• We have selected a sample of eleven massive clusters of galaxies observed by the Hubble Space Telescope in order to study the impact of the dynamical state on the IntraCluster Light (ICL) fraction, the ratio of total integrated ICL to the total galaxy member light. With the exception of the Bullet cluster, the sample is drawn from the Cluster Lensing and Supernova Survey and the Frontier Fields program, containing five relaxed and six merging clusters. The ICL fraction is calculated in three optical filters using the CHEFs IntraCluster Light Estimator, a robust and accurate algorithm free of a priori assumptions. We find that the ICL fraction in the three bands is, on average, higher for the merging clusters, ranging between $\sim7-23\%$, compared with the $\sim 2-11\%$ found for the relaxed systems. We observe a nearly constant value (within the error bars) in the ICL fraction of the regular clusters at the three wavelengths considered, which would indicate that the colors of the ICL and the cluster galaxies are, on average, coincident and, thus, their stellar populations. However, we find a higher ICL fraction in the F606W filter for the merging clusters, consistent with an excess of lower-metallicity/younger stars in the ICL, which could have migrated violently from the outskirts of the infalling galaxies during the merger event.
  • We use the largest sample of z~6 galaxies to date from the first four Hubble Frontier Fields clusters to set constraints on the shape of the z~6 luminosity functions (LFs) to fainter than Muv=-14 mag. We quantify, for the first time, the impact of magnification uncertainties on LF results and thus provide more realistic constraints than other recent work. Our simulations reveal that for the highly-magnified sources the systematic uncertainties can become extremely large fainter than -14 mag, reaching several orders of magnitude at 95% confidence at ~-12 mag. Our new forward-modeling formalism incorporates the impact of magnification uncertainties into the LF results by exploiting the availability of many independent magnification models for the same cluster. One public magnification model is used to construct a mock high-redshift galaxy sample that is then analyzed using the other magnification models to construct a LF. Large systematic errors occur at high magnifications (mu>30) because of differences between the models. The volume densities we derive for faint (>-17 mag) sources are ~3-4x lower than one recent report and give a faint-end slope alpha=-1.92+/-0.04, which is 3.0-3.5sigma shallower (including or not including the size uncertainties, respectively). We introduce a new curvature parameter delta to model the faint end of the LF and demonstrate that the observations permit (at 68% confidence) a turn-over at z~6 in the range -15.3 to -14.2 mag, depending on the assumed lensing model. The present consideration of magnification errors and new size determinations raise doubts about previous reports regarding the form of the LF at >-14 mag. We discuss the implications of our turn-over constraints in the context of recent theoretical predictions.
  • We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. Yet, we cannot really assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first such size constraints with 2 new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly-magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy's size. Only the most compact galaxies will remain detectable in regions of high shear (vs. a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we carefully quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 faint high-magnification mu>10 z~2-8 galaxies seen behind the first 4 HFF clusters. This can only be the case if such faint (~-15 mag) galaxies have significantly smaller sizes than luminous galaxies. We constrain their half-light radii to be <~30 mas (<160-240 pc). As a 2nd size probe, we rotate and stack 26 faint high-magnification sources along the major shear axis. Less elongation is found than even for objects with an intrinsic half-light radius of 10 mas. Together these results indicate that extremely faint z~2-8 galaxies have near point-source profiles in the HFF dataset (half-light radii conservatively <30 mas and likely 5-10 mas). These results suggest smaller completeness corrections and hence much lower volume densities for faint z~2-8 galaxies and shallower faint-end slopes than have been derived in many recent studies (by factors of ~2-3 and by dalpha>~0.1-0.3).
