• Aims. The structural inhomogeneities and kinematics of massive star nebulae are tracers of their mass-loss history. We conduct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic analysis of the ejecta of eta Car outside its famous Homunculus nebula. Methods. We carried out the first large-scale integral field unit observations of eta Car in the optical, covering a field of view of 1'x1' centered on the star. Observations with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal the detailed three-dimensional structure of eta Car's outer ejecta. Morpho-kinematic modeling of these ejecta is conducted with the code SHAPE. Results. The largest coherent structure in eta Car's outer ejecta can be described as a bent cylinder with roughly the same symmetry axis as the Homunculus nebula. This large outer shell is interacting with the surrounding medium, creating soft X-ray emission. We establish the shape and extent of the ghost shell in front of the southern Homunculus lobe and confirm that the NN condensation can best be modeled as a bowshock in the orbital/equatorial plane. Conclusions. The SHAPE modeling of the MUSE observations indicates that the kinematics of the outer ejecta measured with MUSE can be described by a spatially coherent structure, and this structure also correlates with the extended soft X-ray emission associated with the outer debris field. The ghost shell just outside the southern Homunculus lobe hints at a sequence of eruptions within the time frame of the Great Eruption from 1837-1858 or possibly a later shock/reverse shock velocity separation. Our 3D morpho-kinematic modeling and the MUSE observations constitute an invaluable dataset to be confronted with future radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. Such a comparison may shed light on the yet elusive physical mechanism responsible for eta Car-like eruptions.
  • This work presents CHARA/VEGA H$\alpha$ spectro-interferometry (R ~ 6000, and $\lambda$/2B ~ 1 mas) of HD 179218 and HD 141569, doubling the sample of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars for which this type of observations is available so far. The observed H$\alpha$ emission is spatially unresolved, indicating that the size of the H$\alpha$ emitting region is smaller than ~ 0.21 and 0.12 au for HD 179218 and HD 141529 (~ 15 and 16 R*, respectively). This is smaller than for the two other HAeBes previously observed with the same instrumentation. Two different scenarios have been explored in order to explain the compact line emitting regions. A hot, several thousand K, blackbody disc is consistent with the observations of HD 179218 and HD 141569. Magnetospheric accretion (MA) is able to reproduce the bulk of the H$\alpha$ emission shown by HD 179218, confirming previous estimates from MA shock modelling with a mass accretion rate of 10^-8 Msun/yr, and an inclination to the line of sight between 30 and 50 degr. The H$\alpha$ profile of HD 141569 cannot be fitted from MA due to the high rotational velocity of this object. Putting the CHARA sample together, a variety of scenarios is required to explain the H$\alpha$ emission in HAeBe stars -compact or extended, discs, accretion, and winds-, in agreement with previous Br$\gamma$ spectro-interferometric observations.
  • Not all stars exhibiting the optical spectral characteristics of B[e] stars share the same evolutionary stage. The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with uncertain classification, with previous work suggesting pre- and post-main sequence classification. Our goal is to settle this debate and provide reliable evolutionary classification. Integral field spectrograph observations with VLT MUSE of the cluster SH 2-266 are used to analyze the nature of MWC 137. A collimated outflow is discovered that is geometrically centered on MWC 137. The central position of MWC 137 in the cluster SH 2-266 within the larger nebula suggests strongly that it is a member of this cluster and that it is both at the origin of the nebula and the newly discovered jet. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram of the brightest cluster stars with stellar evolutionary models results in a distance of about 5.2$\pm$1.4 kpc. We estimate that the cluster is at least 3 Myr old. The jet extends over 66" (1.7 pc) projected on the plane of the sky, shows several knots, and projected velocities of up to $\pm$450 km s$^{-1}$. From the Balmer emission line decrement of the diffuse intracluster nebulosity we determine E(B-V)=1.4 mag for the inner 1' cluster region. The spectral energy distribution of the brightest cluster stars yield a slightly lower extinction of E(B-V)~1.2 mag. The extinction towards MWC 137 is estimated to be E(B-V)~1.8 mag (A$_V$~5.6 mag). Our analysis of the optical and near-infrared color-magnitude and color-color diagrams suggests a post-main sequence stage of MWC 137. The existence of a jet in this object implies the presence of an accretion disk.
