• In a recent work devoted to the magnetism of Li$_{2}$CuO$_{2}$, Shu et al. [New J. Phys. 19 (2017) 023026] have proposed a "simplified" unfrustrated microscopic model that differs considerably from the models refined through decades of prior work. We show that the proposed model is at odds with known experimental data, including the reported magnetic susceptibility $\chi(T)$ data up to 550~K. Using an 8$^{\rm th}$ order high-temperature expansion for $\chi(T)$, we show that the experimental data for Li$_{2}$CuO$_{2}$ are consistent with the prior model derived from inelastic neutron scattering (INS) studies. We also establish the $T$-range of validity for a Curie-Weiss law for the real frustrated magnetic system. We argue that the knowledge of the long-range ordered magnetic structure for $T<T_N$ and of $\chi(T)$ in a restricted $T$-range provides insufficient information to extract all of the relevant couplings in frustrated magnets; the saturation field and INS data must also be used to determine several exchange couplings, including the weak but decisive frustrating antiferromagnetic (AFM) interchain couplings.
  • The electronic ground state in many iridate materials is described by a complex wave-function in which spin and orbital angular momenta are entangled due to relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Such a localized electronic state carries an effective total angular momentum of $J_{eff}=1/2$. In materials with an edge-sharing octahedral crystal structure, such as the honeycomb iridates Li2IrO3 and Na2IrO3, these $J_{eff}=1/2$ moments are expected to be coupled through a special bond-dependent magnetic interaction, which is a necessary condition for the realization of a Kitaev quantum spin liquid. However, this relativistic electron picture is challenged by an alternate description, in which itinerant electrons are confined to a benzene-like hexagon, keeping the system insulating despite the delocalized nature of the electrons. In this quasi-molecular orbital (QMO) picture, the honeycomb iridates are an unlikely choice for a Kitaev spin liquid. Here we show that the honeycomb iridate Li2IrO3 is best described by a $J_{eff}=1/2$ state at ambient pressure, but crosses over into a QMO state under the application of small (~ 0.1 GPa) hydrostatic pressure. This result illustrates that the physics of iridates is extremely rich due to a delicate balance between electronic bandwidth, spin-orbit coupling, crystal field, and electron correlation.
  • Magnetization and high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements of the Kitaev-Heisenberg material alpha-RuCl3 reveal a pressure-induced crystallographic and magnetic phase transition at a hydrostatic pressure of p=0.2 GPa. The structural transition into the triclinic high-pressure Phase is characterized by a very strong dimerization of the Ru-Ru bonds, accompanied by a collapse of the magnetic susceptibility. Ab initio quantum-chemistry calculations disclose a pressure-induced enhancement of the direct 4d-4d bonding on particular Ru-Ru links, causing a sharp increase of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg exchange interactions. These combined experimental and computational data show that the high-pressure nonmagnetic phase of alpha-RuCl3 is a valence bond Crystal formed by strongly bound spin singlets.
  • Temperature-pressure phase diagram of the Kitaev hyperhoneycomb iridate $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ is explored using magnetization, thermal expansion, magnetostriction, and muon spin rotation ($\mu$SR) measurements, as well as single-crystal x-ray diffraction under pressure and ab initio calculations. The Neel temperature of $\beta$-Li$_2$IrO$_3$ increases with the slope of 0.9 K/GPa upon initial compression, but the reduction in the polarization field $H_c$ reflects a growing instability of the incommensurate order. At 1.4 GPa, the ordered state breaks down upon a first-order transition giving way to a new ground state marked by the coexistence of dynamically correlated and frozen spins. This partial freezing in the absence of any conspicuous structural defects may indicate classical nature of the resulting pressure-induced spin liquid, an observation paralleled to the increase in the nearest-neighbor off-diagonal exchange $\Gamma$ under pressure.
  • M dwarfs are the most numerous stars in our Galaxy with masses between approximately 0.5 and 0.1 solar mass. Many of them show surface activity qualitatively similar to our Sun and generate flares, high X-ray fluxes, and large-scale magnetic fields. Such activity is driven by a dynamo powered by the convective motions in their interiors. Understanding properties of stellar magnetic fields in these stars finds a broad application in astrophysics, including, e.g., theory of stellar dynamos and environment conditions around planets that may be orbiting these stars. Most stars with convective envelopes follow a rotation-activity relationship where various activity indicators saturate in stars with rotation periods shorter than a few days. The activity gradually declines with rotation rate in stars rotating more slowly. It is thought that due to a tight empirical correlation between X-ray and magnetic flux, the stellar magnetic fields will also saturate, to values around ~4kG. Here we report the detection of magnetic fields above the presumed saturation limit in four fully convective M-dwarfs. By combining results from spectroscopic and polarimetric studies we explain our findings in terms of bistable dynamo models: stars with the strongest magnetic fields are those in a dipole dynamo state, while stars in a multipole state cannot generate fields stronger than about four kilogauss. Our study provides observational evidence that dynamo in fully convective M dwarfs generates magnetic fields that can differ not only in the geometry of their large scale component, but also in the total magnetic energy.
  • Nd0.05Ce0.95CoIn5 features a magnetic field-driven quantum phase transition that separates two antiferromagnetic phases with an identical magnetic structure inside the superconducting condensate. Using neutron diffraction we demonstrate that the population of the two magnetic domains in the two phases is affected differently by the rotation of the magnetic field in the tetragonal basal plane. In the low-field SDW-phase the domain population is only weakly affected while in the high-field Q-phase they undergo a sharp switch for fields around the a-axis. Our results provide evidence that the anisotropic spin susceptibility in both phases arises ultimately from spin-orbit interactions but are qualitatively different in the two phases. This provides evidence that the electronic structure is changed at the quantum phase transition, which yields a modified coupling between magnetism and superconductivity in the Q-phase.
  • Deep optical photometric data on the NGC 7538 region were collected and combined with archival data sets from $Chandra$, 2MASS and {\it Spitzer} surveys in order to generate a new catalog of young stellar objects (YSOs) including those not showing IR excess emission. This new catalog is complete down to 0.8 M$_\odot$. The nature of the YSOs associated with the NGC 7538 region and their spatial distribution are used to study the star formation process and the resultant mass function (MF) in the region. Out of the 419 YSOs, $\sim$91\% have ages between 0.1 to 2.5 Myr and $\sim$86\% have masses between 0.5 to 3.5 M$_\odot$, as derived by spectral energy distribution fitting analysis. Around 24\%, 62\% and 2\% of these YSOs are classified to be the Class I, Class II and Class III sources, respectively. The X-ray activity in the Class I, Class II and Class III objects is not significantly different from each other. This result implies that the enhanced X-ray surface flux due to the increase in the rotation rate may be compensated by the decrease in the stellar surface area during the pre-main sequence evolution. Our analysis shows that the O3V type high mass star `IRS 6' might have triggered the formation of young low mass stars up to a radial distance of 3 pc. The MF shows a turn-off at around 1.5 M$_\odot$ and the value of its slope `$\Gamma$' in the mass range $1.5 <$M/M$_\odot < 6$ comes out to be $-1.76\pm0.24$, which is steeper than the Salpeter value.
  • Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully-convective M-star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.
  • We perform spectral simulations of dynamo for magnetic Prandtl number of one with Taylor-Green forcing. We observe dynamo transition through a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. Beyond the transition, the numerical simulations reveal complex dynamo states with windows of constant, periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. For some forcing amplitudes, multiple attractors were obtained for different initial conditions. We show that one of the chaotic windows follows the period-doubling route to chaos.