• The quantum spin liquid is a highly entangled magnetic state characterized by the absence of long-range magnetic order or any static magnetism in its ground state. Instead the spins are continuously fluctuating in a highly correlated way down to the lowest temperatures. The spin liquid state is very rare and is confined to a few specific cases where the interactions between the magnetic ions cannot be simultaneously satisfied (known as frustration). Lattices with magnetic ions in triangular or tetrahedral arrangements which interact via isotropic antiferromagnetic interactions can generate frustration because it is impossible to connect all the bonds with magnetic moments that are aligned antiparallel. Three-dimensional isotropic spin liquids have mostly been sought in materials where the magnetic ions form pyrochlore or hyperkagome lattices. Here we discover a new three-dimensional lattice that enables spin liquid behavior called the hyper-hyperkagome lattice which manifests in the compound PbCuTe$_{2}$O$_{6}$. Using a combination of experiment and theory we show that this system satisfies the requirements for a quantum spin liquid including the absence of static magnetism and the presence of diffuse continua in the magnetic spectrum suggestive of fractional spinon excitations. This result is important because it reveals new ways to engineer spin liquid behaviour.
  • Low-energy spin excitations in any long-range ordered magnetic system in the absence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy are gapless Goldstone modes emanating from the ordering wave vectors. In helimagnets, these modes hybridize into the so-called helimagnon excitations. Here we employ neutron spectroscopy supported by theoretical calculations to investigate the magnetic excitation spectrum of the isotropic Heisenberg helimagnet ZnCr2Se4 with a cubic spinel structure, in which spin-3/2 magnetic Cr3+ ions are arranged in a geometrically frustrated pyrochlore sublattice. Apart from the conventional Goldstone mode emanating from the (0 0 q) ordering vector, low-energy magnetic excitations in the single-domain proper-screw spiral phase show soft helimagnon modes with a small energy gap of ~0.17 meV, emerging from two orthogonal wave vectors (q 0 0) and (0 q 0) where no magnetic Bragg peaks are present. We term them pseudo-Goldstone magnons, as they appear gapless within linear spin-wave theory and only acquire a finite gap due to higher-order quantum-fluctuation corrections. Our results are likely universal for a broad class of symmetric helimagnets, opening up a new way of studying weak magnon-magnon interactions with accessible spectroscopic methods.
  • We report on the scaling behavior of V-doped (Bi,Sb)$_2$Te$_3$ samples in the quantum anomalous Hall regime for samples of various thickness. While previous quantum anomalous Hall measurements showed the same scaling as expected from a two-dimensional integer quantum Hall state, we observe a dimensional crossover to three spatial dimensions as a function of layer thickness. In the limit of a sufficiently thick layer, we find scaling behavior matching the flow diagram of two parallel conducting topological surface states of a three-dimensional topological insulator each featuring a fractional shift of $\frac{1}{2} e^2/h$ in the flow diagram Hall conductivity, while we recover the expected integer quantum Hall behavior for thinner layers. This constitutes the observation of a distinct type of quantum anomalous Hall effect, resulting from $\frac{1}{2} e^2/h$ Hall conductance quantization of three-dimensional topological insulator surface states, in an experiment which does not require decomposition of signal to separate the contribution of two surfaces. This provides a possible experimental link between quantum Hall physics and axion electrodynamics.
  • By combining bulk sensitive soft-X-ray angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and accurate first-principles calculations we explored the bulk electronic properties of WTe$_2$, a candidate type-II Weyl semimetal featuring a large non-saturating magnetoresistance. Despite the layered geometry suggesting a two-dimensional electronic structure, we find a three-dimensional electronic dispersion. We report an evident band dispersion in the reciprocal direction perpendicular to the layers, implying that electrons can also travel coherently when crossing from one layer to the other. The measured Fermi surface is characterized by two well-separated electron and hole pockets at either side of the $\Gamma$ point, differently from previous more surface sensitive ARPES experiments that additionally found a significant quasiparticle weight at the zone center. Moreover, we observe a significant sensitivity of the bulk electronic structure of WTe$_2$ around the Fermi level to electronic correlations and renormalizations due to self-energy effects, previously neglected in first-principles descriptions.
