• We study the constraints that electroweak precision data can impose, after the discovery of the Higgs boson by the LHC, on neutrinophilic two-Higgs-doublet models which comprise one extra $SU(2)\times U(1)$ doublet and a new symmetry, namely a spontaneously broken $\mathbb{Z}_2$ or a softly broken global $U(1)$. In these models the extra Higgs doublet, via its very small vacuum expectation value, is the sole responsible for neutrino masses. We find that the model with a $\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry is basically ruled out by electroweak precision data, even if the model is slightly extended to include extra right-handed neutrinos, due to the presence of a very light scalar. While the other model is still perfectly viable, the parameter space is considerably constrained by current data, specially by the $T$ parameter. In particular, the new charged and neutral scalars must have very similar masses.
  • We discuss how the lepton CP phase can be constrained by accelerator and reactor measurements in an era without dedicated experiments for CP violation search. To characterize globally the sensitivity to the CP phase \delta_{CP}, we introduce a new measure, the CP exclusion fraction, which quantifies what fraction of the \delta_{CP} space can be excluded at a given input values of \theta_{23} and \delta_{CP}. Using the measure we study the CP sensitivity which may be possessed by the accelerator experiments T2K and NOvA. We show that, if the mass hierarchy is known, T2K and NOvA alone may exclude, respectively, about 50%-60% and 40%-50% of the \delta_{CP} space at 90% CL by 10 years running, provided that a considerable fraction of beam time is devoted to the antineutrino run. The synergy between T2K and NOvA is remarkable, leading to the determination of the mass hierarchy through CP sensitivity at the same CL.
  • In view of the advent of large-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube, the future Hyper-Kamiokande and the ones proposed for the Laguna project in Europe, we re-examine the determination of the directional position of a Galactic supernova by means of its neutrinos using the triangulation method. We study the dependence of the pointing accuracy on the arrival time resolution of supernova neutrinos at different detectors. For a failed supernova, we expect better results due to the abrupt termination of the neutrino emission which allows one to measure the arrival time with higher precision. We found that for the time resolution of $\pm$ 2 (4) ms, the supernova can be located with a precision of $\sim$ 5 (10)$^\circ$ on the declination and of $\sim$ 8 (15)$^\circ$ on the right ascension angle, if we combine the observations from detectors at four different sites.
  • We analyze the neutrino mass matrix entries and their correlations in a probabilistic fashion, constructing probability distribution functions using the latest results from neutrino oscillation fits. Two cases are considered: the standard three neutrino scenario as well as the inclusion of a new sterile neutrino that potentially explains the reactor and gallium anomalies. We discuss the current limits and future perspectives on the mass matrix elements that can be useful for model building.
  • The construction of the Agua Negra tunnels that will link Argentina and Chile under the Andes, the world longest mountain range, opens the possibility to build the first deep underground labo- ratory in the Southern Hemisphere. This laboratory has the acronym ANDES (Agua Negra Deep Experiment Site) and its overburden could be as large as \sim 1.7 km of rock, or 4500 mwe, providing an excellent low background environment to study physics of rare events like the ones induced by neutrinos and/or dark matter. In this paper we investigate the physics potential of a few kiloton size liquid scintillator detector, which could be constructed in the ANDES laboratory as one of its possible scientific programs. In particular, we evaluate the impact of such a detector for the studies of geoneutrinos and galactic supernova neutrinos assuming a fiducial volume of 3 kilotons as a reference size. We emphasize the complementary roles of such a detector to the ones in the Northern Hemisphere neutrino facilities through some advantages due to its geographical location.
  • We consider an alternative explanation for the deficit of nu_e in Ga solar neutrino calibration experiments and of the anti nu_e in short baseline reactor experiments by a model where neutrinos can oscillate into sterile Kaluza-Klein modes that can propagate in compactified sub-micrometer flat extra dimensions. We have analyzed the results of the Gallium radioactive source experiments and 19 reactor experiments with baseline shorter than 100 m, and showed that these data can be fitted into this scenario. The values of the lightest neutrino mass and of the size of the largest extra dimension that are compatible with these experiments are mostly not excluded by other neutrino oscillation experiments.
