• We present radio observations of the afterglow of the bright gamma-ray burst GRB980329 made between one month and several years after the burst, a re-analysis of previously published submillimeter data, and late-time optical and near-infrared (NIR) observations of the host galaxy. From the absence of a spectral break in the optical/NIR colors of the host galaxy, we exclude the earlier suggestion that GRB980329 lies at a redshift of z >~5. We combine our data with the numerous multi-wavelength observations of the early afterglow, fit a comprehensive afterglow model to the entire broadband dataset, and derive fundamental physical parameters of the blast-wave and its host environment. Models for which the ejecta expand isotropically require both a high circumburst density and extreme radiative losses from the shock. No low density model (n << 10 cm^{-3}) fits the data. A burst with a total energy of ~ 10^{51} erg, with the ejecta narrowly collimated to an opening angle of a few degrees, driven into a surrounding medium with density ~ 20 cm^{-3}, provides a satisfactory fit to the lightcurves over a range of redshifts.
  • We use the NIRSPEC near-IR spectrometer on Keck II to obtain moderate resolution (R = 1540) spectroscopy that shows conclusively that the C IV emission line in the z = 5.74 quasar SDSSp J104433.04-012502.2 is accompanied by broad, blueshifted C IV absorption. The line has a "balnicity index" of 900 km/s and a rest-frame equivalent width of 13.1 +/- 1.3 relative to the continuum. This confirms its membership in the class of objects called "broad-absorption line" (BAL) QSOs. SDSSP J1044-0125 was previously suggested to be a BAL QSO based on its larger UV-to-X-ray flux ratio than most non-BAL QSOs. The C IV emission is of normal strength, implying a metallicity similar to that found in other, lower-redshift QSOs.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most brilliant objects in the Universe but efforts to estimate the total energy released in the explosion -- a crucial physical quantity -- have been stymied by their unknown geometry: spheres or cones. We report on a comprehensive analysis of GRB afterglows and derive their conical opening angles. We find that the gamma-ray energy release, corrected for geometry, is narrowly clustered around 5x10**50 erg. We draw three conclusions. First, the central engines of GRBs release energies that are comparable to ordinary supernovae, suggesting a connection. Second, the wide variation in fluence and luminosity of GRBs is due entirely to a distribution of opening angles. Third, only a small fraction of GRBs are visible to a given observer and the true GRB rate is at least a factor of 500 times larger than the observed rate.
  • In classifying the ensemble of powerful extragalactic radio sources, considerable evidence has accumulated that radio galaxies and quasars are orientation-dependent manifestations of the same parent population: massive spheroidal galaxies containing correspondingly massive black holes. [...] In this study, we exploit the opportunity to eliminate the quasar glare by performing sensitive spectropolarimetry with the Keck II telescope of a sample of radio galaxies with redshifts around 2.5. [...] We show that dust-reflected quasar light generally dominates the restframe ultraviolet continuum of these sources and that a highly clumped scattering medium results in almost grey scattering of the active galactic nucleus photons. The observations, however, do not exclude a substantial star formation rate averaged over a Gyr of evolution. The sub-mm reradiation from the scattering dust is likely to represent only a small fraction (~10%) of the total far infrared luminosity. An analysis of the emission lines excited in the interstellar medium of the host galaxy by the hard quasar radiation field reveals evidence of a dramatic chemical evolution within the spheroid during this epoch. Secondary nitrogen production in intermediate mass stars produces a characteristic signature in the NV/CIV and NV/HeII line ratios which has been seen previously in the broad line region of quasars at similar redshifts. We find intriguing correlations between the strengths of the Ly alpha and NV emission lines and the degree of ultraviolet continuum polarization which may represent the dispersal of dust associated with the chemical enrichment of the spheroid.
  • Gamma-ray burst astronomy has undergone a revolution in the last three years, spurred by the discovery of fading long-wavelength counterparts. We now know that at least the long duration GRBs lie at cosmological distances with estimated electromagnetic energy release of 10**51 -- 10**53 erg, making these the brightest explosions in the Universe. In this article we review the current observational state, beginning with the statistics of X-ray, optical, and radio afterglow detections. We then discuss the insights these observations have given to the progenitor population, the energetics of the GRB events, and the physics of the afterglow emission. We focus particular attention on the evidence linking GRBs to the explosion of massive stars. Throughout, we identify remaining puzzles and uncertainties, and emphasize promising observational tools for addressing them. The imminent launch of HETE-2 and the increasingly sophisticated and coordinated ground-based and space-based observations have primed this field for fantastic growth.
