• Chapter 2 in High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) : Preliminary Design Report. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cavities for beam rotation with ultra-precise phase control, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation and 300 metre-long high-power superconducting links with negligible energy dissipation. The present document describes the technologies and components that will be used to realise the project and is intended to serve as the basis for the detailed engineering design of HL-LHC.
  • The Oide effect considers the synchrotron radiation in the final focusing quadrupole and it sets a lower limit on the vertical beam size at the Interaction Point, particularly relevant for high energy linear colliders. The theory of the Oide effect was derived considering only the radiation in the focusing plane of the magnet. This article addresses the theoretical calculation of the radiation effect on the beam size consider- ing both focusing and defocusing planes of the quadrupole, refered to as 2D-Oide. The CLIC 3 TeV final quadrupole (QD0) and beam parameters are used to compare the theoretical results from the Oide effect and the 2D-Oide effect with particle tracking in PLACET. The 2D-oide demonstrates to be important as it increases by 17% the contribution to the beam size. Further insight into the aberrations induced by the synchrotron radiation opens the possibility to partially correct the 2D-Oide effect with octupole magn
  • The FCC (Future Circular Collider) study represents a vision for the next large project in high energy physics, comprising an 80-100 km tunnel that can house a future 100 TeV hadron collider. The study also includes a high luminosity e+e- collider operating in the centre-of-mass energy range of 90-350 GeV as a possible intermediate step, the FCC-ee. The FCC-ee aims at definitive electro-weak precision measurements of the Z, W, H and top particles, and search for rare phenomena. Although FCC-ee is based on known technology, the goal performance in luminosity and energy calibration make it quite challenging. During 2014 the study went through an exploration phase. The study has now entered its second year and the aim is to produce a conceptual design report during the next three to four years. We here report on progress since the last IPAC conference.
  • Motivated by studies in accelerator physics this paper computes the asymptotic behavior of the series $\displaystyle \sum_{k=1}^N \varphi(k) I_N\left(\frac{1}{k}\right)$, where $\varphi(k)$ is Euler's Totient function and $\displaystyle I_N\left(\frac{1}{k}\right)$ is the position that $1/k$ occupies in the Farey sequence of order $N$. To this end an exact formula for $\displaystyle I_N\left(\frac{1}{k}\right)$ is derived when all integers in $\displaystyle \left[2,\left\lceil \frac{N}{k} \right\rceil\right]$ are divisors of $N$.
  • Collimator wakefields in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) of future linear colliders, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC), can be an important source of emittance growth and beam jitter amplification, consequently degrading the luminosity. Therefore, a better understanding of collimator wakefield effects is essential to optimise the collimation systems of future linear colliders in order to minimise wakefield effects. In the past, measurements of single-bunch collimator wakefields have been carried out at SLAC with the aim of benchmarking theory, numerical calculations and experiments. Those studies revealed some discrepancies between the measurements and the theoretical models. New experimental tests using available beam test facilities, such as the End Station A Test Beam (ESTB) at SLAC, would help to improve our understanding on collimator wakefields. ESTB will provide the perfect test bed to investigate collimator wakefields for different bunch length conditions, relevant for both ILC (300 micrometers nominal bunch length) and CLIC (44 micrometers nominal bunch length) studies. Here we propose to perform new experimental tests of collimator wakefield effects on electron/positron beams at SLAC ESTB.
  • ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line which aims to focus the low emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a vertical size of about 37 nm and to demonstrate nanometer level beam stability. Several advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools are used. In December 2008, construction and installation were completed and beam commissioning started, supported by an international team of Asian, European, and U.S. scientists. The present status and first results are described.
  • The emittance preservation in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) is one of the major challenges in CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. Different tuning techniques have been applied to the CLIC BDS and in particular to the Final Focus System (FFS) in order to mitigate static and dynamic imperfections. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-beam backgrounds processes at CLIC 3 TeV CM energy as fast luminosity signal. In particular the hadrons multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.