  • The lepton mixing angle theta_13, the only unknown angle in the standard three-flavor neutrino mixing scheme, is finally measured by the recent reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments. We perform a combined analysis of the data coming from T2K, MINOS, Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO experiments and find sin^2 2theta_13 = 0.096 \pm 0.013 (\pm 0.040) at 1 sigma (3 sigma) CL and that the hypothesis theta_13 = 0 is now rejected at a significance level of 7.7 sigma. We also discuss the near future expectation on the precision of the theta_13 determination by using expected data from these ongoing experiments.
  • In the framework of gauged flavour symmetries, new fermions in parity symmetric representations of the standard model are generically needed for the compensation of mixed anomalies. The key point is that their masses are also protected by flavour symmetries and some of them are expected to lie way below the flavour symmetry breaking scale(s), which has to occur many orders of magnitude above the electroweak scale to be compatible with the available data from flavour changing neutral currents and CP violation experiments. We argue that, actually, some of these fermions would plausibly get masses within the LHC range. If they are taken to be heavy quarks and leptons, in (bi)-fundamental representations of the standard model symmetries, their mixings with the light ones are strongly constrained to be very small by electroweak precision data. The alternative chosen here is to exactly forbid such mixings by breaking of flavour symmetries into an exact discrete symmetry, the so-called proton-hexality, primarily suggested to avoid proton decay. As a consequence of the large value needed for the flavour breaking scale, those heavy particles are long-lived and rather appropriate for the current and future searches at the LHC for quasi-stable hadrons and leptons. In fact, the LHC experiments have already started to look for them.
  • If the neutrino analogue of the M\"ossbauer effect, namely, recoiless emission and resonant capture of neutrinos is realized, one can study neutrino oscillations with much shorter baselines and smaller source/detector size when compared to conventional experiments. In this work, we discuss the potential of such a M\"ossbauer neutrino oscillation experiment to probe nonstandard neutrino properties coming from some new physics beyond the standard model. We investigate four scenarios for such new physics that modify the standard oscillation pattern. We consider the existence of a light sterile neutrino that can mix with \bar \nu_e, the existence of a Kaluza-Klein tower of sterile neutrinos that can mix with the flavor neutrinos in a model with large flat extra dimensions, neutrino oscillations with nonstandard quantum decoherence and mass varying neutrinos, and discuss to which extent one can constrain these scenarios. We also discuss the impact of such new physics on the determination of the standard oscillation parameters.
  • We consider a model where right-handed neutrinos propagate in a large compactified extra dimension, engendering Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes, while the standard model particles are restricted to the usual 4-dimensional brane. A mass term mixes the KK modes with the standard left-handed neutrinos, opening the possibility of change the 3 generation mixing pattern. We derive bounds on the maximum size of the extra dimension from neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that this model provides a possible explanation for the deficit of nu_e in Ga solar neutrino calibration experiments and of the anti-nu_e in short baseline reactor experiments.
  • We consider a model where sterile neutrinos can propagate in a large compactified extra dimension giving rise to Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes and the standard model left-handed neutrinos are confined to a 4-dimensional spacetime brane. The KK modes mix with the standard neutrinos modifying their oscillation pattern. We examine former and current experiments such as CHOOZ, KamLAND, and MINOS to estimate the impact of the possible presence of such KK modes on the determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters and simultaneously obtain limits on the size of the largest extra dimension. We found that the presence of the KK modes does not essentially improve the quality of the fit compared to the case of the standard oscillation. By combining the results from CHOOZ, KamLAND and MINOS, in the limit of a vanishing lightest neutrino mass, we obtain the stronger bound on the size of the extra dimension as ~ 1.0(0.6) micrometer at 99% C. L. for normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. If the lightest neutrino mass turn out to be larger, 0.2 eV, for example, we obtain the bound ~ 0.1 micrometer. We also discuss the expected sensitivities on the size of the extra dimension for future experiments such as Double CHOOZ, T2K and NOvA.
  • We consider a model where sterile neutrinos can propagate in a large compactified extra dimension (a) giving rise to Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes and the Standard Model left-handed neutrinos are confined to a 4-dimensional spacetime brane. The KK modes mix with the standard neutrinos modifying their oscillation pattern. We examine current experiments in this framework obtaining stringent limits on a.
