• The all-sky Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) survey provides uniform and precise ages and other parameters for a variety of clusters in the Solar Neighbourhood. We construct the cluster age distribution, investigate its spatial variations, and discuss constraints on cluster formation scenarios of the Galactic disk during the last 5 Gyrs. Due to the spatial extent of the MWSC, we consider spatial variations of the age distribution along galactocentric radius $R_G$, and along $Z$-axis. For the analysis of the age distribution we use 2242 clusters, which all lie within roughly 2.5 kpc of the Sun. To connect the observed age distribution to the cluster formation history we build an analytical model based on simple assumptions on the cluster initial mass function and on the cluster mass-lifetime relation, fit it to the observations, and determine the parameters of the cluster formation law. Comparison with the literature shows that earlier results strongly underestimated the number of evolved clusters with ages $t\gtrsim 100$ Myr. Recent studies based on all-sky catalogues agree better with our data, but still lack the oldest clusters with ages $t\gtrsim 1$ Gyr. We do not observe a strong variation in the age distribution along $R_G$, though we find an enhanced fraction of older clusters ($t>1$ Gyr) in the inner disk. In contrast, the distribution strongly varies along $Z$. The high altitude distribution practically does not contain clusters with $t<1$ Gyr. With simple assumptions on the cluster formation history, cluster initial mass function and cluster lifetime we can reproduce the observations. Cluster formation rate and cluster lifetime are strongly degenerate, which does not allow us to disentangle different formation scenarios. In all cases the cluster formation rate is strongly declining with time, and the cluster initial mass function is very shallow at the high mass end. (abridged)
  • The magnetic field of CPD -57 3509 was recently detected in the framework of the BOB (B fields in OB stars) collaboration. We acquired low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of CPD -57 3509 with FORS2 and high-resolution UVES observations randomly distributed over a few months to search for periodicity, to study the magnetic field geometry, and to determine the surface distribution of silicon and helium. We also obtained supplementary photometric observations at a timeline similar to the spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric observations. A period of 6.36d was detected in the measurements of the mean longitudinal magnetic field. A sinusoidal fit to our measurements allowed us to constrain the magnetic field geometry and estimate the dipole strength in the range of 3.9-4.5kG. Our application of the Doppler imaging technique revealed the presence of He I spots located around the magnetic poles, with a strong concentration at the positive pole and a weaker one around the negative pole. In contrast, high concentration Si III spots are located close to the magnetic equator. Further, our analysis of the spectral variability of CPD -57 3509 on short time scales indicates distinct changes in shape and position of line profiles possibly caused by the presence of beta Cep-like pulsations. A small periodic variability in line with the changes of the magnetic field strength is clearly seen in the photometric data.
  • Although pulsations of $\delta$ Scuti type are not expected among Ap stars from a theoretical point of view, previous observations of the known $\delta$ Scuti star HD21190 indicated a spectral classification F2 III SrEuSi:, making it the most evolved Ap star known. Our atmospheric chemical analysis based on recent HARPS observations confirms the presence of chemical peculiarities in HD21190. This star is also the only target known to host a magnetic field along with its $\delta$ Scuti pulsation properties. Using an astrometric analysis, we show that HD21190 forms a physical binary system with the companion CPD -83$^{\circ}$ 64B. The presented astrometric and spectroscopic study of the binary components is important to understand the complex interplay between stellar pulsations, magnetic fields, and chemical composition.
  • The census of solar neighbours is still complemented by new discoveries, mainly of very low-mass, faint dwarfs, close to or within the substellar domain. These discoveries contribute to a better understanding of the field population; its origin in terms of Galactic dynamics and (sub)stellar formation and evolution. Also, the nearest stars and brown dwarfs at any given age allow the most precise direct characterization, including the search for planetary companions. We aim to further assess the substellar census on the Galactic plane. We projected the 136 stars and 26 brown dwarfs known at <6.5 pc on the Galactic plane and evaluated their distributions. Stars present a uniform- and brown dwarfs a non-uniform distribution, with 21 objects behind the Sun and only five ahead relative to the direction of rotation of the Galaxy. This substellar configuration has a probability of 0.098$^{+10.878}_{-0.098}$% relative to uniformity. The helio- and geocentric nature of the distribution suggests it might result in part from an observational bias, which if compensated for by future discoveries, might increase the brown-dwarf-to-star ratio, shifting it closer to values found in some star forming regions.