  • We present spatially and spectrally resolved Br-gamma emission around the planet-hosting, transitional Herbig Ae/Be star HD 100546. Aiming to gain insight into the physical origin of the line in possible relation to accretion processes, we carried out Br-gamma spectro-interferometry using AMBER/VLTI from three different baselines achieving spatial and spectral resolutions of 2-4 mas and 12000. The Br-gamma visibility is larger than that of the continuum for all baselines. Differential phases reveal a shift between the photocentre of the Br-gamma line -displaced 0.6 mas (0.06 au at 100 pc) NE from the star- and that of the K-band continuum emission -displaced 0.3 mas NE from the star. The photocentres of the redshifted and blueshifted components of the Br-gamma line are located NW and SE from the photocentre of the peak line emission, respectively. Moreover, the photocentre of the fastest velocity bins within the spectral line tends to be closer to that of the peak emission than the photocentre of the slowest velocity bins. Our results are consistent with a Br-gamma emitting region inside the dust inner rim (<0.25 au) and extending very close to the central star, with a Keplerian, disc-like structure rotating counter-clockwise, and most probably flared (25 deg). Even though the main contribution to the Br-gamma line does not come from gas magnetically channelled on to the star, accretion on to HD 100546 could be magnetospheric, implying a mass accretion rate of a few 10^-7 Msun/yr. This value indicates that the observed gas has to be replenished on time-scales of a few months to years, perhaps by planet-induced flows from the outer to the inner disc as has been reported for similar systems.
  • Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (L_acc and L_line) of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) L_acc-L_line correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L_star) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the L_acc-L_line correlations depend on the L_acc-L_star relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the L_acc-L_star correlation immediately implies that L_acc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the L_acc-L_line correlations alone do not prove any physical connection with accretion but can only be used with practical purposes to roughly estimate accretion rates. When looking for correlations with possible physical meaning, we suggest that L_acc/L_star and L_line/L_star should be used instead of L_acc and L_line. Finally, the finding that L_acc has a steeper dependence on L_star for T-Tauri stars than for intermediate-mass Herbig Ae/Be stars is also discussed. That is explained from the magnetospheric accretion scenario and the different photospheric properties in the near-UV.
  • HD 142527 is a young pre-main sequence star with properties indicative of the presence of a giant planet or/and a low-mass stellar companion. We have analyzed an X-Shooter/Very Large Telescope spectrum to provide accurate stellar parameters and accretion rate. The analysis of the spectrum, together with constraints provided by the SED fitting, the distance to the star (140 +- 20 pc) and the use of evolutionary tracks and isochrones, lead to the following set of parameters T_eff = 6550 +- 100 K, log g = 3.75 +- 0.10, L_*/L_sun = 16.3 +- 4.5, M_*/M_sun = 2.0 +- 0.3 and an age of 5.0 +- 1.5 Myr. This stellar age provides further constrains to the mass of the possible companion estimated by Biller et al. (2012), being in-between 0.20 and 0.35 M_sun. Stellar accretion rates obtained from UV Balmer excess modelling, optical photospheric line veiling, and from the correlations with several emission lines spanning from the UV to the near-IR, are consistent to each other. The mean value from all previous tracers is 2 (+- 1) x 10^-7 M_sun yr^-1, which is within the upper limit gas flow rate from the outer to the inner disk recently provided by Cassasus et al. (2013). This suggests that almost all gas transferred between both components of the disk is not trapped by the possible planet(s) in-between but fall onto the central star, although it is discussed how the gap flow rate could be larger than previously suggested. In addition, we provide evidence showing that the stellar accretion rate of HD 142527 has increased by a factor ~ 7 on a timescale of 2-5 years.