  • A Monte Carlo program for the simulation of electromagnetic cascades initiated by high-energy photons and electrons interacting with extragalactic background light (EBL) is presented. Pair production and inverse Compton scattering on EBL photons as well as synchrotron losses and deflections of the charged component in extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMF) are included in the simulation. Weighted sampling of the cascade development is applied to reduce the number of secondary particles and to speed up computations. As final result, the simulation procedure provides the energy, the observation angle, and the time delay of secondary cascade particles at the present epoch. Possible applications are the study of TeV blazars and the influence of the EGMF on their spectra or the calculation of the contribution from ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or dark matter to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background. As an illustration, we present results for deflections and time-delays relevant for the derivation of limits on the EGMF.
  • Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the characterisation and improvement of the design of the post-linac collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This system consists of two sections: one dedicated to the collimation of off-energy particles and another one for betatron collimation. The energy collimation system is further conceived as protection system against damage by errant beams. In this respect, special attention is paid to the optimisation of the energy collimator design. The material and the physical parameters of the energy collimators are selected to withstand the impact of an entire bunch train. Concerning the betatron collimation section, different aspects of the design have been optimised: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers has been reviewed to minimise wakefields; in addition, the optics design has been optimised to improve the collimation efficiency. This report presents the current status of the the post-linac collimation system of CLIC. Part I of this report is dedicated to the study of the CLIC energy collimation system.
  • Important efforts have recently been dedicated to the characterisation and improvement of the design of the post-linac collimation system of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). This system consists of two sections: one dedicated to the collimation of off-energy particles and another one for betatron collimation. The energy collimation system is further conceived as protection system against damage by errant beams. In this respect, special attention is paid to the optimisation of the energy collimator design. The material and the physical parameters of the energy collimators are selected to withstand the impact of an entire bunch train. Concerning the betatron collimation section, different aspects of the design have been optimised: the transverse collimation depths have been recalculated in order to reduce the collimator wakefield effects while maintaining a good efficiency in cleaning the undesired beam halo; the geometric design of the spoilers has been reviewed to minimise wakefields; in addition, the optics design has been optimised to improve the collimation efficiency. This report presents the current status of the the post-linac collimation system of CLIC. Part II is mainly dedicated to the study of the betatron collimation system and collimator wakefield effects.
  • We consider the effect of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI, for short) on the propagation of neutrinos through the supernova (SN) envelope within a three-neutrino framework and taking into account the presence of a neutrino background. We find that for given NSI parameters, with strength generically denoted by $\varepsilon_{ij}$, neutrino evolution exhibits a significant time dependence. For $|\varepsilon_{\tau\tau}|\gtrsim$ $10^{-3}$ the neutrino survival probability may become sensitive to the $\theta_{23}$ octant and the sign of $\varepsilon_{\tau\tau}$. In particular, if $\varepsilon_{\tau\tau}\gtrsim 10^{-2}$ an internal $I$-resonance may arise independently of the matter density. For typical values found in SN simulations this takes place in the same dense-neutrino region above the neutrinosphere where collective effects occur, in particular during the synchronization regime. This resonance may lead to an exchange of the neutrino fluxes entering the bipolar regime. The main consequences are (i) bipolar conversion taking place for normal neutrino mass hierarchy and (ii) a transformation of the flux of low-energy $\nu_e$, instead of the usual spectral swap.
  • High energy photons from blazars interact within tens of kpc with the extragalactic photon background, initiating electromagnetic pair cascades. The charged component of such cascades is deflected by extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMF), leading to halos even around initially point-like sources. We calculate the intensity profile of the resulting secondary high-energy photons for different assumptions on the initial source spectrum and the strength of the EGMF, employing also fields found earlier in a constrained simulation of structure formation including MHD processes. We find that the observation of halos around blazars like Mrk~180 probes an interesting range of EGMF strengths and acceleration models: In particular, blazar halos test if the photon energy spectrum at the source extends beyond \sim 100 TeV and how anisotropic this high energy component is emitted.
