• Detailed information on the fission process can be inferred from the observation, modeling and theoretical understanding of prompt fission neutron and $\gamma$-ray~observables. Beyond simple average quantities, the study of distributions and correlations in prompt data, e.g., multiplicity-dependent neutron and \gray~spectra, angular distributions of the emitted particles, $n$-$n$, $n$-$\gamma$, and $\gamma$-$\gamma$~correlations, can place stringent constraints on fission models and parameters that would otherwise be free to be tuned separately to represent individual fission observables. The FREYA~and CGMF~codes have been developed to follow the sequential emissions of prompt neutrons and $\gamma$-rays~from the initial excited fission fragments produced right after scission. Both codes implement Monte Carlo techniques to sample initial fission fragment configurations in mass, charge and kinetic energy and sample probabilities of neutron and $\gamma$~emission at each stage of the decay. This approach naturally leads to using simple but powerful statistical techniques to infer distributions and correlations among many observables and model parameters. The comparison of model calculations with experimental data provides a rich arena for testing various nuclear physics models such as those related to the nuclear structure and level densities of neutron-rich nuclei, the $\gamma$-ray~strength functions of dipole and quadrupole transitions, the mechanism for dividing the excitation energy between the two nascent fragments near scission, and the mechanisms behind the production of angular momentum in the fragments, etc. Beyond the obvious interest from a fundamental physics point of view, such studies are also important for addressing data needs in various nuclear applications. (See text for full abstract.)
  • The event-by-event fission model FREYA has been improved, in particular to address deficiencies in the calculation of photon observables. We discuss the improvements that have been made and introduce several new variables, some detector dependent, that affect the photon observables. We show the sensitivity of FREYA to these variables. We then compare the results to the available photon data from spontaneous and thermal neutron-induced fission.
  • Predictions for cold nuclear matter effects on charged hadrons, identified light hadrons, quarkonium and heavy flavor hadrons, Drell-Yan dileptons, jets, photons, gauge bosons and top quarks produced in $p+$Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 8.16$ TeV are compiled and, where possible, compared to each other. Predictions of the normalized ratios of $p+$Pb to $p+p$ cross sections are also presented for most of the observables, providing new insights into the expected role of cold nuclear matter effects. In particular, the role of nuclear parton distribution functions on particle production can now be probed over a wider range of phase space than ever before.
  • Predictions made in Albacete {\it et al} prior to the LHC $p+$Pb run at $\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 5$ TeV are compared to currently available data. Some predictions shown here have been updated by including the same experimental cuts as the data. Some additional predictions are also presented, especially for quarkonia, that were provided to the experiments before the data were made public but were too late for the original publication are also shown here.
  • This report reviews the study of open heavy-flavour and quarkonium production in high-energy hadronic collisions, as tools to investigate fundamental aspects of Quantum Chromodynamics, from the proton and nucleus structure at high energy to deconfinement and the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Emphasis is given to the lessons learnt from LHC Run 1 results, which are reviewed in a global picture with the results from SPS and RHIC at lower energies, as well as to the questions to be addressed in the future. The report covers heavy flavour and quarkonium production in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. This includes discussion of the effects of hot and cold strongly interacting matter, quarkonium photo-production in nucleus-nucleus collisions and perspectives on the study of heavy flavour and quarkonium with upgrades of existing experiments and new experiments. The report results from the activity of the SaporeGravis network of the I3 Hadron Physics programme of the European Union 7th Framework Programme.
  • We explore the effects of shadowing on inclusive J/psi and Upsilon(1S) production at AFTER@LHC. We also present the rates as a function of p_T and rapidity for p+Pb and Pb+p collisions in the proposed AFTER@LHC rapidity acceptance.
  • We discuss a number of cold nuclear matter effects that can modify open heavy flavor and quarkonium production in proton-nucleus collisions and could thus also affect their production in nucleus-nucleus collisions, in addition to hot quark-gluon plasma production. We show some results for $p+$Pb collisions at sqrt s = 5 TeV at the LHC.
  • Background: Proton-nucleus collisions have been used as a intermediate baseline for the determination of cold medium effects. They lie between proton-proton collisions in vacuum and nucleus-nucleus collisions which are expected to be dominated by hot matter effects. Modifications of the quark densities in nuclei relative to those of the proton are well established although those of the gluons in the nucleus are not well understood. We focus on the effect of these on quarkonium production in proton-lead collisions at the LHC at a center of mass energy of 5.02 TeV.