  • We initiated long-term optical interferometry monitoring of the diameters of unstable yellow hypergiants (YHG) with the goal of detecting both the long-term evolution of their radius and shorter term formation related to large mass-loss events. We observed HR5171 A with AMBER/VLTI. We also examined archival photometric data in the visual and near-IR spanning more than 60 years, as well as sparse spectroscopic data. HR5171A exhibits a complex appearance. Our AMBER data reveal a surprisingly large star for a YHG R*=1315+/-260Rsun\ (~6.1AU) at the distance of 3.6+/-0.5kpc. The source is surrounded by an extended nebulosity, and these data also show a large level of asymmetry in the brightness distribution of the system, which we attribute to a newly discovered companion star located in front of the primary star. The companion's signature is also detected in the visual photometry, which indicates an orbital period of Porb=1304+/-6d. Modeling the light curve with the NIGHTFALL program provides clear evidence that the system is a contact or possibly over-contact eclipsing binary. A total current system mass of 39^{+40}_{-22} solar mass and a high mass ratio q>10 is inferred for the system. The low-mass companion of HR5171 A is very close to the primary star that is embedded within its dense wind. Tight constraints on the inclination and vsini of the primary are lacking, which prevents us from determining its influence precisely on the mass-loss phenomenon, but the system is probably experiencing a wind Roche-Lobe overflow. Depending on the amount of angular momentum that can be transferred to the stellar envelope, HR5171 A may become a fast-rotating B[e]/Luminous Blue Variable (LBV)/Wolf-Rayet star. In any case, HR5171 A highlights the possible importance of binaries for interpreting the unstable YHGs and for massive star evolution in general.
  • This work presents X-Shooter/VLT spectra of the prototypical, isolated Herbig Ae stars HD 31648 (MWC 480) and HD 163296 over five epochs separated by timescales ranging from days to months. Each spectrum spans over a wide wavelength range covering from 310 to 2475 nm. We have monitored the continuum excess in the Balmer region of the spectra and the luminosity of twelve ultraviolet, optical and near infrared spectral lines that are commonly used as accretion tracers for T Tauri stars. The observed strengths of the Balmer excesses have been reproduced from a magnetospheric accretion shock model, providing a mean mass accretion rate of 1.11 x 10^-7 and 4.50 x 10^-7 Msun yr^-1 for HD 31648 and HD 163296, respectively. Accretion rate variations are observed, being more pronounced for HD 31648 (up to 0.5 dex). However, from the comparison with previous results it is found that the accretion rate of HD 163296 has increased by more than 1 dex, on a timescale of ~ 15 years. Averaged accretion luminosities derived from the Balmer excess are consistent with the ones inferred from the empirical calibrations with the emission line luminosities, indicating that those can be extrapolated to HAe stars. In spite of that, the accretion rate variations do not generally coincide with those estimated from the line luminosities, suggesting that the empirical calibrations are not useful to accurately quantify accretion rate variability.
  • HD 327083 is a sgB[e] star that forms a binary system with an orbital semi-major axis of ~1.7 AU. Our previous observations using the VLTI and AMBER in the medium resolution K-band mode spatially resolved the environment of HD 327083. The continuum visibilities obtained indicate the presence of a circumbinary disc. CO bandhead emission was also observed. However, due to the limited spectral resolution of the previous observations, the kinematic structure of the emitting material was not constrained. In this paper, we address this and probe the source of the CO emission with high spectral resolution and spatial precision. We have observed HD 327083 with high spectral resolution (25 & 6 km/s) using AMBER and CRIRES. The observations are compared to kinematical models to constrain the source of the emission. It is shown that the CO bandhead emission can be reproduced using a model of a Keplerian disc with an inclination and size consistent with our previous VLTI observations. The model is compared to AMBER differential phase measurements, which have a precision as high as 30-micro-arcseconds. A differential phase signal corresponding to 0.15 milli-arcseconds (~5 sigma) is seen over the bandhead emission, which is in excellent agreement with the model that fits the CRIRES observations. In comparison, a model of an equatorial outflow, as envisaged in the standard sgB[e] scenario, does not reproduce the observations well. The excellent agreement between the disc model and observations in the spatial and spectral domains is compelling evidence that the CO bandhead emission of HD 327083 originates in a circumbinary Keplerian disc. In contrast, the model of an equatorial outflow cannot reproduce the observations well. This suggests that the standard sgB[e] scenario is not applicable to HD 327083, which supports the hypothesis that the B[e] behaviour of HD 327083 is due to binarity (ABRIDGED).