  • In neutrino oscillation with non-standard interactions (NSI) the system is enriched with CP violation caused by phases due to NSI in addition to the standard lepton Kobayashi-Maskawa phase \delta. In this paper we show that it is possible to disentangle the two CP violating effects by measurement of muon neutrino appearance by a near-far two detector setting in neutrino factory experiments. Prior to the quantitative analysis we investigate in detail the various features of the neutrino oscillations with NSI, but under the assumption that only one of the NSI elements, \epsilon_{e \mu} or \epsilon_{e \tau}, is present. They include synergy between the near and the far detectors, the characteristic differences between the \epsilon_{e \mu} and \epsilon_{e\tau} systems, and in particular, the parameter degeneracy. Finally, we use a concrete setting with the muon energy of 50 GeV and magnetized iron detectors at two baselines, one at L=3000 km and the other at L=7000 km, each having a fiducial mass of 50 kton to study the discovery potential of NSI and its CP violation effects. We demonstrate, by assuming 4 \times 10^{21} useful muon decays for both polarities, that one can identify non-standard CP violation down to | epsilon_{e \mu} | \simeq \text{a few} \times 10^{-3}, and | \epsilon_{e \tau} | \simeq 10^{-2} at 3\sigma CL for \theta_{13} down to \sin^2 2\theta_{13} = 10^{-4} in most of the region of \delta. The impact of the existence of NSI on the measurement of \delta and the mass hierarchy is also worked out.
  • We have investigated the impact of long-range forces induced by unparticle operators of scalar, vector and tensor nature coupled to fermions in the interpretation of solar neutrinos and KamLAND data. If the unparticle couplings to the neutrinos are mildly non-universal, such long-range forces will not factorize out in the neutrino flavour evolution. As a consequence large deviations from the observed standard matter-induced oscillation pattern for solar neutrinos would be generated. In this case, severe limits can be set on the infrared fix point scale, Lambda_u, and the new physics scale, M, as a function of the ultraviolet (d_UV) and anomalous (d) dimension of the unparticle operator. For a scalar unparticle, for instance, assuming the non-universality of the lepton couplings to unparticles to be of the order of a few per mil we find that, for d_UV=3 and d=1.1, M is constrained to be M > O(10^9) TeV (M > O(10^10) TeV) if Lambda_u= 1 TeV (10 TeV). For given values of Lambda_u and d, the corresponding bounds on M for vector [tensor] unparticles are approximately 100 [3/Sqrt(Lambda_u/TeV)] times those for the scalar case. Conversely, these results can be translated into severe constraints on universality violation of the fermion couplings to unparticle operators with scales which can be accessible at future colliders.
  • We discuss the sensitivity reach of a neutrino factory measurement to non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI), which may exist as a low-energy manifestation of physics beyond the Standard Model. We use the muon appearance mode \nu_e --> \nu_\mu and consider two detectors, one at 3000 km and the other at 7000 km. Assuming the effects of NSI at the production and the detection are negligible, we discuss the sensitivities to NSI and the simultaneous determination of \theta_{13} and \delta by examining the effects in the neutrino propagation of various systems in which two NSI parameters \epsilon_{\alpha \beta} are switched on. The sensitivities to off-diagonal \epsilon's are found to be excellent up to small values of \theta_{13}. We demonstrate that the two-detector setting is powerful enough to resolve the \theta_{13}-NSI confusion problem. We believe that the results obtained in this paper open the door to the possibility of using neutrino factory as a discovery machine for NSI while keeping its primary function of performing precision measurements of the lepton mixing parameters.
  • In this work we study the phenomenological consequences of the existence of long-range forces coupled to lepton flavour numbers in solar neutrino oscillations. We study electronic forces mediated by scalar, vector or tensor neutral bosons and analyze their effect on the propagation of solar neutrinos as a function of the force strength and range. Under the assumption of one mass scale dominance, we perform a global analysis of solar and KamLAND neutrino data which depends on the two standard oscillation parameters, \Delta m^2_{21} and \tan^2\theta_{12}, the force coupling constant, its range and, for the case of scalar-mediated interactions, on the neutrino mass scale as well. We find that, generically, the inclusion of the new interaction does not lead to a very statistically significant improvement on the description of the data in the most favored MSW LMA (or LMA-I) region. It does, however, substantially improve the fit in the high-\Delta m^2 LMA (or LMA-II) region which can be allowed for vector and scalar lepto-forces (in this last case if neutrinos are very hierarchical) at 2.5\sigma. Conversely, the analysis allows us to place stringent constraints on the strength versus range of the leptonic interaction.