  • We calculated for the nearest active galactic nucleus (AGN), Centaurus A (Cen A), the flux of high energy cosmic rays and of accompanying secondary photons and neutrinos expected from hadronic interactions in the source. We used as two basic models for the generation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) shock acceleration in the radio jet and acceleration in the regular electromagnetic field close to the core of the AGN, normalizing the UHECR flux to the observations of the Auger experiment. Here we compare the previously obtained photon fluxes with the recent data reported by the Fermi LAT and H.E.S.S. collaborations. In the case of the core model, we find good agreement both for the predicted spectral shape and the overall normalization between our earlier results and the H.E.S.S. observations for a primary proton energy $dN/dE\propto E^{-\alpha}$ with $\alpha\sim 2$ or smaller. A broken-power law with high-energy part $\alpha=-2.7$ leads to photon fluxes in excess of the Fermi measurements. The energy spectrum of the photon fluxes obtained by us for the jet scenario is in all cases at variance with the H.E.S.S. and Fermi observations.
  • We reexamine the possibility of reconstructing the initial fluxes of supernova neutrinos emitted in a future core-collapse galactic supernova explosion and detected in a Megaton-sized water Cherenkov detector. A novel key element in our method is the inclusion, in addition to the total and the average energies of each neutrino species, of a "pinching" parameter characterizing the width of the distribution as a fit parameter. We uncover in this case a continuous degeneracy in the reconstructed parameters of supernova neutrino fluxes at the neutrinosphere. We analyze in detail the features of this degeneracy and show how it occurs irrespective of the parametrization used for the distribution function. Given that this degeneracy is real we briefly comment on possible steps towards resolving it, which necessarily requires going beyond the setting presented here.
  • We calculate for the nearest active galactic nucleus (AGN), Centaurus A, the flux of high energy cosmic rays and of accompanying secondary photons and neutrinos expected from hadronic interactions in the source. We use as two basic models for the generation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) shock acceleration in the radio jet and acceleration in the regular electromagnetic field close to the core of the AGN. While scattering on photons dominates in scenarios with acceleration close to the core, scattering on gas becomes more important if acceleration takes place along the jet. Normalizing the UHECR flux from Centaurus A to the observations of the Auger experiment, the neutrino flux may be marginally observable in a 1 km$^3$ neutrino telescope, if a steep UHECR flux $\d N/\d E\propto E^{-\alpha}$ with $\alpha=2.7$ extends down to $10^{17}$ eV. The associated photon flux is close to or exceeds the observational data of atmospheric Cherenkov and $\gamma$-ray telescopes for $\alpha\gsim 2$. In particular, we find that already present data favour either a softer UHECR injection spectrum than $\alpha=2.7$ for Centaurus A or a lower UHECR flux than expected from the normalization to the Auger observations.
  • For neutrinos streaming from a supernova (SN) core, dense matter suppresses self-induced flavor transformations if the electron density n_e significantly exceeds the neutrino density n_nu in the conversion region. If n_e is comparable to n_nu one finds multi-angle decoherence, whereas the standard self-induced transformation behavior requires that in the transformation region n_nu is safely above n_e. This condition need not be satisfied in the early phase after supernova core bounce. Our new multi-angle effect is a subtle consequence of neutrinos traveling on different trajectories when streaming from a source that is not point-like.
  • We calculate the yield of high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical sources for arbitrary interaction depths $\tau_0$ and magnetic field strengths $B$. We take into account energy loss processes like synchrotron radiation and diffusion of charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields as well as the scattering of secondaries on background photons and the direct production of charm neutrinos. Meson-photon interactions are simulated with an extended version of the SOPHIA model. Diffusion leads to an increased path-length before protons leave the source of size R_s and therefore magnetized sources lose their transparency below the energy $E\sim 10^{18}{\rm eV} (R_s/{\rm pc}) (B/{\rm mG}) \tau_0^{1/\alpha}$, with $\alpha=1/3$ and 1 for Kolmogorov and Bohm diffusion, respectively. Moreover, the neutrino flux is suppressed above the energy where synchrotron energy losses become important for charged particles. As a consequence, the energy spectrum and the flavor composition of neutrinos are strongly modified both at low and high energies even for sources with $\tau_0\lsim 1$.