  • Galaxies represent one of the preferred candidate sources to drive the reionization of the universe. Even as gains are made in mapping the galaxy UV luminosity density to z>6, significant uncertainties remain regarding the conversion to the implied ionizing emissivity. The relevant unknowns are the Lyman-continuum (LyC) photon production efficiency xi_{ion} and the escape fraction f_{esc}. As we show here, the first of these unknowns is directly measureable in z=4-5 galaxies, based on the impact the Halpha line has on the observed IRAC fluxes. By computing a LyC photon production rate from the implied Halpha luminosities for a broad selection of z=4-5 galaxies and comparing this against the dust-corrected UV-continuum luminosities, we provide the first-ever direct estimates of the LyC photon production efficiency xi_{ion} for the z>~4 galaxy population. We find log_{10} xi_{ion}/[Hz/ergs] to have a mean value of 25.27_{-0.03}^{+0.03} and 25.34_{-0.02}^{+0.02} for sub-L* z=4-5 galaxies adopting Calzetti and SMC dust laws, respectively. Reassuringly, both values are consistent with standardly assumed xi_{ion}'s in reionization models, with a slight preference for higher xi_{ion}'s (by ~0.1 dex) adopting the SMC dust law. A modest ~0.03-dex increase in these estimates would result if the escape fraction for ionizing photons is non-zero and galaxies dominate the ionizing emissivity at z~4.4. High values of xi_{ion} (~25.5-25.8 dex) are derived for the bluest galaxies (beta<-2.3) in our samples, independent of dust law and consistent with results for a z=7.045 galaxy. Such elevated values of xi_{ion} would have important consequences, indicating that f_{esc} cannot be in excess of 13% unless the galaxy UV luminosity function does not extend down to -13 mag or the clumping factor is greater than 3. A low escape fraction would fit well with the low rate of LyC leakage observed at z~3.
  • Searches for very-high-redshift galaxies over the past decade have yielded a large sample of more than 6,000 galaxies existing just 900-2,000 million years (Myr) after the Big Bang (redshifts 6 > z > 3; ref. 1). The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF09) data have yielded the first reliable detections of z ~ 8 galaxies that, together with reports of a gamma-ray burst at z ~ 8.2 (refs 10, 11), constitute the earliest objects reliably reported to date. Observations of z ~ 7-8 galaxies suggest substantial star formation at z > 9-10. Here we use the full two-year HUDF09 data to conduct an ultra-deep search for z ~ 10 galaxies in the heart of the reionization epoch, only 500 Myr after the Big Bang. Not only do we find one possible z ~ 10 galaxy candidate, but we show that, regardless of source detections, the star formation rate density is much smaller (~10%) at this time than it is just ~200 Myr later at z ~ 8. This demonstrates how rapid galaxy build-up was at z ~ 10, as galaxies increased in both luminosity density and volume density from z ~ 8 to z ~ 10. The 100-200 Myr before z ~ 10 is clearly a crucial phase in the assembly of the earliest galaxies.
  • We present the first results on the search for very bright (M_AB -21) galaxies at redshift z~8 from the Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey. BoRG is a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 pure-parallel survey that is obtaining images on random lines of sight at high Galactic latitudes in four filters (F606W, F098M, F125W, F160W), with integration times optimized to identify galaxies at z>7.5 as F098M-dropouts. We discuss here results from a search area of approximately 130 arcmin^2 over 23 BoRG fields, complemented by six other pure-parallel WFC3 fields with similar filters. This new search area is more than two times wider than previous WFC3 observations at z~8. We identify four F098M-dropout candidates with high statistical confidence (detected at greater than 8sigma confidence in F125W). These sources are among the brightest candidates currently known at z~8 and approximately ten times brighter than the z=8.56 galaxy UDFy-38135539. They thus represent ideal targets for spectroscopic followup observations and could potentially lead to a redshift record, as our color selection includes objects up to z~9. However, the expected contamination rate of our sample is about 30% higher than typical searches for dropout galaxies in legacy fields, such as the GOODS and HUDF, where deeper data and additional optical filters are available to reject contaminants.
  • We present the details and early results from a deep near-infrared survey utilising the NICMOS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope centred around massive M_* > 10^11 M_0 galaxies at 1.7 < z < 2.9 found within the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. The GOODS NICMOS Survey (GNS) was designed to obtain deep F160W (H-band) imaging of 80 of these massive galaxies, as well as other colour selected objects such as Lyman-break drop-outs, BzK objects, Distant Red Galaxies, EROs, Spitzer Selected EROs, BX/BM galaxies, as well as sub-mm galaxies. We present in this paper details of the observations, our sample selection, as well as a description of features of the massive galaxies found within our survey fields. This includes: photometric redshifts, rest-frame colours, and stellar masses. We furthermore provide an analysis of the selection methods for finding massive galaxies at high redshifts, including colour selection, and how galaxy populations selected through different methods overlap. We find that a single colour selection method cannot locate all of the massive galaxies, with no one method finding more than 70 percent. We however find that the combination of these colour methods finds nearly all the massive galaxies, as selected by photometric redshifts with the exception of apparently rare blue massive galaxies. By investigating the rest-frame (U-B) vs. M_B diagram for these galaxies we furthermore show that there exists a bimodality in colour-magnitude space at z < 2, driven by stellar mass, such that the most massive galaxies are systematically red up to z~2.5, while lower mass galaxies tend to be blue. We also discuss the number densities for galaxies with stellar masses M_* > 10^11 M_0, whereby we find an increase of a factor of eight between z = 3 and z = 1.5, demonstrating that this is an epoch when massive galaxies establish most of their mass.
