• The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low frequency interferomeric radio telescope. The MWA is the low frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and is the first of three SKA precursors to be operational, supporting a varied science mission ranging from the attempted detection of the Epoch of Reionisation to the monitoring of solar flares and space weather. We explore the possibility that the MWA can be used for the purposes of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). In particular we propose that the MWA can be used as an element of a passive radar facility operating in the frequency range 87.5 - 108 MHz (the commercial FM broadcast band). In this scenario the MWA can be considered the receiving element in a bi-static radar configuration, with FM broadcast stations serving as non-cooperative transmitters. The FM broadcasts propagate into space, are reflected off debris in Earth orbit, and are received at the MWA. The imaging capabilities of the MWA can be used to simultaneously detect multiple pieces of space debris, image their positions on the sky as a function of time, and provide tracking data that can be used to determine orbital parameters. Such a capability would be a valuable addition to Australian and global SSA assets, in terms of southern and eastern hemispheric coverage. We provide a feasibility assessment of this proposal, based on simple calculations and electromagnetic simulations that shows the detection of sub-metre size debris should be possible (debris radius of >0.5 m to ~1000 km altitude). We also present a proof-of-concept set of observations that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, based on the detection and tracking of the International Space Station via reflected FM broadcast signals originating in south-west Western Australia. These observations broadly validate our calculations and simulations.
  • We present a Stokes I, Q and U survey at 189 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array 32-element prototype covering 2400 square degrees. The survey has a 15.6 arcmin angular resolution and achieves a noise level of 15 mJy/beam. We demonstrate a novel interferometric data analysis that involves calibration of drift scan data, integration through the co-addition of warped snapshot images and deconvolution of the point spread function through forward modeling. We present a point source catalogue down to a flux limit of 4 Jy. We detect polarization from only one of the sources, PMN J0351-2744, at a level of 1.8 \pm 0.4%, whereas the remaining sources have a polarization fraction below 2%. Compared to a reported average value of 7% at 1.4 GHz, the polarization fraction of compact sources significantly decreases at low frequencies. We find a wealth of diffuse polarized emission across a large area of the survey with a maximum peak of ~13 K, primarily with positive rotation measure values smaller than +10 rad/m^2. The small values observed indicate that the emission is likely to have a local origin (closer than a few hundred parsecs). There is a large sky area at 2^h30^m where the diffuse polarized emission rms is fainter than 1 K. Within this area of low Galactic polarization we characterize the foreground properties in a cold sky patch at $(\alpha,\delta) = (4^h,-27^\circ.6)$ in terms of three dimensional power spectra
  • We have discovered three certain (SAX J1324.5-6313, 2S 1711-339 and SAX J1828.5-1037) and two likely (SAX J1818.7+1424 and SAX J2224.9+5421) new thermonuclear X-ray burst sources with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras, and observed a second burst ever from a sixth one (2S 0918-549). Four of them (excluding 2S 1711-339 and 2S 0918-549) are newly detected X-ray sources from which we observed single bursts, but no persistent emission. We observe the first 11 bursts ever from 2S 1711-339; persistent flux was detected during the first ten bursts, but not around the last burst. A single burst was recently detected from 2S 0918-549 by Jonker et al.(2001); we observe a second burst showing radius expansion, from which a distance of 4.2 kpc is derived. According to theory, bursts from very low flux levels should last ~100 s. Such is indeed the case for the last burst from 2S 1711-339, the single burst from SAX J1828.5-1037 and the two bursts from 2S 0918-549, but not for the bursts from SAX J1324.5-6313, SAX J1818.7+1424 and SAX J2224.9+5421. The bursts from the latter sources all last ~20 s. We suggest that SAX J1324.5-6313, SAX J1818.7+1424, SAX J1828.$-1037 and SAX J2224.9+5421 are members of the recently proposed class of bursters with distinctively low persistent flux levels, and show that the galactic distribution of this class is compatible with that of the standard low-mass X-ray binaries.