  • We present a review of the state-of-the-art of our understanding of the intrinsic charm and bottom content of the nucleon. We discuss theoretical calculations, constraints from global analyses, and collider observables sensitive to the intrinsic heavy quark distributions. A particular emphasis is put on the potential of a high-energy and high-luminosity fixed target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC) to search for intrinsic charm.
  • We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to strongly-coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many research streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments.
  • The centrality dependence of sqrt(s_NN)= 200 GeV d+Au {J/\psi} data, measured in 12 rapidity bins that span -2.2 < y < 2.4, has been fitted using a model containing an effective absorption cross section combined with EPS09 NLO shadowing. The centrality dependence of the shadowing contribution was allowed to vary nonlinearly, employing a variety of assumptions, in an effort to explore the limits of what can be determined from the data. The impact parameter dependencies of the effective absorption cross section and the shadowing parameterization are sufficiently distinct to be determined separately. It is found that the onset of shadowing is a highly nonlinear function of impact parameter. The mid and backward rapidity absorption cross sections are compared with lower energy data and, for times of 0.05 fm/c or greater, data over a broad range of collision energies and rapidities are well described by a model in which the absorption cross section depends only on time spent in the nucleus.
  • Predictions for charged hadron, identified light hadron, quarkonium, photon, jet and gauge bosons in p+Pb collisions at sqrt s_NN = 5 TeV are compiled and compared. When test run data are available, they are compared to the model predictions.
  • We explore the available parameter space that gives reasonable fits to the total charm cross section to make a better estimate of its true uncertainty. We study the effect of the parameter choices on the energy dependence of the J/\psi\ cross section.
  • The dilepton invariant mass spectrum measured in heavy-ion collisions includes contributions from important QGP probes such as thermal radiation and the quarkonium ($J/\psi$, $\psi'$ and $\Upsilon$) states. Dileptons coming from hard $q \bar q$ scattering, the Drell-Yan process, contribute in all mass regions. In heavy-ion colliders, such as the LHC, semileptonic decays of heavy flavor hadrons provide a substantial contribution to the dilepton continuum. The dilepton continuum can give quantitative information about heavy quark yields and their modification in the medium and thus it is important to know all different sources which populate the continuum. In the present study, we calculate $c \bar c$ and $b \bar b$ production and determine their contributions to the dilepton continuum in Pb+Pb collisions at $\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 2.76$ TeV with and without including heavy quark energy loss. We also calculate the rates for Drell-Yan and thermal dilepton production. The contributions to the continuum from these dilepton sources are studied in the kinematic ranges relevant for the LHC detectors. The relatively high $p_T$ cutoff for single leptons excludes most dileptons produced by the thermal medium. Heavy flavors are the dominant source of dilepton production in all the kinematic regimes except at forward rapidities where Drell-Yan start dominating in high mass range beyond 10 GeV/$c^2$.
  • We assess the theoretical uncertainties on the inclusive J/psi production cross section in the Color Evaporation Model (CEM) using values for the charm quark mass, renormalization and factorization scales obtained from a fit to the charm production data. We use our new results to provide improved baseline comparison calculations at RHIC and the LHC. We also study cold matter effects on J/psi production at leading relative to next-to-leading order in the CEM within this approach.
  • We study the centrality dependence to be expected if only charmonium production in the corona survives in high energy nuclear collisions, with full suppression in the hot, deconfined core. To eliminate cold nuclear matter effects as far as possible, we consider the ratio of charmonium to open charm production. The centrality dependence of this ratio is found to follow a universal geometric form, applicable to both RHIC and LHC in collisions at central and forward rapidities.
  • The event-by-event fission model FREYA is extended to spontaneous fission of actinides and a variety of neutron observables are studied for spontaneous fission and fission induced by thermal neutrons with a view towards possible applications for detection of special nuclear materials.
  • We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarisation studies. Thereafter, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in a broader perspective, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.
  • Earlier studies of 239Pu(n, f) have been extended to incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV within the framework of the event-by-event fission model FREYA, into which we have incorporated multichance fission and pre-equilibrium neutron emission. The main parameters controlling prompt fission neutron evaporation have been identified and the prompt fission neutron spectrum has been analyzed by fitting those parameters to the average neutron multiplicity nubar from ENDF-B/VII.0, including the energy-energy correlations in nubar(E) obtained by fitting to the experimental nubar data used in the ENDF-B/VII.0 evaluation. We present our results, discuss relevant tests of this new evaluation, and describe possible further improvements.
