• The great success of Helioseismology resides in the remarkable progress achieved in the understanding of the structure and dynamics of the solar interior. This success mainly relies on the ability to conceive, implement, and operate specific instrumentation with enough sensitivity to detect and measure small fluctuations (in velocity and/or intensity) on the solar surface that are well below one meter per second or a few parts per million. Furthermore the limitation of the ground observations imposing the day-night cycle (thus a periodic discontinuity in the observations) was overcome with the deployment of ground-based networks --properly placed at different longitudes all over the Earth-- allowing longer and continuous observations of the Sun and consequently increasing their duty cycles. In this chapter, we start by a short historical overview of helioseismology. Then we describe the different techniques used to do helioseismic analyses along with a description of the main instrumental concepts. We in particular focus on the instruments that have been operating long enough to study the solar magnetic activity. Finally, we give a highlight of the main results obtained with such high-duty cycle observations (>80%) lasting over the last few decades.
  • The variations of the frequencies of the low-degree acoustic oscillations in the Sun induced by magnetic activity show a dependence with radial order. The frequency shifts are observed to increase towards higher-order modes to reach a maximum of about 0.8 muHz over the 11-yr solar cycle. A comparable frequency dependence is also measured in two other main-sequence solar-like stars, the F-star HD49933, and the young 1-Gyr-old solar analog KIC10644253, although with different amplitudes of the shifts of about 2 muHz and 0.5 muHz respectively. Our objective here is to extend this analysis to stars with different masses, metallicities, and evolutionary stages. From an initial set of 87 Kepler solar-like oscillating stars with already known individual p-mode frequencies, we identify five stars showing frequency shifts that can be considered reliable using selection criteria based on Monte Carlo simulations and on the photospheric magnetic activity proxy Sph. The frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of four of these stars could be measured for the l=0 and l=1 modes individually. Given the quality of the data, the results could indicate that a different physical source of perturbation than in the Sun is dominating in this sample of solar-like stars.
  • We study the variability of solar activity using new photospheric proxies originally developed for the analysis of stellar magnetism with the CoRoT and Kepler photometric observations. These proxies are obtained by tracking the temporal modulations in the observations associated to the spots and magnetic features as the Sun rotates. We analyze here 21 years, spanning solar cycles 23 and 24, of the observations collected by the space-based photometric VIRGO and radial velocity GOLF instruments on board the SoHO satellite. The photospheric activity proxy Sph is then calculated for each of the three VIRGO photometers as well as the associated Svel proxy from the radial velocity GOLF observations. Comparisons with several standard solar activity proxies sensitive to different layers of the Sun demonstrate that these new activity proxies, Sph and Svel, provide a new manner to monitor solar activity. We show that both the long- and short-term magnetic variabilities respectively associated to the 11-year cycle and the quasi-biennial oscillation are well monitored, and that the magnetic field interaction between the subsurface, the photosphere, and the chromosphere of the Sun, was modified between Cycle 24 and Cycle 23. Furthermore, the photometric proxies show a wavelength dependence of the response function of the solar photosphere among the three channels of the VIRGO photometers, providing inputs for the study of the stellar magnetism of Sun-like stars.
  • Calibration issues associated to scrambled collateral smear affecting the Kepler short-cadence data were discovered in the Data Release 24 and were found to be present in all the previous data releases since launch. In consequence, a new Data Release 25 was reprocessed to correct for these problems. We perform here a preliminary study to evaluate the impact on the extracted global seismic and background parameters between data releases. We analyze the sample of seismic solar analogs observed by Kepler in short cadence between Q5 and Q17. We start with this set of stars as it constitutes the best sample to put the Sun into context along its evolution, and any significant differences on the seismic and background parameters need to be investigated before any further studies of this sample can take place. We use the A2Z pipeline to derive both global seismic parameters and background parameters from the Data Release 25 and previous data releases and report on the measured differences.
  • We identify a set of 18 solar analogs among the seismic sample of solar-like stars observed by the Kepler satellite rotating between 10 and 40 days. This set is constructed using the asteroseismic stellar properties derived using either the global oscillation properties or the individual acoustic frequencies. We measure the magnetic activity properties of these stars using observations collected by the photometric Kepler satellite and by the ground-based, high-resolution Hermes spectrograph mounted on the Mercator telescope. The photospheric (Sph) and chromospheric (S index) magnetic activity levels of these seismic solar analogs are estimated and compared in relation to the solar activity. We show that the activity of the Sun is comparable to the activity of the seismic solar analogs, within the maximum-to-minimum temporal variations of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. In agreement with previous studies, the youngest stars and fastest rotators in our sample are actually the most active. The activity of stars older than the Sun seems to not evolve much with age. Furthermore, the comparison of the photospheric, Sph, with the well-established chromospheric, S index, indicates that the Sph index can be used to provide a suitable magnetic activity proxy which can be easily estimated for a large number of stars from space photometric observations.