  • The new Wide Field Camera 3/IR observations on the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field started investigating the properties of galaxies during the reionization epoch. To interpret these observations, we present a novel approach inspired by the conditional luminosity function method. We calibrate our model to observations at z=6 and assume a non-evolving galaxy luminosity versus halo mass relation. We first compare model predictions against the luminosity function measured at z=5 and z=4. We then predict the luminosity function at z>=7 under the sole assumption of evolution in the underlying dark-matter halo mass function. Our model is consistent with the observed z>6.5 galaxy number counts in the HUDF survey and suggests a possible steepening of the faint-end slope of the luminosity function: alpha(z>8)< -1.9 compared to alpha=-1.74 at z=6. Although we currently see only the brightest galaxies, a hidden population of lower luminosity objects (L/L_{*}> 10^{-4}) might provide >75% of the total reionizing flux. Assuming escape fraction f_{esc}~0.2, clumping factor C~5, top heavy-IMF and low metallicity, galaxies below the detection limit produce complete reionization at z>8. For solar metallicity and normal stellar IMF, reionization finishes at z>6, but a smaller C/f_{esc} is required for an optical depth consistent with the WMAP measurement. Our model highlights that the star formation rate in sub-L_* galaxies has a quasi-linear relation to dark-matter halo mass, suggesting that radiative and mechanical feedback were less effective at z>6 than today.
  • We use the ultra-deep WFC3/IR data over the HUDF and the Early Release Science WFC3/IR data over the CDF-South GOODS field to quantify the broadband spectral properties of candidate star-forming galaxies at z~7. We determine the UV-continuum slope beta in these galaxies, and compare the slopes with galaxies at later times to measure the evolution in beta. For luminous L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean UV-continuum slope beta of -2.0+/-0.2, which is comparable to the beta~-2 derived at similar luminosities at z~5-6. However, for the lower luminosity 0.1L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean beta of -3.0+/-0.2. This is substantially bluer than is found for similar luminosity galaxies at z~4, just 800 Myr later, and even at z~5-6. In principle, the observed beta of -3.0 can be matched by a very young, dust-free stellar population, but when nebular emission is included the expected beta becomes >~-2.7. To produce these very blue beta's (i.e., beta~-3), extremely low metallicities and mechanisms to reduce the red nebular emission are likely required. For example, a large escape fraction (i.e., f_{esc}>~0.3) could minimize the contribution from this red nebular emission. If this is correct and the escape fraction in faint z~7 galaxies is >~0.3, it may help to explain how galaxies reionize the universe.
  • We utilize the newly-acquired, ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations over the HUDF to search for star-forming galaxies at z~8-8.5, only 600 million years from recombination, using a Y_{105}-dropout selection. The new 4.7 arcmin**2 WFC3/IR observations reach to ~28.8 AB mag (5 sigma) in the Y_{105}J_{125}H_{160} bands. These remarkable data reach ~1.5 AB mag deeper than the previous data over the HUDF, and now are an excellent match to the HUDF optical ACS data. For our search criteria, we use a two-color Lyman-Break selection technique to identify z~8-8.5 Y_{105}-dropouts. We find 5 likely z~8-8.5 candidates. The sources have H_{160}-band magnitudes of ~28.3 AB mag and very blue UV-continuum slopes, with a median estimated beta of <~-2.5 (where f_{\lambda}\propto \lambda^{\beta}). This suggests that z~8 galaxies are not only essentially dust free but also may have very young ages or low metallicities. The observed number of Y_{105}-dropout candidates is smaller than the 20+/-6 sources expected assuming no evolution from z~6, but is consistent with the 5 expected extrapolating the Bouwens et al. 2008 LF results to z~8. These results provide evidence that the evolution in the LF seen from z~7 to z~3 continues to z~8. The remarkable improvement in the sensitivity of WFC3/IR has enabled HST to cross a threshold, revealing star-forming galaxies at z~8-9.