  • Proton-nucleus (p+A) collisions have long been recognized as a crucial component of the physics programme with nuclear beams at high energies, in particular for their reference role to interpret and understand nucleus-nucleus data as well as for their potential to elucidate the partonic structure of matter at low parton fractional momenta (small-x). Here, we summarize the main motivations that make a proton-nucleus run a decisive ingredient for a successful heavy-ion programme at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and we present unique scientific opportunities arising from these collisions. We also review the status of ongoing discussions about operation plans for the p+A mode at the LHC.
  • A golden age for heavy quarkonium physics dawned a decade ago, initiated by the confluence of exciting advances in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and an explosion of related experimental activity. The early years of this period were chronicled in the Quarkonium Working Group (QWG) CERN Yellow Report (YR) in 2004, which presented a comprehensive review of the status of the field at that time and provided specific recommendations for further progress. However, the broad spectrum of subsequent breakthroughs, surprises, and continuing puzzles could only be partially anticipated. Since the release of the YR, the BESII program concluded only to give birth to BESIII; the $B$-factories and CLEO-c flourished; quarkonium production and polarization measurements at HERA and the Tevatron matured; and heavy-ion collisions at RHIC have opened a window on the deconfinement regime. All these experiments leave legacies of quality, precision, and unsolved mysteries for quarkonium physics, and therefore beg for continuing investigations. The plethora of newly-found quarkonium-like states unleashed a flood of theoretical investigations into new forms of matter such as quark-gluon hybrids, mesonic molecules, and tetraquarks. Measurements of the spectroscopy, decays, production, and in-medium behavior of c\bar{c}, b\bar{b}, and b\bar{c} bound states have been shown to validate some theoretical approaches to QCD and highlight lack of quantitative success for others. The intriguing details of quarkonium suppression in heavy-ion collisions that have emerged from RHIC have elevated the importance of separating hot- and cold-nuclear-matter effects in quark-gluon plasma studies. This review systematically addresses all these matters and concludes by prioritizing directions for ongoing and future efforts.
  • The charmonium yields are expected to be considerably suppressed if a deconfined medium is formed in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. In addition, the bottomonium states, with the possible exception of the Upsilon(1S) state, are also expected to be suppressed in heavy-ion collisions. However, in proton-nucleus collisions the quarkonium production cross sections, even those of the Upsilon(1S), are also suppressed. These "cold nuclear matter" effects need to be accounted for before signals of the high density QCD medium can be identified in the measurements made in nucleus-nucleus collisions. We identify two cold nuclear matter effects important for midrapidity quarkonium production: "nuclear absorption", typically characterized as a final-state effect on the produced quarkonium state and shadowing, the modification of the parton densities in nuclei relative to the nucleon, an initial-state effect. We characterize these effects and study the energy, rapidity, and impact-parameter dependence of initial-state shadowing in this paper.
  • Employing a recently developed Monte Carlo model, we study the fission of 240Pu induced by neutrons with energies from thermal to just below the threshold for second chance fission. Current measurements of the mean number of prompt neutrons emitted in fission, together with less accurate measurements of the neutron energy spectra, place remarkably fine constraints on predictions of microscopic calculations. In particular, the total excitation energy of the nascent fragments must be specified to within 1 MeV to avoid disagreement with measurements of the mean neutron multiplicity. The combination of the Monte Carlo fission model with a statistical likelihood analysis also presents a powerful tool for the evaluation of fission neutron data. Of particular importance is the fission spectrum, which plays a key role in determining reactor criticality. We show that our approach can be used to develop an estimate of the fission spectrum with uncertainties several times smaller than current experimental uncertainties for outgoing neutron energies up to 2 MeV.
  • The increased interest in more exclusive fission observables has demanded more detailed models. We present here a new computational model, FREYA, that aims to meet this need by producing large samples of complete fission events from which any observable of interest can then be extracted consistently, including arbitrary correlations. The various model assumptions are described and the potential utility of the model is illustrated by means of several novel correlation observables.
  • Numerably contractible spaces play an important role in the theory of homotopy pushouts and pullbacks. The corresponding results imply that a number of well known weak homotopy equivalences are genuine ones if numerably contractible spaces are involved. In this paper we give a first systematic investigation of numerably contractible spaces. We list the elementary properties of the category of these spaces. We then study simplicial objects in this category. In particular, we show that the topological realization functor preserves fibration sequences if the base is path-connected and numerably contractible in each dimension. Consequently, the loop space functor commutes with realization up to homotopy. We give simple conditions which assure that free algebras over a topological operad are numerably contractible.