  • Quantum spin Hall (QSH) materials promise revolutionary device applications based on dissipationless propagation of spin currents. They are two-dimensional (2D) representatives of the family of topological insulators, which exhibit conduction channels at their edges inherently protected against scattering. Initially predicted for graphene, and eventually realized in HgTe quantum wells, in the QSH systems realized so far, the decisive bottleneck preventing applications is the small bulk energy gap of less than 30 meV, requiring cryogenic operation temperatures in order to suppress detrimental bulk contributions to the edge conductance. Room-temperature functionalities, however, require much larger gaps. Here we show how this can be achieved by making use of a new QSH paradigm based on substrate-supported atomic monolayers of a high-Z element. Experimentally, the material is synthesized as honeycomb lattice of bismuth atoms, forming "bismuthene", on top of the wide-gap substrate SiC(0001). Consistent with the theoretical expectations, the spectroscopic signatures in experiment display a huge gap of ~0.8 eV in bismuthene, as well as conductive edge states. The analysis of the layer-substrate orbitals arrives at a QSH phase, whose topological gap - as a hallmark mechanism - is driven directly by the atomic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Our results demonstrate how strained artificial lattices of heavy atoms, in contact with an insulating substrate, can be utilized to evoke a novel topological wide-gap scenario, where the chemical potential is located well within the global system gap, ensuring pure edge state conductance. We anticipate future experiments on topological signatures, such as transport measurements that probe the QSH effect via quantized universal conductance, notably at room temperature.
  • We numerically investigate the surface states of a strong topological insulator in the presence of strong electron-electron interactions. We choose a spherical topological insulator geometry to make the surface amenable to a finite size analysis. The single-particle problem maps to that of Landau orbitals on the sphere with a magnetic monopole at the center that has unit strength and opposite sign for electrons with opposite spin. Assuming density-density contact interactions, we find superconducting and anomalous (quantum) Hall phases for attractive and repulsive interactions, respectively, as well as chiral fermion and chiral Majorana fermion boundary modes between different phases. Our setup is preeminently adapted to the search for topologically ordered surface terminations that could be microscopically stabilized by tailored surface interaction profiles.
  • We study three proposals for broken symmetry in the cuprate pseudogap - oxygen antiferromagnetism, $\Theta_{II}$ orbital loop currents, and circulating currents involving apex oxygens - through numerical exploration of multi-orbital Hubbard models. Our numerically exact results show no evidence for the existence of oxygen antiferromagnetic order or the $\Theta_{II}$ phase in the three-orbital Hubbard model. The model also fails to sustain an ordered current pattern even with the presence of additional apex oxygen orbitals. We thereby conclude that it is difficult to stabilize the aforementioned phases in the multi-orbital Hubbard models for parameters relevant to cuprate superconductors. However, the $\Theta_{II}$ phase might be stabilized through explicit flux terms. We find an enhanced propensity for circulating currents with such terms in calculations simulating applied stress or strain, which skew the copper-oxygen plane to resemble a kagome lattice. We propose an experimental viewpoint to shed additional light on this problem.
  • We investigate the superconducting pairing instabilities of eight-band models for the iron arsenides. Using a functional renormalization group treatment, we determine how the critical energy scale for superconductivity depends on the electronic band structure. Most importantly, if we vary the parameters from values corresponding to LaFeAsO to SmFeAsO, the pairing scale is strongly enhanced, in accordance with the experimental observation. We analyze the reasons for this trend and compare the results of the eight-band approach to those found using five-band models.
  • We have performed extensive density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) studies of the Hubbard model on a honeycomb ladder. The band structure (with Hubbard U=0) exhibits an unusual quadratic band touching at half filling, which is associated with a quantum Lifshitz transition from a band insulator to a metal. %SAK as a function of a third-neighbor hopping parameter. For one electron per site, non-zero $U$ drives the system into an insulating state in which there is no pair-binding between added electrons; this implies that superconductivity driven directly by the repulsive electron-electron interactions is unlikely in the regime of small doping, $x\ll 1$. However, the divergent density of states as $x\to 0$, the large values of the phonon frequencies, and an unusual correlation induced enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling imply that lightly doped polyacenes, which approximately realize this structure, are good candidates for high temperature electron-phonon driven superconductivity.