  • We present a first morphological study of z~7-8 Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs) from Oesch et al. 2009 and Bouwens et al. 2009 detected in ultra-deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep field (HUDF) by the HUDF09 program. With an average intrinsic size of 0.7+-0.3 kpc these galaxies are found to be extremely compact having an average observed surface brightness of mu_J ~= 26 mag arcsec^(-2), and only two out of the full sample of 16 z~7 galaxies show extended features with resolved double cores. By comparison to lower redshift LBGs it is found that only little size evolution takes place from z~7 to z~6, while galaxies between z~4-5 show more extended wings in their apparent profiles. The average size scales as (1+z)^(-m) with m=1.12+-0.17 for galaxies with luminosities in the range (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} and with m=1.32+-0.52 for (0.12-0.3)L*_{z=3}, consistent with galaxies having constant comoving sizes. The peak of the size distribution changes only slowly from z~7 to z~4. However, a tail of larger galaxies (>~ 1.2 kpc) is gradually built up towards later cosmic times, possibly via hierarchical build-up or via enhanced accretion of cold gas. Additionally, the average star-formation surface density of LBGs with luminosities (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} is nearly constant at Sigma_{SFR}=1.9 Msun/yr/kpc^2 over the entire redshift range z~4-7 suggesting similar star-formation efficiencies at these early epochs. The above evolutionary trends seem to hold out to z~8 though the sample is still small and possibly incomplete.
  • We provide a systematic measurement of the rest-frame UV continuum slope beta over a wide range in redshift (z~2-6) and rest-frame UV luminosity (0.1-2L*) to improve estimates of the SFR density at high redshift. We utilize the deep optical and infrared data (ACS/NICMOS) over the CDF-S and HDF-N GOODS fields, as well as the UDF for our primary UBVi "dropout" sample. We correct the observed distributions for selection biases and photometric scatter. We find that the UV-continuum slope of the most luminous galaxies is substantially redder at z~2-4 than it is at z~5-6. Lower luminosity galaxies are also found to be bluer than higher luminosity galaxies at z~2.5 and z~4. We do not find a large number of galaxies with beta's as red as -1 in our dropout selections at z~4, and particularly at z>~5, even though such sources could be readily selected from our data. This suggests that star-forming galaxies at z>~5 almost universally have very blue UV-continuum slopes, and that there are not likely to be a substantial number of dust-obscured galaxies at z>~5 that are missed in "dropout" searches. Using the same relation between UV-continuum slope and dust extinction as found to be appropriate at z~0 and z~2, we estimate the average dust extinction of galaxies as a function of redshift and UV luminosity in a consistent way. We find that the estimated dust extinction increases substantially with cosmic time for the most UV luminous galaxies, but remains small (<~2x) at all times for lower luminosity galaxies. Because these same lower luminosity galaxies dominate the luminosity density in the UV, the overall dust extinction correction remains modest at all redshifts. We include the contribution from ULIRGs in our SFR density estimates at z~2-6, but find that they contribute only ~20% of the total at z~2.5 and <~10% at z>~4.
  • We have detected 506 i-dropouts (z~6 galaxies) in deep, wide-area HST ACS fields: HUDF, enhanced GOODS, and HUDF-Parallel ACS fields (HUDF-Ps). The contamination levels are <=8% (i.e., >=92% are at z~6). With these samples, we present the most comprehensive, quantitative analyses of z~6 galaxies yet and provide optimal measures of the UV luminosity function (LF) and luminosity density at z~6, and their evolution to z~3. We redetermine the size and color evolution from z~6 to z~3. Field-to-field variations (cosmic variance), completeness, flux, and contamination corrections are modelled systematically and quantitatively. After corrections, we derive a rest-frame continuum UV (~1350 A) LF at z~6 that extends to M_{1350,AB} ~ -17.5 (0.04L*(z=3)). There is strong evidence for evolution of the LF between z~6 and z~3, most likely through a brightening (0.6+/-0.2 mag) of M* (at 99.7% confidence) though the degree depends upon the faint-end slope. As expected from hierarchical models, the most luminous galaxies are deficient at z~6. Density evolution (phi*) is ruled out at >99.99% confidence. Despite large changes in the LF, the luminosity density at z~6 is similar (0.82+/-0.21x) to that at z~3. Changes in the mean UV color of galaxies from z~6 to z~3 suggest an evolution in dust content, indicating the true evolution is substantially larger: at z~6 the star formation rate density is just ~30% of the z~3 value. Our UV luminosity function is consistent with z~6 galaxies providing the necessary UV flux to reionize the universe.
