• Na I D absorbing systems toward Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively studied over the last decade with the aim of finding circumstellar material (CSM), which is an indirect probe of the progenitor system. However, it is difficult to deconvolve CSM components from non-variable, and often dominant, components created by interstellar material (ISM). We present a series of high-resolution spectra of SN Ia 2014J from before maximum brightness to ~250 days after maximum brightness. The late-time spectrum provides unique information for determining the origin of the Na I D absorption systems. The deep late-time observation allows us to probe the environment around the SN at a large scale, extending to ~40 pc. We find that a spectrum of diffuse light in the vicinity, but not directly in the line-of-sight, of the SN has absorbing systems nearly identical to those obtained for the "pure" SN line-of-sight. Therefore, basically all Na I D systems seen toward SN 2014J must originate from foreground material that extends to at least ~40 pc in projection and none at the CSM scale. A fluctuation in the column densities at a scale of ~20 pc is also identified. After subtracting the diffuse, "background" spectrum, the late-time SN Na I D profile along the SN line-of-sight is consistent with the profile in the near-maximum brightness spectra. The lack of variability on a ~1 year timescale is consistent with the ISM interpretation for the gas.
  • We present a novel method for the light-curve characterization of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS) extragalactic sources into stochastic variables (SV) and burst-like (BL) transients, using multi-band image-differencing time-series data. We select detections in difference images associated with galaxy hosts using a star/galaxy catalog extracted from the deep PS1 MDS stacked images, and adopt a maximum a posteriori formulation to model their difference-flux time-series in four Pan-STARRS1 photometric bands g,r,i, and z. We use three deterministic light-curve models to fit burst-like transients and one stochastic light curve model, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, in order to fit variability that is characteristic of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We assess the quality of fit of the models band-wise source-wise, using their estimated leave-out-one cross-validation likelihoods and corrected Akaike information criteria. We then apply a K-means clustering algorithm on these statistics, to determine the source classification in each band. The final source classification is derived as a combination of the individual filter classifications. We use our clustering method to characterize 4361 extragalactic image difference detected sources in the first 2.5 years of the PS1 MDS, into 1529 BL, and 2262 SV, with a purity of 95.00% for AGN, and 90.97% for SN based on our verification sets. We combine our light-curve classifications with their nuclear or off-nuclear host galaxy offsets, to define a robust photometric sample of 1233 active galactic nuclei and 812 supernovae. We use these samples to identify simple photometric priors that would enable their real-time identification in future wide-field synoptic surveys.
  • We probe the systematic uncertainties from 113 Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) sample along with 197 SN Ia from a combination of low-redshift surveys. The companion paper by Rest et al. (2013) describes the photometric measurements and cosmological inferences from the PS1 sample. The largest systematic uncertainty stems from the photometric calibration of the PS1 and low-z samples. We increase the sample of observed Calspec standards from 7 to 10 used to define the PS1 calibration system. The PS1 and SDSS-II calibration systems are compared and discrepancies up to ~0.02 mag are recovered. We find uncertainties in the proper way to treat intrinsic colors and reddening produce differences in the recovered value of w up to 3%. We estimate masses of host galaxies of PS1 supernovae and detect an insignificant difference in distance residuals of the full sample of 0.037\pm0.031 mag for host galaxies with high and low masses. Assuming flatness in our analysis of only SNe measurements, we find $w = {-1.120^{+0.360}_{-0.206}\textrm{(Stat)} ^{+0.269}_{-0.291}\textrm{(Sys)}}$. With additional constraints from BAO, CMB(Planck) and H0 measurements, we find $w = -1.166^{+0.072}_{-0.069}$ and $\Omega_M=0.280^{+0.013}_{-0.012}$ (statistical and systematic errors added in quadrature). Significance of the inconsistency with $w=-1$ depends on whether we use Planck or WMAP measurements of the CMB: $w_{\textrm{BAO+H0+SN+WMAP}}=-1.124^{+0.083}_{-0.065}$.