  • In conventional and high transition temperature copper oxide and iron pnictide superconductors, the Cooper pairs all have even parity. As a rare exception, Sr$_2$RuO$_4$ is the first prime candidate for topological chiral p-wave superconductivity, which has time-reversal breaking odd-parity Cooper pairs known to exist before only in the neutral superfluid $^3$He. However, there are several key unresolved issues hampering the microscopic description of the unconventional superconductivity. Spin fluctuations at both large and small wavevectors are present in experiments, but how they arise and drive superconductivity is not yet clear. Spontaneous edge current is expected but not observed conclusively. Specific experiments point to highly band- and/or momentum-dependent energy gaps for quasiparticle excitations in the superconducting state. Here, by comprehensive functional renormalization group calculations with all relevant bands, we disentangle the various competing possibilities. In particular we show the small wavevector spin fluctuations, driven by a single two-dimensional band, trigger p-wave superconductivity with quasi-nodal energy gaps.
  • We study oxygen K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and investigate the validity of the Zhang-Rice singlet (ZRS) picture in overdoped cuprate superconductors. Using large-scale exact diagonalization of the three-orbital Hubbard model, we observe the effect of strong correlations manifesting in a dynamical spectral weight transfer from the upper Hubbard band to the ZRS band. The quantitative agreement between theory and experiment highlights an additional spectral weight reshuffling due to core-hole interaction. Our results confirm the important correlated nature of the cuprates and elucidate the changing orbital character of the low-energy quasi-particles, but also demonstrate the continued relevance of the ZRS even in the overdoped region.
  • We present a polarization resolved study of the low energy band structure in the optimally doped iron pnictide superconductor Ba$_{0.6}$K$_{0.4}$Fe$_2$As$_2$ (T$_c$=37K) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Polarization-contrasted measurements are used to identify and trace all three low energy hole-like bands predicted by local density approximation (LDA) calculations. The photoemitted electrons reveal an inconsistency with LDA-predicted symmetries along the $\Gamma$-X high symmetry momentum axis, due to unexpectedly strong rotational anisotropy in electron kinetics. We evaluate many-body effects such as Mott-Hubbard interactions that are likely to underlie the anomaly, and discuss how the observed deviations from LDA band structure affect the energetics of iron pnictide Cooper pairing in the hole doped regime.
  • We explore the role of charge reservoir layers (CRLs) on the superconducting transition temperature of cuprate superconductors. Specifically, we study the effect of CRLs with efficient short distance dielectric screening coupled capacitively to copper oxide metallic layers. We argue that dielectric screening at short distances and at frequencies of the order of the superconducting gap, but small compared to the Fermi energy can significantly enhance T$_c$, the transition temperature of an unconventional superconductor. We discuss the relevance of our qualitative arguments to a broader class of unconventional superconductors.
  • Combining thermodynamic measurements with theoretical density functional and thermodynamic calculations we demonstrate that the honeycomb lattice iridates A2IrO3 (A = Na, Li) are magnetically ordered Mott insulators where the magnetism of the effective spin-orbital S = 1/2 moments can be captured by a Heisenberg-Kitaev (HK) model with Heisenberg interactions beyond nearest-neighbor exchange. Experimentally, we observe an increase of the Curie-Weiss temperature from \theta = -125 K for Na2IrO3 to \theta = -33 K for Li2IrO3, while the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature remains roughly the same T_N = 15 K for both materials. Using finite-temperature functional renormalization group calculations we show that this evolution of \theta, T_N, the frustration parameter f = \theta/T_N, and the zig-zag magnetic ordering structure suggested for both materials by density functional theory can be captured within this extended HK model. Combining our experimental and theoretical results, we estimate that Na2IrO3 is deep in the magnetically ordered regime of the HK model (\alpha \approx 0.25), while Li2IrO3 appears to be close to a spin-liquid regime (0.6 < \alpha < 0.7).