  • Recently a new method for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the effective values of the atmospheric \Delta m^2 measured in the electron neutrino disappearance channel, \Delta m^2(ee), with the one measured in the muon neutrino disappearance channel, \Delta m^2(\mu \mu), was proposed. If \Delta m^2(ee) is larger (smaller) than \Delta m^2(\mu \mu) the hierarchy is of the normal (inverted) type. We re-examine this proposition in the light of two very high precision measurements: \Delta m^2(\mu \mu) that may be accomplished by the phase II of the Tokai-to-Kamioka (T2K) experiment, for example, and \Delta m^2(ee) that can be envisaged using the novel Mossbauer enhanced resonant \bar\nu_e absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic uncertainties of both measurements, we estimate the parameter region of (\theta_13, \delta) in which the mass hierarchy can be determined. If \theta_13 is relatively large, sin^2 2\theta_13 \gsim 0.05, and both of \Delta m^2(ee) and \Delta m^2(\mu \mu) can be measured with the precision of \sim 0.5 % it is possible to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at > 95% CL for 0.3 \pi \lsim \delta \lsim 1.7 \pi for the current best fit values of all the other oscillation parameters.
  • In this work we study the phenomenological consequences of the environment dependence of neutrino mass on solar and reactor neutrino phenomenology. Such dependence can be induced, for example, by Yukawa interactions with a light scalar particle which couples to neutrinos and matter and it is expected, among others, in mass varying neutrino scenarios. Under the assumption of one mass scale dominance, we perform a global analysis of solar and KamLAND neutrino data which depends on 4 parameters: the two standard oscillation parameters, Delta m^2 and tan^2(theta), and two new coefficients, which parameterize the environment dependence of the neutrino mass. We find that, generically, the inclusion of the environment dependent terms does not lead to a very statistically significant improvement on the description of the data in the most favoured MSW LMA (or LMA-I) region. It does, however, substantially improve the fit in the high-Delta m^2 LMA (or LMA-II) region which can be allowed at 98.9% CL. Conversely the analysis allow us to place stringent constraints on the size of the environment dependence terms, which can be translated on a bound on the product of the effective neutrino-scalar (lambda^\nu) and matter-scalar (lambda^N) Yukawa couplings, as a function of the scalar field mass (m_S) in these models.
  • We demonstrate enormous power of dedicated reactor experiment for \theta_{12} with a detector placed at around the first oscillation maximum, which we call "SADO". It allows determination of sin^2\theta_{12} to the accuracy of \simeq 2% at 1 \sigma CL, which surpasses all the method so far proposed. Unlike reactor \theta_{13} experiments, the requirement for the systematic error is very mild, \simeq 4%, which makes it an even more feasible experiment. If we place a detector at \sim 60 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, 0.5 kt yr exposure of SADO is equivalent to \sim 100 kt yr exposure of KamLAND assuming the same systematic error.
  • We discuss reactor measurement of \theta_{12} which has a potential of reaching the ultimate sensitivity which surpasses all the methods so far proposed. The key is to place a detector at an appropriate baseline distance from the reactor neutrino source to have an oscillation maximum at around a peak energy of the event spectrum in the absence of oscillation. By a detailed statistical analysis the optimal distance is estimated to be \simeq (50-70) km x [8 x 10^{-5} eV^2/\Delta m^2_{21}], which is determined by maximizing the oscillation effect in the event number distribution and minimizing geo-neutrino background contamination. To estimate possible uncertainty caused by surrounding nuclear reactors in distance of \sim 100 km, we examine a concrete example of a detector located at Mt. Komagatake, 54 km away from the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant in Japan, the most powerful reactor complex in the world. The effect turns out to be small. Under a reasonable assumption of systematic error of 4% in the experiment, we find that sin^2{\theta_{12}} can be determined to the accuracy of \simeq 2% (\simeq 3%), at 68.27% CL for 1 degree of freedom, for 60 GW_th kton yr (20 GW_th kton yr) operation. We also discuss implications of such an accurate measurement of \theta_{12}.