  • We present a study of the kinematical properties of a small sample of nearby near-infrared bright massive and intermediate mass young stellar objects using emission lines sensitive to discs and winds. We show for the first time that the broad ($\sim500$kms$^{-1}$) symmetric line wings on the HI Brackett series lines are due to Stark broadening or electron scattering, rather than pure Doppler broadening due to high speed motion. The results are consistent with the presence of a very dense circumstellar environment. In addition, many of these lines show evidence for weak line self-absorption, suggestive of a wind or disc-wind origin for that part of the absorbing material. The weakness of the self-absorption suggests a large opening angle for such an outflow. We also study the fluorescent 1.688$\mu$m FeII line, which is sensitive to dense material. We fitted a Keplerian disc model to this line, and find reasonable fits in all bar one case, in agreement with previous finding for classical Be stars that fluorescent iron transitions are reasonable disc tracers. Overall the picture is one in which these stars still have accretion discs, with a very dense inner circumstellar environment which may be tracing either the inner regions of a disc, or of a stellar wind, and in which ionised outflow is also present. The similarity with lower mass stars is striking, suggesting that at least in this mass range they form in a similar fashion.
  • While the presence of discs around classical Be stars is well established, their origin is still uncertain. To understand what processes result in the creation of these discs and how angular momentum is transported within them, their physical properties must be constrained. This requires comparing high spatial and spectral resolution data with detailed radiative transfer modelling. We present a high spectral resolution, R~80,000, sub milli-arcsecond precision, spectroastrometric study of the circumstellar disc around the Be star beta CMi. The data are confronted with three-dimensional, NLTE radiative transfer calculations to directly constrain the properties of the disc. Furthermore, we compare the data to disc models featuring two velocity laws; Keperian, the prediction of the viscous disc model, and angular momentum conserving rotation. It is shown that the observations of beta CMi can only be reproduced using Keplerian rotation. The agreement between the model and the observed SED, polarisation and spectroastrometric signature of beta CMi confirms that the discs around Be stars are well modelled as viscous decretion discs.
  • We performed a mid-infrared imaging survey of evolved stars in order to study the dust distribution in circumstellar envelopes around these objects and to better understand the mass-loss mechanism responsible for the formation of these envelopes. During this survey, we resolved for the first time the circumstellar environment of IRAS 17163-3907 (hereinafter IRAS17163), which is one of the brightest objects in the mid-infrared sky, but is surprisingly not well studied. Our aim is to determine the evolutionary status of IRAS 17163 and study its circumstellar environment in order to understand its mass-loss history. We obtained diffraction-limited images of IRAS 17163 in the mid-infrared using VISIR on the VLT. Optical spectra of the object allowed us to determine its spectral type and estimate its distance via the presence of diffuse interstellar bands. We show that IRAS 17163 is a Post-Red Supergiant, possibly belonging to the rare class of Yellow Hypergiants, and is very similar to the well studied object IRC +10420. Our mid-infrared images of IRAS 17163 are the first direct images of this bright mid-infrared source. These images clearly show the presence of a double dusty detached shell around the central star, due to successive ejections of material with a timescale of the order of 400 years and a total circumstellar mass larger than 4 M$_{\odot}$. This indicates that non quiescent mass-loss occurs during this phase of stellar evolution.