  • We analyze the possibility of probing non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI, for short) through the detection of neutrinos produced in a future galactic supernova (SN).We consider the effect of NSI on the neutrino propagation through the SN envelope within a three-neutrino framework, paying special attention to the inclusion of NSI-induced resonant conversions, which may take place in the most deleptonised inner layers. We study the possibility of detecting NSI effects in a Megaton water Cherenkov detector, either through modulation effects in the $\bar\nu_e$ spectrum due to (i) the passage of shock waves through the SN envelope, (ii) the time dependence of the electron fraction and (iii) the Earth matter effects; or, finally, through the possible detectability of the neutronization $\nu_e$ burst. We find that the $\bar\nu_e$ spectrum can exhibit dramatic features due to the internal NSI-induced resonant conversion. This occurs for non-universal NSI strengths of a few %, and for very small flavor-changing NSI above a few$\times 10^{-5}$.
  • We review how a high-statistics observation of the neutrino signal from a future galactic core-collapse supernova (SN) may be used to discriminate between different neutrino mixing scenarios. Most SN neutrinos are emitted in the accretion and cooling phase, during which the flavor-dependent differences of the emitted neutrino spectra are small and rather uncertain. Therefore the discrimination between neutrino mixing scenarios using these neutrinos should rely on observables independent of the SN neutrino spectra. We discuss two complementary methods that allow for the positive identification of the mass hierarchy without knowledge of the emitted neutrino fluxes, provided that the 13-mixing angle is large, $\sin^2\theta_{13}\gg 10^{-5}$. These two approaches are the observation of modulations in the neutrino spectra by Earth matter effects or by the passage of shock waves through the SN envelope. If the value of the 13-mixing angle is unknown, using additionally the information encoded in the prompt neutronization $\nu_e$ burst--a robust feature found in all modern SN simulations--can be sufficient to fix both the neutrino hierarchy and to decide whether $\theta_{13}$ is ``small'' or ``large.''
  • We calculate the yield of high energy neutrinos produced in astrophysical sources with negligible magnetic fields varying their interaction depth from nearly transparent to opaque. We take into account the scattering of secondaries on background photons as well as the direct production of neutrinos in decays of charm mesons. If multiple scattering of nucleons becomes important, the neutrino spectra from meson and muon decays are strongly modified with respect to transparent sources. Characteristic for neutrino sources containing photons as scattering targets is a strong energy-dependence of the ratio $R^0$ of $\nu_\mu$ and $\nu_e$ fluxes at the sources, ranging from $R^0=\phi_\mu/\phi_e\sim 0$ below threshold to $R^0\sim 4$ close to the energy where the decay length of charged pions and kaons equals their interaction length on target photons. Above this energy, the neutrino flux is strongly suppressed and depends mainly on charm production.
  • One of the robust features found in simulations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) is the prompt neutronization burst, i.e. the first $\sim 25$ milliseconds after bounce when the SN emits with very high luminosity mainly $\nu_e$ neutrinos. We examine the dependence of this burst on variations in the input of current SN models and find that recent improvements of the electron capture rates as well as uncertainties in the nuclear equation of state or a variation of the progenitor mass have only little effect on the signature of the neutronization peak in a megaton water Cherenkov detector for different neutrino mixing schemes. We show that exploiting the time-structure of the neutronization peak allows one to identify the case of a normal mass hierarchy and large 13-mixing angle $\theta_{13}$, where the peak is absent. The robustness of the predicted total event number in the neutronization burst makes a measurement of the distance to the SN feasible with a precision of about 5%, even in the likely case that the SN is optically obscured.