  • AIMS: In their 1st extension to the Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) survey, Schmeja et al. applied photometric filters to the 2MASS to find new cluster candidates that were subsequently confirmed or rejected by the MWSC pipeline. To further extend the MWSC census, we aimed at discovering new clusters by conducting an almost global search in proper motion catalogues as a starting point. METHODS: We first selected high-quality samples from the PPMXL and UCAC4 for comparison and verification of the proper motions. For 441 circular proper motion bins (radius 15 mas/yr) within $\pm$50 mas/yr, the sky outside a thin Galactic plane zone ($|b|$$<$5$^{\circ}$) was binned in small areas ('sky pixels') of 0.25$\times$0.25 deg$^2$. Sky pixels with enhanced numbers of stars with a certain common proper motion in both catalogues were considered as cluster candidates. After visual inspection of the sky images, we built an automated procedure that combined these representations of the sky for neighbouring proper motion subsamples after a background correction. RESULTS: About half of our 692 candidates overlapped with known clusters (46 globular and 68 open clusters in the Galaxy, about 150 known clusters of galaxies) or the Magellanic Clouds. About 10% of our candidates turned out to be 63 new open clusters confirmed by the MWSC pipeline. They occupy predominantly the two inner Galactic quadrants and have apparent sizes and numbers of high-probable members slightly larger than those of the typically small MWSC clusters, whereas their other parameters (ages, distances, tidal radii) fall in the typical ranges. As our search aimed at finding compact clusters, we did not find new very nearby (extended) clusters. (abridged)
  • We present the identification of potential members of nearby Galactic globular clusters using radial velocities from the RAdial Velocity Experiment Data Release 4 (RAVE-DR4) survey database. Our identifications are based on three globular clusters -- NGC 3201, NGC 5139 ($\omega$ Cen) and NGC 362 -- all of which are shown to have |RV|>100 km/s. The identification of globular cluster stars in RAVE DR4 data offers a unique opportunity to test the precision and accuracy of the stellar parameters determined with the currently available Stellar Parameter Pipelines (SPPs) used in the survey, as globular clusters are ideal testbeds for the validation of stellar atmospheric parameters, abundances, distances and ages. For both NGC 3201 and $\omega$ Cen, there is compelling evidence for numerous members (> 10) in the RAVE database; in the case of NGC 362 the evidence is more ambiguous, and there may be significant foreground and/or background contamination in our kinematically-selected sample. A comparison of the RAVE-derived stellar parameters and abundances with published values for each cluster and with BASTI isochrones for ages and metallicities from the literature reveals overall good agreement, with the exception of the apparent underestimation of surface gravities for giants, in particular for the most metal-poor stars. Moreover, if the selected members are part of the main body of each cluster our results would also suggest that the distances from Binney et al. 2013, where only isochrones more metal-rich than -0.9 dex were used, are typically underestimated by ~ 40% with respect to the published distances for the clusters, while the distances from Zwitter et al. 2010 show stars ranging from 1 to ~ 6.5 kpc -- with indications of a trend toward higher distances at lower metallicities -- for the three clusters analysed in this study.
  • AIMS: We selected the bluest object, WISE~J0725$-$2351, from Luhman's new high proper motion (HPM) survey based on observations with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) for spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our aim was to unravel the nature of this relatively bright ($V$$\sim$12, $J$$\sim$11) HPM star ($\mu$$=$267\,mas/yr). METHODS: We obtained low- and medium-resolution spectra with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) New Technology Telescope (NTT)/EFOSC2 and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/XSHOOTER instruments, investigated the radial velocity and performed a quantitative spectral analysis that allowed us to determine physical parameters. The fit of the spectral energy distribution based on the available photometry to low-metallicity model spectra and the similarity of our target to a metal-poor benchmark star (HD~84937) allowed us to estimate the distance and space velocity. RESULTS: As in the case of HD~84937, we classified WISE~J0725$-$2351 as sdF5: or a metal-poor turnoff star with $[Fe/H]$$=$$-$2.0$\pm$0.2, $T_{eff}$$=$6250$\pm$100\,K, $\log{g}$$=$4.0$\pm$0.2, and a possible age of about 12\,Gyr. At an estimated distance of more than 400\,pc, its proper motion translates to a tangential velocity of more than 500\,km/s. Together with its constant (on timescales of hours, days, and months) and large radial velocity (about $+$240\,km/s), the resulting Galactic restframe velocity is about 460\,km/s, implying a bound retrograde orbit for this extreme halo object that currently crosses the Galactic plane at high speed.