  • We present a deep ASCA observation of a Broad Absorption Line Quasar (BALQSO) PG0946+301. The source was clearly detected in one of the gas imaging spectrometers, but not in any other detector. If BALQSOs have intrinsic X-ray spectra similar to normal radio-quiet quasars, our observations imply that there is Thomson thick X-ray absorption (N_H >~10^{24} cm^{-2}) toward PG0946+301. This is the largest column density estimated so far toward a BALQSO. The absorber must be at least partially ionized and may be responsible for attenuation in the optical and UV. If the Thomson optical depth toward BALQSOs is close to one, as inferred here, then spectroscopy in hard X-rays with large telescopes like XMM would be feasible.
  • We report the discovery of a radio transient VLA 232937.2-235553, coincident with the proposed X-ray afterglow for the gamma-ray burst GRB 981226. This GRB has the highest ratio of X-ray to gamma-ray fluence of all the GRBs detected by BeppoSAX so far and yet no corresponding optical transient was detected. The radio light curve of VLA 232937.2-235553 is qualitatively similar to that of several other radio afterglows. At the sub-arcsecond position provided by the radio detection, optical imaging reveals an extended R=24.9 mag object, which we identify as the host galaxy of GRB 981226. Afterglow models which invoke a jet-like geometry for the outflow or require an ambient medium with a radial density dependence, such as that produced by a wind from a massive star, are both consistent with the radio data. Furthermore, we show that the observed properties of the radio afterglow can explain the absence of an optical transient without the need for large extinction local to the GRB.
  • We present a spectropolarimetric survey of 36 broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects (BAL QSOs). The continuum, absorption trough, and emission line polarization of BAL QSOs yield clues about their structure. We confirm that BAL QSOs are in general more highly polarized than non-BAL QSOs, consistent with a more equatorial viewing direction for the former than the latter. We have identified two new highly-polarized QSOs in our sample (1232+1325 and 1333+2840). The polarization rises weakly to the blue in most objects, perhaps due to scattering and absorption by dust particles. We find that a polarization increase in the BAL troughs is a general property of polarized BAL QSOs, indicating an excess of scattered light relative to direct light, and consistent with the unification of BAL QSOs and non-BAL QSOs. We have also discovered evidence of resonantly scattered photons in the red wing of the C IV broad emission lines of a few objects. In most cases, the broad emission lines have lower polarization and a different position angle than the continuum. The polarization characteristics of low-ionization BAL QSOs are similar to those of high-ionization BAL QSOs, suggesting a similar BAL wind geometry.
  • Polarimetry of the narrow-line radio galaxy PKS 0116+082 at the W.M. Keck telescope shows that it has high and variable optical polarization, presumably due to synchrotron radiation. It is not a BL Lac object because it has strong narrow lines, and it is not an OVV quasar because it has no broad lines and the extended galaxy is prominent. VLA and VLBA images show that it is a compact steep-spectrum radio source with most of the emission coming from a region less than 100 milli-arcsec in size. Of the 25 compact steep-spectrum or gigahertz peaked-spectrum sources measured polarimetrically, four have high optical polarization. One of these has been observed only once but in the other three the polarization is variable. This gives an intriguing hint that variability may be a general property of these objects.
  • We have discovered scattered broad Balmer emission lines in the spectrum of Cygnus A, using the Keck II telescope. Broad H-alpha appears in polarized flux from components on either side of the nucleus, and to a lesser extent in the nucleus. The full-width at half-maximum of broad H-alpha is 26,000 km/s, comparable to the widest emission lines seen in broad-line radio galaxies. Scattered AGN light provides a significant contribution to the total flux at 3800 Angstroms (rest) of the western component, where the polarization rises to 16%. The spatially integrated flux of Cygnus A at 5500 Angstroms can be decomposed into an elliptical galaxy fraction (Fg=0.70), a highly polarized blue component (FC1=0.15), a less polarized red component (FC=0.09), and a contribution from the nebular continuum (0.06). Imaging polarimetry shows a double fan of polarization vectors with circular symmetry which corresponds to the ionization cone seen in HST images. Our results are consistent with scattering of light from a hidden quasar of modest luminosity by an extended, dusty narrow-line region.