• Current models of antineutrino production in nuclear reactors predict detection rates and spectra at odds with the existing body of direct reactor antineutrino measurements. High-resolution antineutrino detectors operated close to compact research reactor cores can produce new precision measurements useful in testing explanations for these observed discrepancies involving underlying nuclear or new physics. Absolute measurement of the 235U-produced antineutrino spectrum can provide additional constraints for evaluating the accuracy of current and future reactor models, while relative measurements of spectral distortion between differing baselines can be used to search for oscillations arising from the existence of eV-scale sterile neutrinos. Such a measurement can be performed in the United States at several highly-enriched uranium fueled research reactors using near-surface segmented liquid scintillator detectors. We describe here the conceptual design and physics potential of the PROSPECT experiment, a U.S.-based, multi-phase experiment with reactor-detector baselines of 7-20 meters capable of addressing these and other physics and detector development goals. Current R&D status and future plans for PROSPECT detector deployment and data-taking at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be discussed.
  • With six recorded nova outbursts, the prototypical recurrent nova T Pyxidis is the ideal cataclysmic variable system to assess the net change of the white dwarf mass within a nova cycle. Recent estimates of the mass ejected in the 2011 outburst ranged from a few 1.E-5 sollar mass to 3.3E-4 sollar mass, and assuming a mass accretion rate of 1.E-8 to 1.E-7 Sollar mass/yr for 44yrs, it has been concluded that the white dwaf in T Pyx is actually losing mass. Using NLTE disk modeling spectra to fit our recently obtained Hubble Space Telescope (HST) COS and STIS spectra, we find a mass accretion rate of up to two orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Our larger mass accretion rate is due mainly to the newly derived distance of T Pyx (4.8kpc; Sokoloski et al. 2013, larger than the previous 3.5kpc estimate), our derived reddening of E(B-V)=0.35 (based on combined IUE and GALEX spectra) and NLTE disk modeling (compared to black body and raw flux estimates in earlier works). We find that for most values of the reddening (0.25 < E(B-V) < 0.50) and white dwaf mass (0.70 to 1.35 Sollar mass) the accreted mass is larger than the ejected mass. Only for a low reddening (0.25 and smaller) combined with a large white dwaf mass (0.9 sollar mass and larger) is the ejected mass larger than the accreted one. However, the best spectral fitting results are obtained for a larger value of the reddening.
  • We report optical photometry and optical through mid-infrared spectroscopy of the classical nova V1186 Sco. This slowly developing nova had an complex light curve with multiple secondary peaks similar to those seen in PW Vul. The time to decline 2 magnitudes, t$_2$, was 20 days but the erratic nature of the light curve makes determination of intrinsic properties based on the decline time (e.g., luminosity) problematic, and the often cited MMRD relationship of Della Valle and Livio (1995) fails to yield a plausible distance. Spectra covering 0.35 to 35 $\mu$m were obtained in two separate epochs during the first year of outburst. The first set of spectra, taken about 2 months after visible maximum, are typical of a CO-type nova with narrow line emission from \ion{H}{1}, \ion{Fe}{2}, \ion{O}{1} and \ion{He}{1}. Later data, obtained between 260 and 380 days after maximum, reveal an emerging nebular spectrum. \textit{Spitzer} spectra show weakening hydrogen recombination emission with the emergence of [\ion{Ne}{2}] (12.81 $\mu$m) as the strongest line. Strong emission from [\ion{Ne}{3}] (15.56 $\mu$m) is also detected. Photoionization models with low effective temperature sources and only marginal neon enhancement (Ne $\sim$ 1.3 Ne$_{\odot}$) are consistent with these IR fine-structure neon lines indicating that V1186 Sco did not occur on a ONeMg white dwarf. In contrast, the slow and erratic light curve evolution, spectral development, and photoionization analysis of the ejecta imply the outburst occurred on a low mass CO white dwarf. We note that this is the first time strong [\ion{Ne}{2}] lines have been detected so early in the outburst of a CO nova and suggests that the presence of mid-infrared neon lines is not directly indicative of a ONeMg nova event.
  • We present the first results from a series of radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field South and its flanking fields. Here we consider only those sources greater than 100 microJy at 20 cm, in an 8-arcmin square field that covers the WFPC field, the STIS and NICMOS field, and most of the HST flanking fields and complementary ground-based observations. We have detected 13 such radio sources, two of which are in the WFPC2 field itself. One of the sources in the WFPC field (source c) corresponds to a very faint galaxy, and several others outside the WFPC field can not be identified with sources in the other optical/IR wavebands. The radio and optical luminosities of these galaxies are inconsistent with either conventional starburst galaxies or with radio-loud galaxies. Instead, it appears that it belongs to a population of galaxies which are rare in the local Universe, possibly consisting of a radio-luminous active nucleus embedded in a very dusty starburst galaxy, and which are characterised by a very high radio/optical luminosity ratio.
  • We report the serendipitous discovery of an extremely red object in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) Test NICMOS (Near Infrared Camera and Multi Object Spectrograph) field of view. The object is resolved in the NICMOS image and has a light profile very well described by an r^{1/4} law with effective radius r_e=0."20+-0."05 and H_{AB}=21.7+-0.1 magnitudes. In contrast, the galaxy is undetected in the R and I band ground based images taken at the CTIO 4 m Blanco Telescope, giving a lower limit to the color of (R-H)_{AB}>3.9 and (I-H)_{AB}>3.5 at the 95% confidence level. The colors of a range of synthetic galactic spectra are computed, showing that the object is likely to be an ``old'' elliptical galaxy at redshift z>~1.7. Alternatively the colors can be reproduced by an ``old'' elliptical galaxy at somewhat lower redshift (z>~1) with significant amount of dust, or by a younger galaxy at higher redshift. This object represents a very interesting target for future VLT observations.