  • We present deep HST/ACS observations in g,r,i,z towards the z=4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942 and its overdensity of >30 spectroscopically confirmed Lya emitters (LAEs). We select 66 g-band dropouts to z=27, 6 of which are also a LAE. Although our color-color selection results in a relatively broad redshift range centered on z=4.1, the field of TN J1338-1942 is richer than the average field at the >5 sigma significance, based on a comparison with GOODS. The angular distribution is filamentary with about half of the objects clustered near the radio galaxy, and a small, excess signal (2 sigma) in the projected pair counts at separations of <10" is interpreted as being due to physical pairs. The LAEs are young (a few x 10^7 yr), small (<r_50> = 0.13") galaxies, and we derive a mean stellar mass of ~10^8-9 Msun based on a stacked K-band image. We determine star formation rates, sizes, morphologies, and color-magnitude relations of the g-dropouts and find no evidence for a difference between galaxies near TN J1338-1942 and in the field. We conclude that environmental trends as observed in clusters at much lower redshift are either not yet present, or are washed out by the relatively broad selection in redshift. The large galaxy overdensity, its corresponding mass overdensity and the sub-clustering at the approximate redshift of TN J1338-1942 suggest the assemblage of a >10^14 Msun structure, confirming that it is possible to find and study cluster progenitors in the linear regime at z>4.
  • We present a comprehensive mass reconstruction of the rich galaxy cluster Cl 0024+17 at z~0.4 from ACS data, unifying both strong- and weak-lensing constraints. The weak-lensing signal from a dense distribution of background galaxies (~120 per square arcmin) across the cluster enables the derivation of a high-resolution parameter-free mass map. The strongly-lensed objects tightly constrain the mass structure of the cluster inner region on an absolute scale, breaking the mass-sheet degeneracy. The mass reconstruction of Cl 0024+17 obtained in such a way is remarkable. It reveals a ringlike dark matter substructure at r~75" surrounding a soft, dense core at r~50". We interpret this peculiar sub-structure as the result of a high-speed line-of-sight collision of two massive clusters 1-2 Gyr ago. Such an event is also indicated by the cluster velocity distribution. Our numerical simulation with purely collisionless particles demonstrates that such density ripples can arise by radially expanding, decelerating particles that originally comprised the pre-collision cores. Cl 0024+17 can be likened to the bullet cluster 1E0657-56, but viewed $along$ the collision axis at a much later epoch. In addition, we show that the long-standing mass discrepancy for Cl 0024+17 between X-ray and lensing can be resolved by treating the cluster X-ray emission as coming from a superposition of two X-ray systems. The cluster's unusual X-ray surface brightness profile that requires a two isothermal sphere description supports this hypothesis.