  • The continuous photometric observations collected by the Kepler satellite over 4 years provide a whelm of data with an unequalled quantity and quality for the study of stellar evolution of more than 200000 stars. Moreover, the length of the dataset provide a unique source of information to detect magnetic activity and associated temporal variability in the acoustic oscillations. In this regards, the Kepler mission was awaited with great expectation. The search for the signature of magnetic activity variability in solar-like pulsations still remained unfruitful more than 2 years after the end of the nominal mission. Here, however, we report the discovery of temporal variability in the low-degree acoustic frequencies of the young (1 Gyr-old) solar analog KIC 10644253 with a modulation of about 1.5 years with significant temporal variations along the duration of the Kepler observations. The variations are in agreement with the derived photometric activity. The frequency shifts extracted for KIC 10644253 are shown to result from the same physical mechanisms involved in the inner sub-surface layers as in the Sun. In parallel, a detailed spectroscopic analysis of KIC 10644253 is performed based on complementary ground-based, high-resolution observations collected by the HERMES instrument mounted on the MERCATOR telescope. Its lithium abundance and chromospheric activity S-index confirm that KIC 10644253 is a young and more active star than the Sun.
  • Dipole mixed pulsation modes of consecutive radial order have been detected for thousands of low-mass red-giant stars with the NASA space telescope Kepler. Such modes have the potential to reveal information on the physics of the deep stellar interior. Different methods have been proposed to derive an observed value for the gravity-mode period spacing, the most prominent one relying on a relation derived from asymptotic pulsation theory applied to the gravity-mode character of the mixed modes. Our aim is to compare results based on this asymptotic relation with those derived from an empirical approach for three pulsating red-giant stars. We developed a data-driven method to perform frequency extraction and mode identification. Next, we used the identified dipole mixed modes to determine the gravity-mode period spacing by means of an empirical method and by means of the asymptotic relation. In our methodology, we consider the phase offset, $\epsilon_{\mathrm{g}}$, of the asymptotic relation as a free parameter. Using the frequencies of the identified dipole mixed modes for each star in the sample, we derived a value for the gravity-mode period spacing using the two different methods. These differ by less than 5%. The average precision we achieved for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation is better than 1%, while that of our data-driven approach is 3%. Good agreement is found between values for the period spacing derived from the asymptotic relation and from the empirical method. Full abstract in PDF file.
  • One of the most difficult properties to derive for stars is their age. For cool main-sequence stars, gyrochronology relations can be used to infer stellar ages from measured rotation pe- riods and HR Diagram positions. These relations have few calibrators with known ages for old, long rotation period stars. There is a significant sample of old Kepler objects of inter- est, or KOIs, which have both measurable surface rotation periods and precise asteroseismic measurements from which ages can be accurately derived. In this work we determine the age and the rotation period of solar-like pulsating KOIs to both compare the rotation properties of stars with and without known planets and enlarge the gyrochronology calibration sample for old stars. We use Kepler photometric light curves to derive the stellar surface rotation peri- ods while ages are obtained with asteroseismology using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal in which individual mode frequencies are combined with high-resolution spectroscopic pa- rameters. We thus determine surface rotation periods and ages for 11 planet-hosting stars, all over 2 Gyr old. We find that the planet-hosting stars exhibit a rotational behaviour that is consistent with the latest age-rotation models and similar to the rotational behaviour of stars without detected planets. We conclude that these old KOIs can be used to test and calibrate gyrochronology along with stars not known to host planets.
  • The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of {individual} gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in different planes in the sphere, depending on their azimuthal wave number. We are able to isolate individual IGWs from a complex spectrum and to study their propagation in space and time. In particular, we highlight in this paper the necessity of studying the propagation of waves in 3D spherical geometry, since the distribution of their energy is not equipartitioned in the sphere.
  • The rotation rates in the deep interior and at the surface of 22 main-sequence stars with masses between $1.0$ and $1.6\,{\rm M}_{\odot}$ are constrained by combining asteroseismological analysis with spectroscopic measurements. The asteroseismic data of each star are taken by the {\it Kepler} or CoRoT space mission. It is found that the difference between the surface rotation rate and the average rotation rate (excluding the convective core) of most of stars is small enough to suggest that an efficient process of angular momentum transport operates during and/or before the main-sequence stage of stars. If each of the surface convective zone and the underlying radiative zone, for individual stars, is assumed to rotate uniformly, the difference in the rotation rate between the two zones turns out to be no more than a factor of two in most of the stars independently of their ages.