  • We report on results of a target of opportunity observation of the X-ray transient XTE J1118+480 performed on 2000 April 14-15 with the Narrow Field Instruments (0.1-200 keV) of the SAX satellite. The measured spectrum is a power law with a photon index of ~1.7 modified by an ultrasoft X-ray excess and a high-energy cutoff above ~100 keV. The soft excess is consistent with a blackbody with temperature of ~40 eV and a low flux, while the cut-off power law is well fitted by thermal Comptonization in a plasma with an electron temperature of 100 keV and an optical depth of order of unity. Consistent with the weakness of the blackbody, Compton reflection is weak. Though the data are consistent with various geometries of the hot and cold phases of the accreting gas, we conclude that a hot accretion disk is the most plausible model. The Eddington ratio implied by recent estimates of the mass and the distance is about 10^{-3}, which may indicate that advection is probably not the dominant cooling mechanism. We finally suggest that the reflecting medium has a low metallicity, consistent with location of the system in the halo.
  • We report on 4 BeppoSAX Target Of Opportunity observations of MXB 1730-335, the Rapid Burster (RB), made during the 1998 February-March outburst. In the first observation, approximately 20 days after the outburst peak, the X-ray light curve showed Type II bursts at a rate of 43 per hour. Nine days later, during the second BeppoSAX pointing, only 5 Type II bursts were detected at the beginning of the observation. During the third pointing no X-ray bursts were detected and in the fourth and final observation the RB was not detected at all. Persistent emission from the RB was detected up to 10 keV during the first three pointings. The spectra of the persistent and bursting emissions below 10 keV were best fit with a model consisting of two blackbodies. An additional component (a power law) was needed to describe the 1-100 keV bursting spectrum when the persistent emission was subtracted. To our knowledge, this is the first detection of the RB beyond 20 keV. We discuss the evolution of the spectral parameters for the bursting and persistent emission during the outburst decay. The light curve, after the second BeppoSAX pointing, showed a steepening of the previous decay trend, and a sharper decay rate leading to quiescence was observed with BeppoSAX in the two subsequent observations. We interpret this behaviour as caused by the onset of the propeller effect. Finally, we infer a neutron star magnetic field B ~ 4 10^8 Gauss.
  • We have discovered with the Wide Field Cameras on board BeppoSAX the weak transient X-ray source SAXJ2239.3+6116 whose position coincides with that of 4U2238+60/3A2237+608 and is close to that of the fast transient AT2238+60 and the unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. The data suggest that the source exhibits outbursts that last for a few weeks and peak to a flux of 4E-10 erg/s/cm2 (2-10 keV) at maximum. During the peak the X-ray spectrum is hard with a photon index of -1.1+/-0.1. Follow-up observations with the Narrow-Field Instruments on the same platform revealed a quiescent emission level that is 1E+3 times less. Searches through the data archive of the All-Sky Monitor on RXTE result in the recognition of five outbursts in total from this source during 1996-1999, with a regular interval time of 262 days. Optical observations with the KPNO 2.1 m telescope provide a likely optical counterpart. It is a B0 V to B2 III star with broadened emission lines at an approximate distance of 4.4 kpc. The distance implies a 2-10 keV luminosity in the range from 1E+33 to 1E+36 erg/s. The evidence suggests that SAXJ2239.3+6116 is a Be X-ray binary with an orbital period of 262 days.
  • We have investigated the X-ray timing properties of XTE J1550-564 during 60 RXTE PCA observations made between 1998 September 18 and November 28. We detect quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) near 185 Hz during four time intervals. The QPO widths (FWHM) are near 50 Hz, and the rms amplitudes are about 1% of the mean flux at 2-30 keV. This is the third Galactic black hole candidate known to exhibit a transient X-ray timing signature above 50 Hz, following the 67 Hz QPO in GRS1915+105 and the 300 Hz QPO in GRO J1655-40. However, unlike the previous cases, which appear to show stationary frequencies, the QPO frequency in XTE J1550-564 must vary by at least 10% to be consistent with observations. The occurrences and properties of the QPO were insensitive to large changes in the X-ray intensity (1.5 to 6.8 Crab). However, the QPO appearance was accompanied by changes in the energy spectrum, namely, an increase in the temperature and a decrease in the normalization of the thermal component. The QPO is also closely related to the hard X-ray power-law component of the energy spectrum since the fractional amplitude of the QPO increases with photon energy. The fast QPOs in accreting black hole binaries are thought to be effects of general relativity; however, the relevance of the specific physical models that have been proposed remains largely uncertain. Low frequency QPOs in the range 3-13 Hz were often observed. Occasionally at high luminosity the rms QPO amplitude was 15% of the flux, a level previously reached only by GRS1915+105.