  • We study the photometric and structural properties of spectroscopically confirmed members in the two massive X-ray--selected z=0.83 galaxy clusters MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357 using three-band mosaic imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys. The samples include 105 and 140 members of MS1054-03 and RXJ0152-1357, respectively, with ACS F775W magnitude < 24.0. We develop a promising new structural classification method, based on a combination of the best-fit Sersic indices and the normalized root-mean-square residuals from the fits; the resulting classes agree well with the visual ones, but are less affected by galaxy orientation. We examine the color--magnitude relations in detail and find that the color residuals correlate with the local mass density measured from our weak lensing maps; we identify a threshold density of $\Sigma \approx 0.1$, in units of the critical density, above which the star formation appears to cease. For RXJ0152-1357, we also find a trend in the color residuals with velocity, resulting from an offset of about 980 km/s in the mean redshifts of the early- and late-type galaxies. Analysis of the color--color diagrams indicates that a range of star formation time-scales are needed to reproduce the loci of the galaxy colors. We also identify some cluster galaxies whose colors can only be explained by large amounts, $A_V \approx 1$ mag, of internal dust extinction. [Abstract shortened]
  • We present HST/ACS observations of the most distant radio galaxy known, TN J0924-2201 at z=5.2. This radio galaxy has 6 spectroscopically confirmed Lya emitting companion galaxies, and appears to lie within an overdense region. The radio galaxy is marginally resolved in i_775 and z_850 showing continuum emission aligned with the radio axis, similar to what is observed for lower redshift radio galaxies. Both the half-light radius and the UV star formation rate are comparable to the typical values found for Lyman break galaxies at z~4-5. The Lya emitters are sub-L* galaxies, with deduced star formation rates of 1-10 Msun/yr. One of the Lya emitters is only detected in Lya. Based on the star formation rate of ~3 Msun/yr calculated from Lya, the lack of continuum emission could be explained if the galaxy is younger than ~2 Myr and is producing its first stars. Observations in V_606, i_775, and z_850 were used to identify additional Lyman break galaxies associated with this structure. In addition to the radio galaxy, there are 22 V-break (z~5) galaxies with z_850<26.5 (5sigma), two of which are also in the spectroscopic sample. We compare the surface density of 2/arcmin^2 to that of similarly selected V-dropouts extracted from GOODS and the UDF Parallel fields. We find evidence for an overdensity to very high confidence (>99%), based on a counts-in-cells analysis applied to the control field. The excess is suggestive of the V-break objects being associated with a forming cluster around the radio galaxy.
  • We have obtained a high S/N (22.3 hr integration) UV continuum VLT FORS2 spectrum of an extremely bright (z_850 = 24.3) z = 5.515 +/- 0.003 starforming galaxy (BD38) in the field of the z = 1.24 cluster RDCS 1252.9-2927. This object shows substantial continuum (0.41 +/- 0.02 \muJy at \lambda1300) and low-ionization interstellar absorption features typical of LBGs at lower redshift (z ~ 3); this is the highest redshift LBG confirmed via metal absorption spectral features. The equivalent widths of the absorption features are similar to z ~ 3 strong Ly\alpha absorbers. No noticeable Ly\alpha emission was detected (F <= 1.4 * 10^-18 ergs cm^-2 s^-1, 3\sigma). The half-light radius of this object is 1.6 kpc (0\farcs25) and the star formation rate derived from the rest-frame UV luminosity is SFR_UV = 38 h^-2_0.7 M_sun yr^-1 (142 h^-2_0.7 M_sun yr^-1 corrected for dust extinction). In terms of recent determinations of the z ~ 6 UV luminosity function, this object appears to be 6L*. The Spitzer IRAC fluxes for this object are 23.3 and 23.2 AB mag (corrected for 0.3 mag of cluster lensing) in the 3.6\mu and 4.5\mu channels, respectively, implying a mass of 1-6 * 10^10 M_sun from population synthesis models. This galaxy is brighter than any confirmed z ~ 6 i-dropout to date in the z_850 band, and both the 3.6\mu and 4.5\mu channels, and is the most massive starbursting galaxy known at z > 5. -- Abstract Abridged
  • We present new measurements of the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and its dependence on local galaxy density, color, morphology, and clustocentric radius for the massive z=0.83 cluster MS1054-0321. Our analyses are based on imaging performed with the ACS onboard the HST in the F606W, F775W and F850LP passbands and extensive spectroscopic data obtained with the Keck LRIS. Our main results are based on a spectroscopically selected sample of 143 cluster members with morphological classifications derived from the ACS observations. Our three primary findings are (1) the faint-end slope of the LF is steepest in the bluest filter, (2) the LF in the inner part of the cluster (or highest density regions) has a flatter faint-end slope, and (3) the fraction of early-type galaxies is higher at the bright end of the LF, and gradually decreases toward fainter magnitudes. These characteristics are consistent with those in local galaxy clusters, indicating that, at least in massive clusters, the common characteristics of cluster LFs are established at z=0.83. We also find a 2sigma deficit of intrinsically faint, red galaxies (i-z>0.5, Mi>-19) in this cluster. This trend may suggest that faint, red galaxies (which are common in z<0.1 rich clusters) have not yet been created in this cluster at z=0.83. The giant-to-dwarf ratio in MS1054-0321 starts to increase inwards of the virial radius or when Sigma>30 Mpc^-2, coinciding with the environment where the galaxy star formation rate and the morphology-density relation start to appear. (abridged)