  • The detection of mixed modes that are split by rotation in Kepler red giants has made it possible to probe the internal rotation profiles of these stars, which brings new constraints on the transport of angular momentum in stars. Mosser et al. (2012) have measured the rotation rates in the central regions of intermediate-mass core helium burning stars (secondary clump stars). Our aim was to exploit& the rotational splittings of mixed modes to estimate the amount of radial differential rotation in the interior of secondary clump stars using Kepler data, in order to place constraints on angular momentum transport in intermediate-mass stars. We selected a subsample of Kepler secondary clump stars with mixed modes that are clearly rotationally split. By applying a thorough statistical analysis, we showed that the splittings of both gravity-dominated modes (trapped in central regions) and p-dominated modes (trapped in the envelope) can be measured. We then used these splittings to estimate the amount of differential rotation by using inversion techniques and by applying a simplified approach based on asymptotic theory (Goupil et al. 2013). We obtained evidence for a weak radial differential rotation for six of the seven targets that were selected, with the central regions rotating $1.8\pm0.3$ to $3.2\pm1.0$ times faster than the envelope. The last target was found to be consistent with a solid-body rotation. This demonstrates that an efficient redistribution of angular momentum occurs after the end of the main sequence in the interior of intermediate-mass stars, either during the short-lived subgiant phase, or once He-burning has started in the core. In either case, this should bring constraints on the angular momentum transport mechanisms that are at work.
  • Kepler ultra-high precision photometry of long and continuous observations provides a unique dataset in which surface rotation and variability can be studied for thousands of stars. Because many of these old field stars also have independently measured asteroseismic ages, measurements of rotation and activity are particularly interesting in the context of age-rotation-activity relations. In particular, age-rotation relations generally lack good calibrators at old ages, a problem that this Kepler sample of old-field stars is uniquely suited to address. We study the surface rotation and photometric magnetic activity of a subset of 540 solar-like stars on the main- sequence and the subgiant branch for which stellar pulsations have been measured. The rotation period was determined by comparing the results from two different analysis methods: i) the projection onto the frequency domain of the time-period analysis, and ii) the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the light curves. Reliable surface rotation rates were then extracted by comparing the results from two different sets of calibrated data and from the two complementary analyses. We report rotation periods for 310 out of 540 targets (excluding known binaries and candidate planet-host stars); our measurements span a range of 1 to 100 days. The photometric magnetic activity levels of these stars were computed, and for 61.5% of the dwarfs, this level is similar to the range, from minimum to maximum, of the solar magnetic activity. We demonstrate that hot dwarfs, cool dwarfs, and subgiants have very different rotation-age relationships, highlighting the importance of separating out distinct populations when interpreting stellar rotation periods. Our sample of cool dwarf stars with age and metallicity data of the highest quality is consistent with gyrochronology relations reported in the literature.
  • We use various method to extract surface rotation periods of Kepler targets exhibiting solar-like oscillations and compare their results.
  • The Sun-as-a-star helioseismic spectrophotometer GOLF and photometer VIRGO instruments onboard the SoHO spacecraft are collecting high-quality, continuous data since April 1996. We analyze here these unique datasets in order to investigate the peculiar and weak on-going solar cycle 24. As this cycle 24 is reaching its maximum, we compare its rising phase with the rising phase of the previous solar cycle 23.
  • In this work, we use different methods to extract the surface rotation rate of Kepler targets showing solar-like oscillations.
  • Recently the number of main-sequence and subgiant stars exhibiting solar-like oscillations that are resolved into individual mode frequencies has increased dramatically. While only a few such data sets were available for detailed modeling just a decade ago, the Kepler mission has produced suitable observations for hundreds of new targets. This rapid expansion in observational capacity has been accompanied by a shift in analysis and modeling strategies to yield uniform sets of derived stellar properties more quickly and easily. We use previously published asteroseismic and spectroscopic data sets to provide a uniform analysis of 42 solar-type Kepler targets from the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP). We find that fitting the individual frequencies typically doubles the precision of the asteroseismic radius, mass and age compared to grid-based modeling of the global oscillation properties, and improves the precision of the radius and mass by about a factor of three over empirical scaling relations. We demonstrate the utility of the derived properties with several applications.