  • This work aims to derive accretion rates for a sample of 38 HAeBe stars. We apply magnetospheric accretion (MA) shock modelling to reproduce the observed Balmer excesses. We look for possible correlations with the strength of the Halpha, [OI]6300, and Brgamma emission lines. The median mass accretion rate is 2 x 10^-7 Msun yr^-1 in our sample. The model fails to reproduce the large Balmer excesses shown by the four hottest stars (T* > 12000 K). We derive Macc propto M*^5 and Lacc propto L*^1.2 for our sample, with scatter. Empirical calibrations relating the accretion and the Halpha, [OI]6300, and Brgamma luminosities are provided. The slopes in our expressions are slightly shallower than those for lower mass stars, but the difference is within the uncertainties, except for the [OI]6300 line. The Halpha 10% width is uncorrelated with Macc, unlike for the lower mass regime. The mean Halpha width shows higher values as the projected rotational velocities of HAe stars increase, which agrees with MA. The accretion rate variations in the sample are typically lower than 0.5 dex on timescales of days to months, Our data suggest that the changes in the Balmer excess are uncorrelated to the simultaneous changes of the line luminosities. The Balmer excesses and Halpha line widths of HAe stars can be interpreted within the context of MA, which is not the case for several HBes. The steep trend relating Macc and M* can be explained from the mass-age distribution characterizing HAeBe stars. The line luminosities used for low-mass objects are also valid to estimate typical accretion rates for the intermediate-mass regime under similar empirical expressions. However, we suggest that several of these calibrations are driven by the stellar luminosity.
  • The majority of the pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars reside in binary systems. As these systems are young, their properties may contain an imprint of the star formation process at intermediate masses. However, these systems are generally spatially unresolved, making it difficult to probe their circumstellar environment to search for manifestations of their formation process, such as accretion disks. Here we investigate the formation mechanism of Herbig Ae/Be (HAe/Be) binary systems by studying the relative orientation of their binary orbits and circumstellar disks. We present linear spectropolarimetric observations of HAe/Be stars over the Halpha line, which are used to determine the orientation of their circumstellar disks. In conjunction with data from the literature, we obtain a sample of 20 binaries with known disk position angles (PAs). We compare our disk PA data to a model to investigate whether HAe/Be binary systems and their disks are co-planar. Moreover, in the light of a recent suggestion that some HAe/Be star spectropolarimetric signatures may not necessarily be related to circumstellar disks, we re-assess the relationship between spectropolarimetric signatures and disk PAs. We do this by comparing spectropolarimetric and high spatial resolution observations of young stellar objects. We find that spectropolarimetric observations of pre-main-sequence stars do trace circumstellar disks. This finding is significant above the 3 sigma level. Using this result, our data are entirely consistent with the situation in which HAe/Be binary systems and circumstellar disks are co-planar, while random orientations can be rejected at the 2.2 sigma level. We conclude that HAe/Be binary systems and the disks around the primaries are likely to be co-planar, which is consistent with the notion that these systems form via monolithic collapse and subsequent disk fragmentation (abridged).
  • We analysed 337 multi-epoch optical spectra of 38 Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars to gain insights into the variability behaviour of the circumstellar (CS) atomic gas. Equivalent widths (EWs) and line fluxes of the Halpha, [OI]6300, HeI5876 and NaID lines were obtained for each spectrum; the Halpha line width at 10% of peak intensity (W10) and profile shapes were also measured and classified. The mean line strengths and relative variabilities were quantified for each star. Simultaneous optical photometry was used to estimate the line fluxes. We present a homogeneous spectroscopic database of HAeBe stars. The lines are variable in practically all stars and timescales, although 30 % of the objects show a constant EW in [OI]6300, which is also the only line that shows no variability on timescales of hours. The HeI5876 and NaID EW relative variabilities are typically the largest, followed by those in [OI]6300 and Halpha. The EW changes can be larger than one order of magnitude for the HeI5876 line, and up to a factor 4 for Halpha. The [OI]6300 and Halpha EW relative variabilities are correlated for most stars in the sample. The Halpha mean EW and W10 are uncorrelated, as are their relative variabilities. The Halpha profile changes in 70 % of the objects. The massive stars in the sample usually show more stable Halpha profiles with blueshifted self-absorptions and less variable 10% widths. Our data suggest multiple causes for the different line variations, but the [OI]6300 and Halpha variability must share a similar origin in many objects. The physical mechanism responsible for the Halpha line broadening does not depend on the amount of emission; unlike in lower-mass stars, physical properties based on the Halpha luminosity and W10 would significantly differ. Our results provide additional support to previous works that reported different physical mechanisms in Herbig Ae and Herbig Be stars.