  • The sign and profile of the thermal Hall conductivity $\kappa_{xy}$ gives important insights into the gap structure of multi-band superconductors. With this perspective, we have investigated $\kappa_{xy}$ and the thermal conductivity $\kappa_{xx}$ in $\rm Ba_{1-x}K_xFe_2As_2$ which display large peak anomalies in the superconducting state. The anomalies imply that a large hole-like quasiparticle (qp) population exists below the critical temperature $T_c$. We show that the qp mean-free-path inferred from $\kappa_{xx}$ reproduces the observed anomaly in $\kappa_{xy}$, providing a consistent estimate of a large qp population. Further, we demonstrate that the hole-like signal is consistent with a theoretical scenario where despite potentially large gap variations on the electron pockets, the minimal homogeneous gap of the superconducting phase resides at a hole pocket. Implications for probing the gap structure in the broader class of pnictide superconductors are discussed.
  • The recent discovery of fractional quantum Hall states in graphene raises the question of whether the physics of graphene and its bilayer offers any advantages over GaAs-based materials in exploring strongly-correlated states of two-dimensional electrons. Here we propose a method to continuously tune the effective electron interactions in graphene and its bilayer by the dielectric environment of the sample. Using this method, the charge gaps of prominent FQH states, including \nu=1/3 or \nu=5/2 states, can be increased several times, or reduced all the way to zero. The tunability of the interactions can be used to realize and stabilize various strongly correlated phases in the FQH regime, and to explore the transitions between them.
  • We investigate the effect of a transverse magnetic field on the toric code model. We show that this problem can be mapped onto the Xu-Moore model and thus onto the quantum compass model which are known to be self-dual. We analyze the low-energy spectrum by means of perturbative continuous unitary transformations and determine accurately the energy gaps of various symmetry sectors. Our results are in very good agreement with exact diagonalization data for all values of the parameters except at the self-dual point where level crossings are responsible for a first order phase transition between a topological phase and a polarized phase. Interestingly, bound states of two and four quasiparticles with fermionic and bosonic statistics emerge, and display dispersion relations of reduced dimensionality.
  • We analyze the properties of low-energy bound states in the transverse-field Ising model and in the XXZ model on the square lattice. To this end, we develop an optimized implementation of perturbative continuous unitary transformations. The Ising model is studied in the small-field limit which is found to be a special case of the toric code model in a magnetic field. To analyze the XXZ model, we perform a perturbative expansion about the Ising limit in order to discuss the fate of the elementary magnon excitations when approaching the Heisenberg point.
  • We give a complete definition of the entanglement gap separating low-energy, topological levels, from high-energy, generic ones, in the "entanglement spectrum" of Fractional Quantum Hall (FQH) states. By removing the magnetic length inherent in the FQH problem - a procedure which we call taking the "conformal limit", we find that the entanglement spectrum of an incompressible ground-state of a generic (i.e. Coulomb) lowest Landau Level Hamiltonian re-arranges into a low-(entanglement) energy part separated by a full gap from the high energy entanglement levels. As previously observed, the counting of these levels starts off as the counting of modes of the edge theory of the FQH state, but quickly develops finite-size effects which we show can also serve as a fingerprint of the FQH state. As the sphere manifold where the FQH resides grows, the level spacing of the states at the same angular momentum goes to zero, suggestive of the presence of relativistic gapless edge-states. By using the adiabatic continuity of the low entanglement energy levels, we investigate whether two states are topologically connected.
  • We use extensive DMRG calculations to show that a classification of SU(n) spin chains with regard to the existence of spinon confinement and hence a Haldane gap obtained previously for valence bond solid models applies to SU(n) Heisenberg chains as well. In particular, we observe spinon confinement due to a next-nearest neighbor interaction in the SU(4) representation 10 spin chain.
  • The DMRG method is applied to integrable models of antiferromagnetic spin chains for fundamental and higher representations of SU(2), SU(3), and SU(4). From the low energy spectrum and the entanglement entropy, we compute the central charge and the primary field scaling dimensions. These parameters allow us to identify uniquely the Wess-Zumino-Witten models capturing the low energy sectors of the models we consider.