  • The B fields in OB stars (BOB) survey is an ESO large programme collecting spectropolarimetric observations for a large number of early-type stars in order to study the occurrence rate, properties, and ultimately the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. As of July 2014, a total of 98 objects were observed over 20 nights with FORS2 and HARPSpol. Our preliminary results indicate that the fraction of magnetic OB stars with an organised, detectable field is low. This conclusion, now independently reached by two different surveys, has profound implications for any theoretical model attempting to explain the field formation in these objects. We discuss in this contribution some important issues addressed by our observations (e.g., the lower bound of the field strength) and the discovery of some remarkable objects.
  • An earlier analysis of the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalogue revealed an apparent lack of old (> 1 Gyr) open clusters in the solar neighbourhood (< 1 kpc). To fill this gap we undertook a search for hitherto unknown star clusters, assuming that the missing old clusters reside at high Galactic latitudes |b|> 20{\deg}. We were looking for stellar density enhancements using a star count algorithm on the 2MASS point source catalogue. To increase the contrast between potential clusters and the field, we applied filters in colour-magnitude space according to typical colour-magnitude diagrams of nearby old open clusters. The subsequent comparison with lists of known objects allowed us to select thus far unknown cluster candidates. For verification they were processed with the standard pipeline used within the MWSC survey for computing cluster membership probabilities and for determining structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters. In total we discovered 782 density enhancements, 522 of which were classified as real objects. Among them 139 are new open clusters with ages 8.3 < log (t [yr]) < 9.7, distances d < 3 kpc, and distances from the Galactic plane 0.3 < Z < 1 kpc. This new sample has increased the total number of known high latitude open clusters by about 150%. Nevertheless, we still observe a lack of older nearby clusters up to 1 kpc from the Sun. This volume is expected to still contain about 60 unknown clusters that probably escaped our detection algorithm, which fails to detect sparse overdensities with large angular size.
  • Context. M subdwarfs are metal poor and cool stars. They are important probes of the old galactic populations. However, they remain elusive due to their low luminosity. Observational and modeling efforts are required to fully understand their physics and to investigate the effects of metallicity in their cool atmospheres. Aims. We perform a detailed study of a sample of subdwarfs to determine their stellar parameters and constrain the stat-of-the art atmospheric models. Methods. We present UVES/VLT high resolution spectra of three late-K subdwarfs and 18 M subdwarfs. Our atlas covers the optical region from 6400 AA up to the near infrared at 8900 AA. We show spectral details of cool atmospheres at very high resolution (R= 40 000) and compare with synthetic spectra computed from the recent BT-Settl atmosphere models. Results. Our comparison shows that molecular features (TiO, VO, CaH), and atomic features (Fe I, Ti I, Na I, K I) are well fitted by current models. We produce an effective temperature versus spectral type relation all over the subdwarf spectral sequence. Thanks to the high resolution of our spectra, we perform a detailed comparison of line profiles of individual elements such as Fe I, Ca II, Ti I, and are able to determine accurate metallicities of these stars. These determinations contribute to calibrate the relation between metallicity and molecular band strength indices from low-resolution spectra. Conclusions. This work shows that the new generation of models are able to reproduce various spectral features of M subdwarfs. Working with these high resolution spectra allowed us to disentangle the atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, gravity, metallicity), which is not possible when using low resolution spectroscopy or photometry.