  • We apply mid-infrared spectro-interferometry to the massive young stellar object CRL2136. The observations were performed with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer and the MIDI instrument at a 42m baseline probing angular scales of 50 milli-arcseconds. We model the observed visibilities in parallel with diffraction-limited images at both 24.5micron and in the N-band (with resolutions of 0.6" and 0.3", respectively), as well as the spectral energy distribution. The arcsec-scale spatial information reveals the well-resolved emission from the dusty envelope. By simultaneously modelling the spatial and spectral data, we find that the bulk of the dust emission occurs at several dust sublimation radii (approximately 170 AU). This reproduces the high mid-infrared fluxes and at the same time the low visibilities observed in the MIDI data for wavelengths longward of 8.5micron. However, shortward of this wavelength the visibility data show a sharp up-turn indicative of compact emission. We discuss various potential sources of this emission. We exclude a dust disk being responsible for the observed spectral imprint on the visibilities. A cool supergiant star and an accretion disk are considered and both shown to be viable origins of the compact mid-infrared emission. We propose that CRL2136 is embedded in a dusty envelope, which truncates at several times the dust sublimation radius. A dust torus is manifest in the equatorial region. We find that the spectro-interferometric N-band signal can be reproduced by either a gaseous disk or a bloated central star. If the disk extends to the stellar surface, it accretes at a rate of 3.0 10^(-3) Msun/yr.
  • Context: The Red MSX Source (RMS) survey is returning a large sample of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and ultra-compact (UC) \HII{} regions using follow-up observations of colour-selected candidates from the MSX point source catalogue. Aims: To obtain the bolometric fluxes and, using kinematic distance information, the luminosities for young RMS sources with far-infrared fluxes. Methods: We use a model spectral energy distribution (SED) fitter to obtain the bolometric flux for our sources, given flux data from our work and the literature. The inputs to the model fitter were optimised by a series of investigations designed to reveal the effect varying these inputs had on the resulting bolometric flux. Kinematic distances derived from molecular line observations were then used to calculate the luminosity of each source. Results: Bolometric fluxes are obtained for 1173 young RMS sources, of which 1069 have uniquely constrained kinematic distances and good SED fits. A comparison of the bolometric fluxes obtained using SED fitting with trapezium rule integration and two component greybody fits was also undertaken, and showed that both produce considerable scatter compared to the method used here. Conclusions: The bolometric flux results allowed us to obtain the luminosity distributions of YSOs and UC\HII{} regions in the RMS sample, which we find to be different. We also find that there are few MYSOs with L $\geq$ 10$^{5}$\lsol{}, despite finding many MYSOs with 10$^{4}$\lsol{} $\geq$ L $\geq$ 10$^{5}$\lsol{}.
  • We present high resolution (R~50,000) spectroastrometry over the CO 1st overtone bandhead of a sample of seven intermediate/massive young stellar objects. These are primarily drawn from the red MSX source (RMS) survey, a systematic search for young massive stars which has returned a large, well selected sample of such objects. The mean luminosity of the sample is approximately 5 times 10^4 L_\odot, indicating the objects typically have a mass of ~15 solar masses. We fit the observed bandhead profiles with a model of a circumstellar disc, and find good agreement between the models and observations for all but one object. We compare the high angular precision (0.2-0.8 mas) spectroastrometric data to the spatial distribution of the emitting material in the best-fitting models. No spatial signatures of discs are detected, which is entirely consistent with the properties of the best-fitting models. Therefore, the observations suggest that the CO bandhead emission of massive young stellar objects originates in small-scale disks, in agreement with previous work. This provides further evidence that massive stars form via disc accretion, as suggested by recent simulations.