  • It has been estimated that the entire Earth generates heat corresponding to about 40 TW (equivalent to 10,000 nuclear power plants) which is considered to originate mainly from the radioactive decay of elements like U, Th and K, deposited in the crust and mantle of the Earth. Radioactivity of these elements produce not only heat but also antineutrinos (called geo-antineutrinos) which can be observed by terrestrial detectors. We investigate the possibility of discriminating among Earth composition models predicting different total radiogenic heat generation, by observing such geo-antineutrinos at Kamioka and Gran Sasso, assuming KamLAND and Borexino (type) detectors, respectively, at these places. By simulating the future geo-antineutrino data as well as reactor antineutrino background contributions, we try to establish to which extent we can discriminate among Earth composition models for given exposures (in units of kt$\cdot$ yr) at these two sites on our planet. We use also information on neutrino mixing parameters coming from solar neutrino data as well as KamLAND reactor antineutrino data, in order to estimate the number of geo-antineutrino induced events.
  • We show in this paper that the observation of the angular distribution of upward-going muons and cascade events induced by atmospheric neutrinos at the TeV energy scale, which can be performed by a kilometer-scale neutrino telescope, such as the IceCube detector, can be used to probe a large neutrino mass splitting, $| \Delta m^2 | \sim (0.5-2.0)$ eV$^2$, implied by the LSND experiment and discriminate among four neutrino mass schemes. This is due to the fact that such a large mass scale can promote non negligible muon neutrino to electron/tau neutrino (and/or anti-muon neutrino to anti-electron/anti-tau neutrino) conversions at these energies by the MSW effect as well as vacuum oscillation, unlike what is expected if all the neutrino mass splittings are small.
  • The neutrino oscillation experiment KamLAND has given the first evidence for disappearance of $\bar \nu_e$ coming from nuclear reactors. We have combined their data with all the solar neutrino data assuming two flavor neutrino mixing and obtained allowed parameter regions which are compatible with the so-called large mixing angle MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem. The allowed regions in the plane of mixing angle and mass squared difference are now split into two islands at 99% C.L. We have speculated how these two islands can be separated in the near future. We have shown that a 50% reduction of the error on SNO neutral-current measurement can be important in establishing in each of these islands the true values of these parameters lie. We also have simulated KamLAND positron energy spectrum after 1 year of data taking, assuming the current best fitted values of the oscillation parameters, combined it the with current solar neutrino data and showed how these two split islands can be modified.
  • Assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, in a three generation framework, current and future neutrino oscillation experiments can determine six out of the nine parameters which fully describe the structure of the neutrino mass matrix. We try to clarify the interplay among the remaining parameters, the absolute neutrino mass scale and two CP violating Majorana phases, and how they can be accessed by future neutrinoless double beta ($0\nu\beta\beta$) decay experiments, for the normal as well as for the inverted order of the neutrino mass spectrum. Assuming the oscillation parameters to be in the range presently allowed by atmospheric, solar, reactor and accelerator neutrino experiments, we quantitatively estimate the bounds on $m_0$, the lightest neutrino mass, that can be infered if the next generation $0\nu\beta\beta$ decay experiments can probe the effective Majorana mass ($m_{ee}$) down to $\sim$ 1 meV. In this context we conclude that in the case neutrinos are Majorana particles: (a) if $m_0 \gsim 300$ meV, {\em i.e.}, within the range directly attainable by future laboratory experiments as well as astrophysical observations, then $m_{ee} \gsim 30$ meV must be observed; (b) if $m_0 < 300$ meV, results from future $0\nu\beta\beta$ decay experiments combined with stringent bounds on the neutrino oscillation parameters, specially the solar ones, will place much stronger limits on the allowed values of $m_0$ than these direct experiments.
  • We investigate the potential of a future kilometer-scale neutrino telescope such as the proposed IceCube detector in the South Pole, to measure and disentangle the yet unknown components of the cosmic neutrino flux, the prompt atmospheric neutrinos coming from the decay of charmed particles and the extra-galactic neutrinos, in the 10 TeV to 1 EeV energy range. Assuming a power law type spectra, $d\phi_\nu/dE_\nu \sim \alpha E_\nu^\beta$, we quantify the discriminating power of the IceCube detector and discuss how well we can determine magnitude ($\alpha$) as well as slope ($\beta$) of these two components of the high energy neutrino spectrum, taking into account the background coming from the conventional atmospheric neutrinos.