  • We construct new estimates on the Galactic escape speed at various Galactocentric radii using the latest data release of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE DR4). Compared to previous studies we have a database larger by a factor of 10 as well as reliable distance estimates for almost all stars. Our analysis is based on the statistical analysis of a rigorously selected sample of 90 high-velocity halo stars from RAVE and a previously published data set. We calibrate and extensively test our method using a suite of cosmological simulations of the formation of Milky Way-sized galaxies. Our best estimate of the local Galactic escape speed, which we define as the minimum speed required to reach three virial radii $R_{340}$, is $533^{+54}_{-41}$ km/s (90% confidence) with an additional 5% systematic uncertainty, where $R_{340}$ is the Galactocentric radius encompassing a mean over-density of 340 times the critical density for closure in the Universe. From the escape speed we further derive estimates of the mass of the Galaxy using a simple mass model with two options for the mass profile of the dark matter halo: an unaltered and an adiabatically contracted Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) sphere. If we fix the local circular velocity the latter profile yields a significantly higher mass than the un-contracted halo, but if we instead use the statistics on halo concentration parameters in large cosmological simulations as a constraint we find very similar masses for both models. Our best estimate for $M_{340}$, the mass interior to $R_{340}$ (dark matter and baryons), is $1.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3} \times 10^{12}$ M$_\odot$ (corresponding to $M_{200} = 1.6^{+0.5}_{-0.4} \times 10^{12}$ M$_\odot$). This estimate is in good agreement with recently published independent mass estimates based on the kinematics of more distant halo stars and the satellite galaxy Leo I.
  • We use multi-epoch near-infrared observations from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Cloud system (VMC) to measure the proper motion of stars of the LMC, in one tile of 1.5 deg^2 centred at (alpha, delta) = (05:59:23.136, -66:20:28.68) and including the South Ecliptic Pole, with respect to their 2MASS position over a time baseline of ~10 years and from VMC observations only, spanning a time range of ~1 year. Stars of different ages are selected from the (J-Ks) vs. Ks diagram and their average coordinate displacement is computed from the difference between Ks band observations for stars as faint as Ks=19 mag. Proper motions are derived by averaging up to seven 2MASS-VMC combinations in the first case and from the slope of the best fit line among the seven VMC epochs in the second case. Separate proper motion values are obtained for variable stars in the field. The proper motion of ~40,000 LMC stars in the tile, with respect to ~8000 background galaxies, obtained from VMC data alone, is mu_alpha cos(delta) = +2.20+/-0.06 (stat) +/-0.29 (sys) and mu_delta = +1.70+/-0.06 (stat) +/-0.30 (sys) mas/yr. This value agrees with recent ground-based determinations in a nearby field but is larger than studies with the HST; the cause of this discrepancy may be due to additional systematic errors in the data. The LMC proper motion is also clearly distinct from the proper motion derived for stars of the Milky Way. The relative proper motion between the foreground stars and the LMC stars is ~5 mas/yr. Furthermore, we measure a decrease of the proper motion with increasing logarithm of stellar age for LMC stars. This study, based on just one VMC tile, shows the potential of the 2MASS-VMC and VMC-VMC combinations for a comprehensive investigation of the proper motion across the Magellanic system. (Abridged)
  • Context. Galactic open clusters (OCs) mainly belong to the young stellar population in the Milky Way disk, but are there groups and complexes of OCs that possibly define an additional level in hierarchical star formation? Current compilations are too incomplete to address this question, especially regarding radial velocities (RVs) and metallicities ($[M/H]$). Aims. Here we provide and discuss newly obtained RV and $[M/H]$ data, which will enable us to reinvestigate potential groupings of open clusters and associations. Methods.We extracted additional RVs and $[M/H]$ from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) via a cross-match with the Catalogue of Stars in Open Cluster Areas (CSOCA). For the identified OCs in RAVE we derived RV and $[M/H]$ from a cleaned working sample and compared the results with previous findings. Results. Although our RAVE sample does not show the same accuracy as the entire survey, we were able to derive reliable RV for 110 Galactic open clusters. For 37 OCs we publish RV for the first time. Moreover, we determined $[M/H]$ for 81 open clusters, extending the number of OCs with $[M/H]$ by 69.