  • Context: The Red MSX Source (RMS) survey is a multi-wavelength campaign of follow-up observations of a colour-selected sample of candidate massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the galactic plane. This survey is returning the largest well-selected sample of MYSOs to date, while identifying other dust contaminant sources with similar mid-infrared colours including a large number of new ultra-compact (UC)HII regions. Aims:To measure the far-infrared (IR) flux, which lies near the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MYSOs and UCHII regions, so that, together with distance information, the luminosity of these sources can be obtained. Methods:Less than 50% of RMS sources are associated with IRAS point sources with detections at 60 micron and 100 micron, though the vast majority are visible in Spitzer MIPSGAL or IRAS Galaxy Atlas (IGA) images. However, standard aperture photometry is not appropriate for these data due to crowding of sources and strong spatially variable far-IR background emission in the galactic plane. A new technique using a 2-dimensional fit to the background in an annulus around each source is therefore used to obtain far-IR photometry for young RMS sources. Results:Far-IR fluxes are obtained for a total of 1113 RMS candidates identified as young sources. Of these 734 have flux measurements using IGA 60 micron and 100 micron images and 724 using MIPSGAL 70 micron images, with 345 having measurements in both data sets.
  • The circumstellar structure on 100 AU scales of the massive young stellar object W33A is probed using the VLTI and the MIDI instrument. N-band visibilities on 4 baselines are presented which are inconsistent with a spherically symmetric geometry. The visibility spectra and SED are simultaneously compared to 2D axi-symmetric dust radiative transfer models with a geometry including a rotationally flattened envelope and outflow cavities. We assume an O7.5 ZAMS star as the central source, consistent with the observed bolometric luminosity. The observations are also compared to models with and without (dusty and gaseous) accretion disks. A satisfactory model is constructed which reproduces the visibility spectra for each (u,v) point. It fits the silicate absorption, the mid-IR slope, the far-infrared peak, and the (sub)mm of the SED. It produces a 350 micron morphology consistent with observations. The 10 micron emission on 100 AU scales is dominated by the irradiated walls of the cavity sculpted by the outflow. The visibilities rule out the presence of dust disks with total (gas and dust) masses more than 0.01 Msun. However, optically thick accretion disks, interior to the dust sublimation radius, are allowed to accrete at rates equalling the envelope's mass infall rate (up to 10^(-3) Msun/yr) without substantially affecting the visibilities due to the extinction by the extremely massive envelope of W33A.
  • We present B and R band spectroastrometry of a sample of 45 Herbig Ae/Be stars in order to study their binary properties. All but one of the targets known to be binary systems with a separation of ~0.1-2.0 arcsec are detected by a distinctive spectroastrometric signature. Some objects in the sample exhibit spectroastrometric features that do not appear attributable to a binary system. We find that these may be due to light reflected from dusty halos or material entrained in winds. We present 8 new binary detections and 4 detections of an unknown component in previously discovered binary systems. The data confirm previous reports that Herbig Ae/Be stars have a high binary fraction, 74+/-6 per cent in the sample presented here. We use a spectroastrometric deconvolution technique to separate the spatially unresolved binary spectra into the individual constituent spectra. The separated spectra allow us to ascertain the spectral type of the individual binary components, which in turn allows the mass ratio of these systems to be determined. In addition, we appraise the method used and the effects of contaminant sources of flux. We find that the distribution of system mass ratios is inconsistent with random pairing from the Initial Mass Function, and that this appears robust despite a detection bias. Instead, the mass ratio distribution is broadly consistent with the scenario of binary formation via disk fragmentation.
  • (abridged) As the favoured progenitors of long-duration gamma-ray bursts, massive stars may represent our best signposts of individual objects in the early Universe, but special conditions seem required to make these bursters, which might originate from the progenitor's rapid rotation and associated asymmetry. To obtain empirical constraints on the interplay between stellar rotation and wind asymmetry, we perform linear Halpha spectropolarimetry on a sample of 18 spectroscopically peculiar massive O stars, including OVz, Of?p, Oe, and Onfp stars, supplemented by an earlier sample of 20 O supergiants. Despite their rapid rotation (with vsin(i) up to 400 km/s) most O-type stars are found to be spherically symmetric, but with notable exceptions amongst specific object classes. We divide the peculiar O stars into four distinct categories: Groups III and IV include the Oe stars and Onfp stars, which are on the high-end tail of the O star rotation distribution and have in the past been claimed to be embedded in disks. Here we report the detection of a classical depolarization ``line effect'' in the Oe star HD 45314, but the overall incidence of line effects amongst Oe stars is significantly lower (1 out of 6) than amongst Be stars. The chance that the Oe and Be datasets are drawn from the same parent population is negligible (with 95% confidence). This implies there is as yet no evidence for a disk hypothesis in Oe stars, providing relevant constraints on the physical mechanism that is responsible for the Be phenomenon. Finally, we find that 3 out of 4 of the group IV Onfp stars show evidence for complex polarization effects, which are likely related to rapid rotation, and we speculate on the evolutionary links to B[e] stars.