  • We discuss the properties of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy LB 1727, also known as 1H 0419-577, from X-ray observations obtained by ASCA and ROSAT along with optical observations from earlier epochs. ASCA shows only modest (< 20%) variations in X-ray flux within or between the observations. In contrast, a daily monitoring campaign over 1996 Jun - Sept by the ROSAT HRI instrument reveals the soft X-ray (0.1-2 keV) flux to have increased by a factor ~3. The 2 - 10 keV continuum can be parameterized as a power-law with a photon index Gamma ~ 1.45-1.68 across ~0.7 - 11 keV in the rest-frame. We also report the first detection of iron Kalpha line emission in this source. Simultaneous ASCA and ROSAT data show the X-ray spectrum to steepen sharply at a rest-energy \~0.75 keV, the spectrum below this energy can be parameterized as a power-law of slope Gamma ~3.6. We show that LB 1727 is one of the few Seyferts for which we can rule out the possibility that the presence of a warm absorber is solely responsible for the spectral steepening in the soft X-ray regime. Consideration of the overall spectral-energy-distribution for this source indicates the presence of a pronounced XUV-bump visible in optical, ultraviolet and soft X-ray data.
  • We report simultaneous X-ray and infrared (IR) observations of the Galactic microquasar GRS1915+105 using XTE and the Palomar 200-inch telescope on August 13-15, 1997 UTC. During the last two nights, the microquasar GRS 1915+105 exhibited quasi-regular X-ray/infrared (IR) flares with a spacing of $\sim 30$ minutes. While the physical mechanism triggering the flares is currently unknown, the one-to-one correspondence and consistent time offset between the X-ray and IR flares establish a close link between the two. At late times in the flares the X-ray and IR bands appear to ``decouple'', with the X-ray band showing large-amplitude fast oscillations while the IR shows a much smoother, more symmetrical decline. In at least three cases, the IR flare has returned to near its minimum while the X-rays continue in the elevated oscillatory state, ruling out thermal reprocessing of the X-ray flux as the source of IR flare. Furthermore, observations of similar IR and radio flares by Fender et al. (1997) imply that the source of the IR flux in such flares is synchrotron emission. The common rise and subsequent decoupling of the X-ray and IR flux and probable synchrotron origin of the IR emission is consistent with a scenario wherein the IR flux originates in a relativistic plasma which has been ejected from the inner accretion disk. In that case, these simultaneous X-ray/IR flares from a black-hole/relativistic-jet system are the first clear observational evidence linking of the time-dependent interaction of the jet and the inner disk in decades of quasar and microquasar studies.
  • The galactic superluminal motion source GRS 1915+105 was observed with RXTE at several occasions during its ongoing active state. The observed X-ray intensity changes drastically on a variety of time scales ranging from sub-seconds to days. In particular, the source exhibits quasi-periodic brightness sputters with varying duration and repetition time scale. These episodes occur occasionally, while the more common X-ray intensity variations are faster with much smaller amplitudes. The spectrum during the brightness sputters is remarkably different from the spectrum of the mean high state emission. We argue that such sputtering episodes are possibly caused by a major accretion disk instability. Based on the coincidence in time of two radio flares following the observed X-ray sputtering episodes we speculate that superluminal ejections (as observed from GRS 1915+105 during earlier activity periods) are related to episodes of large amplitude X-ray variations.
  • A comparison of ROSAT observations with simultaneous BATSE monitoring data shows a different intensity evolution in the soft and hard X-ray band of GRS 1915+105 since 1992. In addition, fits of simultaneous ROSAT/BATSE spectra require more than one spectral component. A short description of results of RXTE pointed observations of GRS 1915+105 since April 1996 is also presented.