  • Although they are the main constituents of the Galactic disk population, for half of the open clusters in the Milky Way reported in the literature nothing is known except the raw position and an approximate size. The main goal of this study is to determine a full set of uniform spatial, structural, kinematic, and astrophysical parameters for as many known open clusters as possible. On the basis of stellar data from PPMXL and 2MASS, we used a dedicated data-processing pipeline to determine kinematic and photometric membership probabilities for stars in a cluster region. For an input list of 3784 targets from the literature, we confirm that 3006 are real objects, the vast majority of them are open clusters, but associations and globular clusters are also present. For each confirmed object we determined the exact position of the cluster centre, the apparent size, proper motion, distance, colour excess, and age. For about 1500 clusters, these basic astrophysical parameters have been determined for the first time. For the bulk of the clusters we also derived the tidal radius. We estimated additionally average radial velocities for more than 30% of the confirmed clusters. The present sample (called MWSC) reaches both the central parts of the Milky Way and its outer regions. It is almost complete up to 1.8 kpc from the Sun and also covers neighbouring spiral arms. However, for a small subset of the oldest open clusters ($\log t \gtrsim 9$) we found some evidence of incompleteness within about 1 kpc from the Sun.
  • The aim of the project is to improve our current knowledge of the density of T dwarfs and the shape of the substellar initial mass function by identifying a magnitude-limited sample of T dwarfs in the full southern sky. We present the results of a photometric search aimed at discovering cool brown dwarfs in the Southern sky imaged at infrared wavelengths by the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) and the Wide Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite mission. We combined the first data release (DR1) of the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) and the WISE preliminary data release to extract candidates with red mid-infrared colours and near- to mid-infrared colours characteristics of cool brown dwarfs. The VHS DR1 vs WISE search returned tens of T dwarf candidates, 13 of which are presented here, including two previously published in the literature and five new ones confirmed spectroscopically with spectral types between T4.5 and T8. We estimate that the two T6 dwarfs lie within 16 pc and the T4.5 within 25 pc. The remaining three are 30-50 pc distant. The only T7 dwarf in our sample is the faintest of its spectral class with J=19.28 mag. The other six T dwarf candidates remain without spectroscopic follow-up. We also improve our knowledge on the proper motion accuracy for three bright T dwarfs by combining multi-epoch data from public databases (DENIS, 2MASS, VHS, WISE, Spitzer).
  • Aims: On the basis of the PPMXL star catalogue we performed a survey of star clusters in the second quadrant of the Milky Way. Methods: From the PPMXL catalogue of positions and proper motions we took the subset of stars with near-infrared photometry from 2MASS and added the remaining 2MASS stars without proper motions (called 2MAst, i.e. 2MASS with astrometry). We developed a data-processing pipeline including interactive human control of a standardised set of multi-dimensional diagrams to determine kinematic and photometric membership probabilities for stars in a cluster region. The pipeline simultaneously produced the astrophysical parameters of a cluster. From literature we compiled a target list of presently known open and globular clusters, cluster candidates, associations, and moving groups. From established member stars we derived spatial parameters (coordinates of centres and radii of the main morphological parts of clusters) and cluster kinematics (average proper motions and sometimes radial velocities). For distance, reddening, and age determination we used specific sets of theoretical isochrones. Tidal parameters were obtained by a fit of three-parameter King profiles to the observed density distributions of members. Results: We investigated all 871 objects in the 2nd Galactic quadrant, of which we successfully treated 642 open clusters, 2 globular clusters, and 8 stellar associations. The remaining 219 objects (24%) were recognised by us to be nonexistent clusters, duplicate entries, or clusters too faint for 2MAst. We found that our sample is complete in the 2nd quadrant up to a distance of 2 kpc, where the average surface density is 94 clusters per kpc$^{2}$. Compared with literature values we found good agreement in spatial and kinematic data, as well as for optical distances and reddening. Small, but systematic offsets were detected in the age determination.
