial role. Depending on the energy, the leaky box estimates are wrong by a factor varying from 0.5 up to 3.