  • The Kepler mission has collected light curves for almost 4 years. The excellent quality of these data has allowed us to probe the structure and the dynamics of the stars using asteroseismology. With the length of data available, we can start to look for magnetic activity cycles. The Kepler data obtained for the F star, KIC 12009504, shows a rotation period of 9.5 days and additional variability that could be due to the magnetic activity of the star. Here we present recent and preliminary 3D global-scale dynamo simulations of this star with the ASH and STELEM codes, capturing a substantial portion of the convection and the stable radiation zone below it. These simulations reveal a multi-year activity cycle whose length tentatively depends upon the width of the tachocline present in the simulation. Furthermore, the presence of a magnetic field and the dynamo action taking place in the convection zone appears to help confine the tachocline, but longer simulations will be required to confirm this.
  • The NASA Kepler mission has observed more than 190,000 stars in the constellations of Cygnus and Lyra. Around 4 years of almost continuous ultra high-precision photometry have been obtained reaching a duty cycle higher than 90% for many of these stars. However, almost regular gaps due to nominal operations are present in the light curves at different time scales. In this paper we want to highlight the impact of those regular gaps in asteroseismic analyses and we try to find a method that minimizes their effect in the frequency domain. To do so, we isolate the two main time scales of quasi regular gaps in the data. We then interpolate the gaps and we compare the power density spectra of four different stars: two red giants at different stages of their evolution, a young F-type star, and a classical pulsator in the instability strip. The spectra obtained after filling the gaps in the selected solar-like stars show a net reduction in the overall background level, as well as a change in the background parameters. The inferred convective properties could change as much as 200% in the selected example, introducing a bias in the p-mode frequency of maximum power. When global asteroseismic scaling relations are used, this bias can lead up to a variation in the surface gravity of 0.05 dex. Finally, the oscillation spectrum in the classical pulsator is cleaner compared to the original one.
  • The study of stellar activity is important because it can provide new constraints for dynamo models, when combined with surface rotation rates and the depth of the convection zone. We know that the dynamo mechanism, which is believed to be the main process to rule the magnetic cycle of solar-like stars at least, results from the interaction between (differential) rotation, convection, and magnetic field. The Kepler mission has been collecting data for a large number of stars during 4 years allowing us to investigate magnetic stellar cycles. We investigated the Kepler light curves to look for magnetic activity or even hints of magnetic activity cycles. Based on the photometric data we also looked for new magnetic indexes to characterise the magnetic activity of the stars. We selected a sample of 22 solar-like F stars that have a rotation period smaller than 12 days. We performed a time-frequency analysis using the Morlet wavelet yielding a magnetic proxy. We computed the magnetic index S_ph as the standard deviation of the whole time series and the index <S_ph> that is the mean of standard deviations measured in subseries of length five times the rotation period of the star. We defined new indicators to take into account the fact that complete magnetic cycles are not observed for all the stars, such as the contrast between high and low activity. We also inferred the Rossby number of the stars and studied their stellar background. This analysis shows different types of behaviours in the 22 F stars. Two stars show behaviours very similar to magnetic activity cycles. Five stars show long-lived spots or active regions suggesting the existence of active longitudes. Two stars of our sample seem to have a decreasing or increasing trend in the temporal variation of the magnetic proxies. Finally the last group of stars show magnetic activity (with presence of spots) but no sign of cycle.
  • Context. The object HD 43587Aa is a G0V star observed during the 145-day LRa03 run of the COnvection, ROtation and planetary Transits space mission (CoRoT), for which complementary High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectra with S/N>300 were also obtained. Its visual magnitude is 5.71, and its effective temperature is close to 5950 K. It has a known companion in a highly eccentric orbit and is also coupled with two more distant companions. Aims. We undertake a preliminary investigation of the internal structure of HD 43587Aa. Methods. We carried out a seismic analysis of the star, using maximum likelihood estimators and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Results. We established the first table of the eigenmode frequencies, widths, and heights for HD 43587Aa. The star appears to have a mass and a radius slightly larger than the Sun, and is slightly older (5.6 Gyr). Two scenarios are suggested for the geometry of the star: either its inclination angle is very low, or the rotation velocity of the star is very low. Conclusions. A more detailed study of the rotation and of the magnetic and chromospheric activity for this star is needed, and will be the subject of a further study. New high resolution spectrometric observations should be performed for at least several months in duration.
  • Asteroseismology of evolved solar-like stars is experiencing a growing interest due to the wealth of observational data from space-borne instruments such as the \emph{CoRoT} and \emph{Kepler} spacecraft. In particular, the recent detection of mixed modes, which probe both the innermost and uppermost layers of stars, paves the way for inferring the internal structure of stars along their evolution through the subgiant and red giant phases. Mixed modes can also place stringent constraints on the physics of such stars and on their global properties (mass, age, etc...). Here, using two \emph{Kepler} stars (KIC 4351319 and KIC 6442183), we demonstrate that measurements of mixed mode characteristics allow us to estimate the mode inertias, providing a new and additional diagnostics on the mode trapping and subsequently on the internal structure of evolved stars. We however stress that the accuracy may be sensitive to non-adiabatic effects.