  • We exploit the spectral archive of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 to select unusual quasar spectra. The selection method is based on a combination of the power of self-organising maps and the visual inspection of a huge number of spectra. Self-organising maps were applied to nearly 10^5 spectra classified as quasars by the SDSS pipeline. Particular attention was paid to minimise possible contamination by rare peculiar stellar spectral types. We present a catalogue of 1005 quasars with unusual spectra. This large sample provides a useful resource for both studying properties and relations of/between different types of unusual quasars and selecting particularly interesting objects. The spectra are grouped into six types. All these types turn out to be on average more luminous than comparison samples of normal quasars after a statistical correction is made for intrinsic reddening. Both the unusual broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and the strong iron emitters have significantly lower radio luminosities than normal quasars. We also confirm that strong BALs avoid the most radio-luminous quasars. Finally, we create a sample of quasars similar to the two "mysterious" objects discovered by Hall et al. (2002) and briefly discuss the quasar properties and possible explanations of their highly peculiar spectra. (Abstract modified to match the arXiv format)
  • Aims: WISE provides an infrared all-sky survey which aims at completing our knowledge on the possibly dramatically increasing number of brown dwarfs with lower temperatures. We search for the nearest representatives of the coolest brown dwarfs, which will be very interesting for detailed follow-up observations, once they haven been discovered. Methods: We have used the preliminary data release from WISE, selected bright candidates with colours typical of late-T dwarfs, tried to match them with faint 2MASS and SDSS objects, to determine their proper motions, and to follow-up them spectroscopically. Results: We have identified two new ultracool brown dwarfs, WISE J0254+0223 and WISE J1741+2553, with large proper motions of about 2.5 and 1.5 arcsec/yr, respectively. With their w1-w2~3.0 and J-w2~4.0 colour indices we expect both to have a spectral type of ~T8-T10 and absolute magnitude of M_{w2}~14. We confirm WISE J1741+2553 as a T9-T10 dwarf from near-infrared spectroscopy with LBT/LUCIFER1. From their bright WISE w2 magnitudes of 12.7 and 12.3, we estimate distances of 5.5$^{+2.3}_{-1.6}$ pc and 4.6$^{+1.2}_{-1.0}$ pc and tangential velocities of ~65 km/s and ~34 km/s indicating Galactic thick and thin disk membership, respectively.
  • On the basis of the PPMXL catalogue we perform an all-sky census of the Hyades down to masses of about 0.2 m_sun in a region up to 30 pc from the cluster centre. We use the proper motions from PPMXL in the convergent point method to determine probable kinematic members. From 2MASS photometry and CMC14 r'-band photometry, we derive empirical colour-absolute magnitude diagrams and, finally, determine photometric membership for all kinematic candidates. This is the first deep (r' < 17) all-sky survey of the Hyades allowing a full three-dimensional analysis of the cluster. The survey is complete down to at least M_{K_s} = 7.3 or 0.25 m_sun. We find 724 stellar systems co-moving with the bulk Hyades space velocity, which represent a total mass of 435 m_sun. The tidal radius is about 9 pc, and 275 m_sun (364 systems) are gravitationally bound. This is the cluster proper. Its mass density profile is perfectly fitted by a Plummer model with a central density of 2.21 m_sun*pc^-3 and a core radius of r_co = 3.10 pc, while the half-mass radius is r_h = 4.1 pc. There are another 100 m_sun in a volume between one and two tidal radii (halo), and another 60 m_sun up to a distance of 30 pc from the centre. Strong mass segregation is inherent in the cluster. The present-day luminosity and mass functions are noticeably different in various parts of the cluster (core, corona, halo, and co-movers). They are strongly evolved compared to presently favoured initial mass functions. The analysis of the velocity dispersion of the cluster shows that about 20% of its members must be binaries. As a by-product, we find that presently available theoretical isochrones are not able to adequately describe the near-infrared colour-absolute magnitude relation for those cluster stars that are less massive than about 0.6 m_sun.