  • We review how a high-statistics observation of the neutrino signal from a future galactic core-collapse supernova (SN) may be used to discriminate between different neutrino mixing scenarios. Most SN neutrinos are emitted in the accretion and cooling phase, during which the flavor-dependent differences of the emitted neutrino spectra are small and rather uncertain. Therefore the discrimination between neutrino mixing scenarios using these neutrinos should rely on observables independent of the SN neutrino spectra. We discuss two complementary methods that allow for the positive identification of the mass hierarchy without knowledge of the emitted neutrino fluxes, provided that the 13-mixing angle is large, $\sin^2\theta_{13}\gg 10^{-5}$. These two approaches are the observation of modulations in the neutrino spectra by Earth matter effects or by the passage of shock waves through the SN envelope. If the value of the 13-mixing angle is unknown, using additionally the information encoded in the prompt neutronization $\nu_e$ burst--a robust feature found in all modern SN simulations--can be sufficient to fix both the neutrino hierarchy and to decide whether $\theta_{13}$ is ``small'' or ``large.''
  • A few seconds after bounce in a core-collapse supernova, the shock wave passes the density region corresponding to resonant neutrino oscillations with the ``atmospheric'' neutrino mass difference. The transient violation of the adiabaticity condition manifests itself in an observable modulation of the neutrino signal from a future galactic supernova. In addition to the shock wave propagation effects that were previously studied, a reverse shock forms when the supersonically expanding neutrino-driven wind collides with the slower earlier supernova ejecta. This implies that for some period the neutrinos pass two subsequent density discontinuities, giving rise to a ``double dip'' feature in the average neutrino energy as a function of time. We study this effect both analytically and numerically and find that it allows one to trace the positions of the forward and reverse shocks. We show that the energy dependent neutrino conversion probabilities allow one to detect oscillations even if the energy spectra of different neutrino flavors are the same as long as the fluxes differ. These features are observable in the \bar\nu_e signal for an inverted and in the \nu_e signal for a normal neutrino mass hierarchy, provided the 13-mixing angle is ``large'' (sin^2\theta_{13}\gg 10^{-5}).
  • The Earth matter effects on supernova (SN) neutrinos can be identified at a single detector through peaks in the Fourier transform of their ``inverse energy'' spectrum. The positions of these peaks are independent of the SN models and therefore the peaks can be used as a robust signature of the Earth matter effects, which in turn can distinguish between different neutrino mixing scenarios. Whereas only one genuine peak is observable when the neutrinos traverse only the Earth mantle, traversing also the core gives rise to multiple peaks. We calculate the strengths and positions of these peaks analytically and explore their features at a large scintillation detector as well as at a megaton water Cherenkov detector through Monte Carlo simulations. We propose a simple algorithm to identify the peaks in the actual data and quantify the chances of a peak identification as a function of the location of the SN in the sky.
  • A future galactic SN can be located several hours before the optical explosion through the MeV-neutrino burst, exploiting the directionality of $\nu$-$e$-scattering in a water Cherenkov detector such as Super-Kamiokande. We study the statistical efficiency of different methods for extracting the SN direction and identify a simple approach that is nearly optimal, yet independent of the exact SN neutrino spectra. We use this method to quantify the increase in the pointing accuracy by the addition of gadolinium to water, which tags neutrons from the inverse beta decay background. We also study the dependence of the pointing accuracy on neutrino mixing scenarios and initial spectra. We find that in the ``worst case'' scenario the pointing accuracy is $8^\circ$ at 95% C.L. in the absence of tagging, which improves to $3^\circ$ with a tagging efficiency of 95%. At a megaton detector, this accuracy can be as good as $0.6^\circ$. A TeV-neutrino burst is also expected to be emitted contemporaneously with the SN optical explosion, which may locate the SN to within a few tenths of a degree at a future km$^2$ high-energy neutrino telescope. If the SN is not seen in the electromagnetic spectrum, locating it in the sky through neutrinos is crucial for identifying the Earth matter effects on SN neutrino oscillations.