  • The continuous high-precision photometric observations provided by the CoRoT and Kepler space missions have allowed us to better understand the structure and dynamics of red giants using asteroseismic techniques. A small fraction of these stars shows dipole modes with unexpectedly low amplitudes. The reduction in amplitude is more pronounced for stars with higher frequency of maximum power. In this work we want to characterize KIC 8561221 in order to confirm that it is currently the least evolved star among this peculiar subset and to discuss several hypotheses that could help explain the reduction of the dipole mode amplitudes. We used Kepler short- and long-cadence data combined with spectroscopic observations to infer the stellar structure and dynamics of KIC 8561221. We then discussed different scenarios that could contribute to the reduction of the dipole amplitudes such as a fast rotating interior or the effect of a magnetic field on the properties of the modes. We also performed a detailed study of the inertia and damping of the modes. We have been able to characterize 37 oscillations modes, in particular, a few dipole modes above nu_max that exhibit nearly normal amplitudes. We have inferred a surface rotation period of around 91 days and uncovered the existence of a variation in the surface magnetic activity during the last 4 years. As expected, the internal regions of the star probed by the l = 2 and 3 modes spin 4 to 8 times faster than the surface. With our grid of standard models we are able to properly fit the observed frequencies. Our model calculation of mode inertia and damping give no explanation for the depressed dipole modes. A fast rotating core is also ruled out as a possible explanation. Finally, we do not have any observational evidence of the presence of a strong deep magnetic field inside the star.
  • The dynamo process is believed to drive the magnetic activity of stars like the Sun that have an outer convection zone. Large spectroscopic surveys showed that there is a relation between the rotation periods and the cycle periods: the longer the rotation period is, the longer the magnetic activity cycle period will be. We present the analysis of F stars observed by Kepler for which individual p modes have been measure and with surface rotation periods shorter than 12 days. We defined magnetic indicators and proxies based on photometric observations to help characterise the activity levels of the stars. With the Kepler data, we investigate the existence of stars with cycles (regular or not), stars with a modulation that could be related to magnetic activity, and stars that seem to show a flat behaviour.
  • The high-quality, full-disk helioseismic observations continuously collected by the spectrophotometer GOLF and the three photometers VIRGO/SPMs onboard the SoHO spacecraft for 17 years now (since April 11, 1996, apart from the SoHO "vacations") are absolutely unique for the study of the interior of the Sun and its variability with magnetic activity. Here, we look at the differences in the low-degree oscillation p-mode frequencies between radial velocity and intensity measurements taking into account all the known features of the p-mode profiles (e.g., the opposite peak asymmetry), and of the power spectrum (e.g., the presence of the higher degrees l= 4 and 5 in the signal). We show that the intensity frequencies are higher than the velocity frequencies during the solar cycle with a clear temporal dependence. The response between the individual angular degrees is also different. Time delays are observed between the temporal variations in GOLF and VIRGO frequencies. Such analysis is important in order to put new constraints and to better understand the mechanisms responsible for the temporal variations of the oscillation frequencies with the solar magnetic activity as well as their height dependences in the solar atmosphere. It is also important for the study of the stellar magnetic activity using asteroseismic data.
  • The CoRoT short asteroseismic runs give us the opportunity to observe a large variety of late-type stars through their solar-like oscillations. We report the observation and modeling of the F5V star HD 175272. Our aim is to define a method for extracting as much information as possible from a noisy oscillation spectrum. We followed a differential approach that consists of using a well-known star as a reference to characterize another star. We used classical tools such as the envelope autocorrelation function to derive the global seismic parameters of the star. We compared HD 175272 with HD 181420 through a linear approach, because they appear to be asteroseismic twins. The comparison with the reference star enables us to substantially enhance the scientific output for HD 175272. First, we determined its global characteristics through a detailed seismic analysis of HD 181420. Second, with our differential approach, we measured the difference of mass, radius and age between HD 175272 and HD 181420. We have developed a general method able to derive asteroseismic constraints on a star even in case of low-quality data. %This method is based on the comparison to a star with common seismic and classical properties. Seismic data allow accurate measurements of radii and masses differences between the two stars. This method can be applied to stars with interesting properties but low signal-to-noise ratio oscillation spectrum, such as stars hosting an exoplanet or members of a binary system.