  • High-velocity stars in the Galactic halo, e.g. the so-called hyper-velocity stars (HVS), are important tracers of the properties of the dark matter halo, in particular its mass. Based on the SDSS DR6 spectral database a search for the fastest stars among hot subdwarfs (sdB) in the halo is carried out to identify HVS, unbound to the Galaxy, and bound population II stars in order to derive a lower limit to the halo mass. The radial velocity measurements were verified at several telescopes to exclude radial velocity variable stars. Out of 88 stars observed in the follow-up campaign 39 stars were found to have constant radial velocities. For twelve of them we measured a proper motion significantly different from zero and obtained spectroscopic distances from quantitative spectral analysis to construct the full 6D phase space information for a kinematical study. The programme sdBs can be distinguished into two kinematical groups, one (G1) with low Galactic rotation typical of halo stars and a second one (G2) with rapid retrograde motion. The G1 objects crossed the Galactic plane in the central bulge, whereas the G2 stars did in the outer Galactic disc. J1211+1437 (G2) is a HVS candidate, as it is unbound to the Galaxy if the standard Galactic potential is adopted. We conclude that in the ejection scenario G1 stars might have been formed via the slingshot mechanism that invokes acceleration by tidal interaction of a binary with the central supermassive black hole. The G2 stars, however, would originate in the outskirts of the Galactic disc and not in the central bulge. J1211+1437 is the first unbound subdwarf B star, for which we can rule out the slingshot mechanism. Alternatively, we may assume that the stars are old population II stars and therefore have to be bound. Then the kinematics of J1211+1437 set a lower limit of 2 x 10^12 Msun to the mass of the Galactic dark matter halo.
  • (abridged) We found in previous studies that standard Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models are unable to describe or explain the colours of Galactic open clusters both in the visible and in the NIR spectral range. (...) We construct a numerical SSP-model, with an underlying Salpeter IMF, valid within an upper $m_u$ and lower $m_l$ stellar mass range, and with total masses $M_c=10^2...10^4\,m_\odot$ typical of open clusters. We assume that the mass loss from a cluster is provided by mass loss from evolved stars and by the dynamical evaporation of low-mass members due to two-body relaxation. The data for the latter process were scaled to the models from high-resolution N-body calculations. We also investigate how a change of the $m_l$-limit influences magnitudes and colours of clusters of a given mass and derive a necessary condition for a luminosity and colour flash. The discreteness of the IMF leads to bursts in magnitude and colour of model clusters at moments when red supergiants or giants appear and then die. The amplitude of the burst depends on the cluster mass and on the spectral range; it is strongly increased in the NIR compared to optical passbands. In the discrete case, variations of the parameter $m_l$ are able to substantially change the magnitude-age and $M/L$-age relations. For the colours, the lowering of $m_l$ considerably amplifies the discreteness effect. The influence of dynamical mass loss on colour and magnitude is weak, although it provides a change of the slopes of the considered relations, improving their agreement with observations. For the Galactic open clusters we determined luminosity and tidal mass independent of each other. The derived mass-to-luminosity ratio shows, on average, an increase with cluster age in the optical, but gradually declines with age in the NIR. The observed flash statistics can be used to constrain $m_l$ in open clusters.
  • Blue straggler, which are stars that appear to be younger than they should be, are an important population of unusual stars in both stellar clusters and the halo field of the Galaxy. Most formation scenarios evoke either stellar collisions or binary stars that transfer mass or merge. We investigate high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo and perform a spectral and kinematical analysis to shed light on their nature and origin. Here we report that SDSSJ130005.62+042201.6 (J1300+0422 for short) is an A-type star of unusually large radial velocity (504.6 $\pm$ 5 \kms). From a quantitative NLTE (and LTE) spectral analysis of medium-resolution optical spectra, the elemental composition is derived. Proper motion measurements combined with a spectroscopic distance estimate allow us to determine its present space velocity. Its kinematical properties are derived by integrating the equation of motion in the Galactic potential. We find J1300+0422 to be metal poor ([M/H]=$-1.2$) and exhibit an $\alpha$-element enrichment ($0.3-0.4$~dex) that is characteristic of the halo population, as confirmed by a kinematical analysis of its 3D space motions, which places it on a highly eccentric retrograde Galactic orbit. The mass of J1300+0422 (1.15 $\pm$ 0.10 M$_\odot$) is higher than the globular cluster turn-off masses indicating that it is a halo blue straggler star. At a Galactic rest-frame velocity of $\approx$467~\kms, the star travels faster than any known blue straggler but is still bound to the Galaxy.