  • The prototype of the Beta Cep class of pulsating stars, Beta Cep, rotates relatively slowly, and yet displays episodic Halpha emission. Such behaviour is typical of a classical Be star. For some time this posed a contradiction to our understanding of the Be phenomena as rapid rotation is thought to be a prerequisite for the emission phases of Be stars. Recent work has demonstrated that the Halpha emission is in fact due to a close companion (separation ~0.25") of the star. This resolves the apparent enigma if this close companion is a classical Be star. We aim to test the hypothesis that this close companion is a valid Be star by determining properties such as its spectral type and vsin i. We employed spectroastrometry to investigate the close binary system. Using the spectroastrometric signatures observed, we split the composite binary spectra into its constituent spectra in the B band and R band. The split spectra allow us to estimate spectral types of the binary components. We find that the primary of the close binary system has a spectral type of B2III and the secondary a spectral type of B5Ve. From the relationship between mass and spectral type, we determine the masses of the binary components to be M_p = 12.6+/-3.2 M_* and M_s = 4.4+/-0.7 M_* respectively. The spectroastrometric data allow some constraint on the orbit, and we suggest a moderate revision to the previously determined orbit. We confirm that the primary of the system is a slow rotator (vsin i =29 +43/-29 km/s), while the secondary rotates significantly faster, at a vsin i =230+/-45 km/s. We show that the close companion to the beta Cep primary is a valid classical Be star. It has a spectral type of B5Ve and is a relatively fast rotator.
  • Massive young stellar objects (MYSO) are surrounded by massive dusty envelopes. Our aim is to establish their density structure on scales of ~1000 AU, i.e. a factor 10 increase in angular resolution compared to similar studies performed in the (sub)mm. We have obtained diffraction-limited (0.6") 24.5 micron images of 14 well-known massive star formation regions with Subaru/COMICS. The images reveal the presence of discrete MYSO sources which are resolved on arcsecond scales. For many sources, radiative transfer models are capable of satisfactorily reproducing the observations. They are described by density powerlaw distributions (n(r) ~ r^(-p)) with p = 1.0 +/-0.25. Such distributions are shallower than those found on larger scales probed with single-dish (sub)mm studies. Other sources have density laws that are shallower/steeper than p = 1.0 and there is evidence that these MYSOs are viewed near edge-on or near face-on, respectively. The images also reveal a diffuse component tracing somewhat larger scale structures, particularly visible in the regions S140, AFGL 2136, IRAS 20126+4104, Mon R2, and Cep A. We thus find a flattening of the MYSO envelope density law going from ~10 000 AU down to scales of ~1000 AU. We propose that this may be evidence of rotational support of the envelope (abridged).
  • We present diffraction limited (0.6") 24.5micron Subaru/COMICS images of the red supergiant mu Cep. We report the detection of a circumstellar nebula, that was not detected at shorter wavelengths. It extends to a radius of at least 6" in the thermal infrared. On these angular scales, the nebula is roughly spherical, in contrast, it displays a pronounced asymmetric morphology closer in. We simultaneously model the azimuthally averaged intensity profile of the nebula and the observed spectral energy distribution using spherical dust radiative transfer models. The models indicate a constant mass-loss process over the past 1000 years, for mass-loss rates a few times 10^(-7) Msun/yr. This work supports the idea that at least part of the asymmetries in shells of evolved massive stars and supernovae may be due to the mass-loss process in the red supergiant phase.