  • We combine imaging data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) with VLT/FORS optical spectroscopy to study the properties of star-forming galaxies in the z=0.837 cluster CL0152-1357. We have morphological information for 24 star-forming cluster galaxies, which range in morphology from late-type and irregular to compact early-type galaxies. We find that while most star-forming galaxies have $r_{625}-i_{775}$ colors bluer than 1.0, eight are in the red cluster sequence. Among the star-forming cluster population we find five compact early-type galaxies which have properties consistent with their identification as progenitors of dwarf elliptical galaxies. The spatial distribution of the star-forming cluster members is nonuniform. We find none within $R\sim 500$ Mpc of the cluster center, which is highly suggestive of an intracluster medium interaction. We derive star formation rates from [OII] $\lambda\lambda 3727$ line fluxes, and use these to compare the global star formation rate of CL0152-1357 to other clusters at low and intermediate redshifts. We find a tentative correlation between integrated star formation rates and $T_{X}$, in the sense that hotter clusters have lower integrated star formation rates. Additional data from clusters with low X-ray temperatures is needed to confirm this trend. We do not find a significant correlation with redshift, suggesting that evolution is either weak or absent between z=0.2-0.8.
  • We use the exceptional depth of the Ultra Deep Field (UDF) and UDF-Parallel ACS fields to study the sizes of high redshift (z~2-6) galaxies and address long-standing questions about possible biases in the cosmic star formation rate due to surface brightness dimming. Contrasting B, V, and i-dropout samples culled from the deeper data with those obtained from the shallower GOODS fields, we demonstrate that the shallower data are essentially complete at bright magnitudes to z<5.5 and that the principal effect of depth is to add objects at the magnitude limit. This indicates that high redshift galaxies are compact in size (~0.1-0.3") and that large (>0.4", >3 kpc) low surface brightness galaxies are rare. A simple comparison of the half-light radii of the HDF-N + HDF-S U-dropouts with B, V, and i-dropouts from the UDF shows that the sizes follow a (1+z)^{-1.05+/-0.21} scaling towards high redshift. A more rigorous measurement compares different scalings of our U-dropout sample with the mean profiles for a set of intermediate magnitude (26.0<z_{850,AB}<27.5) i-dropouts from the UDF. The best-fit is found with a (1+z)^{-0.94_{-0.25} ^{+0.19}} size scaling (for fixed luminosity). This result is then verified by repeating this experiment with different size measures, low redshift samples, and magnitude ranges. Very similar scalings are found for all comparisons. A robust measurement of size evolution is thereby demonstrated for galaxies from z~6 to z~2.5 using data from the UDF.
  • The properties of Ultra Compact Dwarf (UCD) galaxy candidates in Abell 1689 (z=0.183) are investigated, based on deep high resolution ACS images. A UCD candidate has to be unresolved, have i<28 (M_V<-11.5) mag and satisfy color limits derived from Bayesian photometric redshifts. We find 160 UCD candidates with 22<i<28 mag. It is estimated that about 100 of these are cluster members, based on their spatial distribution and photometric redshifts. For i>26.8 mag, the radial and luminosity distribution of the UCD candidates can be explained well by Abell 1689's globular cluster (GC) system. For i<26.8 mag, there is an overpopulation of 15 +/- 5 UCD candidates with respect to the GC luminosity function. For i<26 mag, the radial distribution of UCD candidates is more consistent with the dwarf galaxy population than with the GC system of Abell 1689. The UCD candidates follow a color-magnitude trend with a slope similar to that of Abell 1689's genuine dwarf galaxy population, but shifted fainter by about 2-3 mag. Two of the three brightest UCD candidates (M_V ~ -17 mag) are slightly resolved. At the distance of Abell 1689, these two objects would have King-profile core radii of ~35 pc and r_eff ~300 pc, implying luminosities and sizes 2-3 times those of M32's bulge. Additional photometric redshifts obtained with late type stellar and elliptical galaxy templates support the assignment of these two resolved sources to Abell 1689. Our findings imply that in Abell 1689 there are at least 10 UCDs with M_V<-12.7 mag. Compared to the UCDs in the Fornax cluster they are brighter, larger and have colors closer to normal dwarf galaxies. This suggests that they may be in an intermediate stage of the stripping process. Spectroscopy is needed to definitely confirm the existence of UCDs in Abell 1689.