  • Aims: Completing the poorly known substellar census of the solar neighbourhood, especially with respect to the coolest brown dwarfs, will lead to a better understanding of failed star formation processes and binary statistics with different environmental conditions. Methods: Using UKIDSS data and their cross-correlation with the SDSS, we searched for high proper motion mid- to late-T dwarf candidates with extremely blue near-infrared (J-K<0) and very red optical-to-near-infrared (z-J>+2.5) colours. Results: With 11 newly found T dwarf candidates, the proper motions of which range between 100 and 800 mas/yr, we increased the number of UKIDSS T dwarf discoveries by $\approx$30%. Large proper motions were also measured for six of eight previously known T4.5-T9 dwarfs detected in our survey. All new candidates can be classified as T5-T9 dwarfs based on their colours. Two of these objects were found to be common proper motion companions of Hipparcos stars with accurate parallaxes. The latter allow us to determine absolute magnitudes from which we classify Hip 63510C as T7 and Hip 73786B as T6.5 dwarfs with an uncertainty of $\pm$1 spectral subtype. The projected physical separation from their low-mass (M0.5 and K5) primaries is in both cases about 1200 AU. One of the Hipparcos stars has already a known very low-mass star or brown dwarf companion on a close astrometric orbit (Hip 63510B = Gl 494B). With distances of only 11.7 and 18.6 pc, deduced from their primaries respectively for Hip 63510C and Hip 73786B, various follow-up observations can easily be carried out to study these cool brown dwarfs in more detail and to compare their properties with those of the already well-investigated primaries.
  • New near-infrared large-area sky surveys (e.g. UKIDSS, CFBDS, WISE) go deeper than 2MASS and aim at detecting brown dwarfs lurking in the Solar neighbourhood which are even fainter than the latest known T-type objects, so-called Y dwarfs. Using UKIDSS data, we have found a faint brown dwarf candidate with very red optical-to-near-infrared but extremely blue near-infrared colours next to the recently discovered nearby L dwarf SDSS J141624.08$ + $134826.7. We check if the two objects are co-moving by studying their parallactic and proper motion and compare the new object with known T dwarfs. The astrometric measurements are consistent with a physical pair ($sep$$\approx$75 AU) at a distance $d$$\approx$8 pc. The extreme colour ($J$$-$$K$$\approx$$-$1.7) and absolute magnitude ($M_J$=17.78$\pm$0.46 and $M_K$=19.45$\pm$0.52) make the new object appear as one of the coolest (T$_{eff}$$\approx$600 K) and nearest brown dwarfs, probably of late-T spectral type and possibly with a high surface gravity (log $g$$\approx$5.0).
  • Hyper-velocity stars (HVS) are moving so fast that they are unbound to the Galaxy. Dynamical ejection by a supermassive black hole is favoured to explain their origin. Locating the place of birth of an individual HVS is of utmost importance to understanding the ejection mechanism. SDSS J013655.91+242546.0 (J0136+2425 for short) was found amongst three high-velocity stars (drawn from a sample of more than 10000 blue stars), for which proper motions were measured. A kinematical as well as a quantitative NLTE spectral analysis was performed. When combined with the radial velocity (RV) and the spectroscopic distance, the trajectory of the star in the Galactic potential was reconstructed. J0136+2425 is found to be an A-type main-sequence star travelling at $\approx$590 \kms, possibly unbound to the Galaxy and originating in the outer Galactic rim nowhere near the Galactic centre. J0136+2425 is the second HVS candidate with measured proper motion, besides the massive B star HD 271791, and also the second for which its proper motion excludes a Galactic centre origin and, hence, the SMBH slingshot mechanism. Most known HVS are late B-type stars of about 3 M$_\odot$. With a mass of 2.45 M$_\odot$, J0136+2425 resembles a typical HVS far more than HD 271791 does. Hence, this is the first time that a typical HVS is found not to originate in the Galactic centre. Its ejection velocity from the disk is so high (550 \kms) that the extreme supernova binary scenario proposed for HD 271791 is very unlikely.