  • (Abridged) We study the internal color properties of a morphologically selected sample of spheroidal galaxies taken from HST/ACS ERO program of UGC 10214 (``The Tadpole''). By taking advantage of the unprecedented high resolution of the ACS in this very deep dataset we are able to characterize spheroids at sub-arcseconds scales. Using the V_606W and I_814W bands, we construct V-I color maps and extract color gradients for a sample of spheroids at I_814W < 24 mag. We investigate the existence of a population of morphologically classified spheroids which show extreme variation in their internal color properties similar to the ones reported in the HDFs. These are displayed as blue cores and inverse color gradients with respect to those accounted from metallicity variations. Following the same analysis we find a similar fraction of early-type systems (~30%-40%) that show non-homologous internal colors, suggestive of recent star formation activity. We present two statistics to quantify the internal color variation in galaxies and for tracing blue cores, from which we estimate the fraction of non-homogeneous to homogeneous internal colors as a function of redshift up to z<1.2. We find that it can be described as about constant as a function of redshift, with a small increase with redshift for the fraction of spheroids that present strong color dispersions. The implications of a constant fraction at all redshifts suggests the existence of a relatively permanent population of evolving spheroids up to z~1. We discuss the implications of this in the context of spheroidal formation.
  • We report on the i-dropouts detected in two exceptionally deep ACS fields (B_{435}, V_{606}, i_{775}, and z_{850} with 10 sigma limits of 28.8, 29.0, 28.5, and 27.8, respectively) taken in parallel with the UDF NICMOS observations. Using an i-z>1.4 cut, we find 30 i-dropouts over 21 arcmin^2 down to z_AB=28.1, or 1.4 i-dropouts arcmin^{-2}, with significant field-to-field variation (as expected from cosmic variance). This extends i-dropout searches some ~0.9^m further down the luminosity function than was possible in the GOODS field, netting a ~7x increase in surface density. An estimate of the size evolution for UV bright objects is obtained by comparing the composite radial flux profile of the bright i-dropouts (z<27.2) with scaled versions of the HDF-N + HDF-S U-dropouts. The best-fit is found with a (1+z)^{-1.57_{-0.53} ^{+0.50}} scaling in size (for fixed luminosity), extending lower redshift (1<z<5) trends to z~6. Adopting this scaling and the brighter i-dropouts from both GOODS fields, we make incompleteness estimates and construct a z~6 LF in the rest-frame continuum UV (~1350 A) over a 3.5 magnitude baseline, finding a shape consistent with that found at lower redshift. To evaluate the evolution in the LF from z~3.8, we make comparisons against different scalings of a lower redshift B-dropout sample. Though a strong degeneracy is found between luminosity and density evolution, our best-fit model scales as (1+z)^{-2.8} in number and (1+z)^0.1 in luminosity, suggesting a rest-frame continuum UV luminosity density at z~6 which is just 0.38_{-0.07} ^{+0.09}x that at z~3.8. Our inclusion of size evolution makes the present estimate lower than previous z~6 estimates.
  • We have discovered three globular clusters beyond the Holmberg radius in Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys images of the gas-rich dark matter dominated blue compact dwarf galaxy NGC2915. The clusters, all of which start to resolve into stars, have M_{V606} = -8.9 to -9.8 mag, significantly brighter than the peak of the luminosity function of Milky Way globular clusters. Their colors suggest a metallicity [Fe/H] ~ -1.9 dex, typical of metal-poor Galactic globular clusters. The specific frequency of clusters is at a minimum normal, compared to spiral galaxies. However, since only a small portion of the system has been surveyed it is more likely that the luminosity and mass normalized cluster content is higher, like that seen in elliptical galaxies and galaxy clusters. This suggests that NGC2915 resembles a key phase in the early hierarchical assembly of galaxies - the epoch when much of the old stellar population has formed, but little of the stellar disk. Depending on the subsequent interaction history, such systems could go on to build-up larger elliptical galaxies, evolve into normal spirals, or in rare circumstances remain suspended in their development to become systems like NGC2915.