  • Deep X-ray observations of the post-explosion environment around the very nearby Type Ia SN\,2014J (Dl=3.5 Mpc) reveal no X-ray emission down to a luminosity L<7x10^{36} erg/s (0.3-10 keV) at t~20 days after the explosion. We interpret this limit in the context of Inverse Compton emission from upscattered optical photons by the supernova shock and constrain the pre-explosion mass-loss rate of the stellar progenitor system to be <10^{-9} M_sun yr-1 (for wind velocity v_w=100 km/s). Alternatively, the SN shock might be expanding into a uniform medium with density $n_CSM<3 cm-3. These results rule out single-degenerate (SD) systems with steady mass-loss until the terminal explosion and constrain the fraction of transferred material lost at the outer Lagrangian point to be <1%. The allowed progenitors are (i) WD-WD progenitors, (ii) SD systems with unstable hydrogen burning experiencing recurrent nova eruptions with recurrence time t<300 yrs and (iii) stars where the mass loss ceases before the explosion.
  • The 2012 explosion of SN2009ip raises questions about our understanding of the late stages of massive star evolution. Here we present a comprehensive study of SN2009ip during its remarkable re-brightening(s). High-cadence photometric and spectroscopic observations from the GeV to the radio band obtained from a variety of ground-based and space facilities (including the VLA, Swift, Fermi, HST and XMM) constrain SN2009ip to be a low energy (E~ 10^50 erg for an ejecta mass ~ 0.5 Msun) and likely asymmetric explosion in a complex medium shaped by multiple eruptions of the restless progenitor star. Most of the energy is radiated as a result of the shock breaking out through a dense shell of material located at 5x10^14 cm with M~0.1 Msun, ejected by the precursor outburst ~40 days before the major explosion. We interpret the NIR excess of emission as signature of dust vaporization of material located further out (R>4x 10^15 cm), the origin of which has to be connected with documented mass loss episodes in the previous years. Our modeling predicts bright neutrino emission associated with the shock break-out if the cosmic ray energy is comparable to the radiated energy. We connect this phenomenology with the explosive ejection of the outer layers of the massive progenitor star, that later interacted with material deposited in the surroundings by previous eruptions. Future observations will reveal if the luminous blue variable (LBV) progenitor star survived. Irrespective of whether the explosion was terminal, SN2009ip brought to light the existence of new channels for sustained episodic mass-loss, the physical origin of which has yet to be identified.
  • We present a generalized analytic formalism for the inverse Compton X-ray emission from hydrogen-poor supernovae and apply this framework to SN2011fe using Swift-XRT, UVOT and Chandra observations. We characterize the optical properties of SN2011fe in the Swift bands and find them to be broadly consistent with a "normal" SN Ia, however, no X-ray source is detected by either XRT or Chandra. We constrain the progenitor system mass loss rate to be lower than 2x10^-9 M_sun/yr (3sigma c.l.) for wind velocity v_w=100 km/s. Our result rules out symbiotic binary progenitors for SN2011fe and argues against Roche-lobe overflowing subgiants and main sequence secondary stars if >1% of the transferred mass is lost at the Lagrangian points. Regardless of the density profile, the X-ray non-detections are suggestive of a clean environment (particle density < 150 cm-3) for (2x10^15<R<5x10^16) cm around the progenitor site. This is either consistent with the bulk of material being confined within the binary system or with a significant delay between mass loss and supernova explosion. We furthermore combine X-ray and radio limits from Chomiuk et al. 2012 to constrain the post shock energy density in magnetic fields. Finally, we searched for the shock breakout pulse using gamma-ray observations from the Interplanetary Network and find no compelling evidence for a supernova-associated burst. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor star we estimate that the shock break out pulse was likely not detectable by current satellites.
  • The Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey (MENeaCS) has discovered twenty-three cluster Type Ia supernovae (SNe) in the 58 X-ray selected galaxy clusters (0.05 < z < 0.15) surveyed. Four of our SN Ia events have no host galaxy on close inspection, and are likely intracluster SNe. Deep image stacks at the location of the candidate intracluster SNe put upper limits on the luminosities of faint hosts, with M_{r} > -13.0 mag and M_{g} > -12.5 mag in all cases. For such limits, the fraction of the cluster luminosity in faint dwarfs below our detection limit is <0.1%, assuming a standard cluster luminosity function. All four events occurred within ~600 kpc of the cluster center (projected), as defined by the position of the brightest cluster galaxy, and are more centrally concentrated than the cluster SN Ia population as a whole. After accounting for several observational biases that make intracluster SNe easier to discover and spectroscopically confirm, we calculate an intracluster stellar mass fraction of 0.16^{+0.13}_{-0.09} (68% CL) for all objects within R_{200}. If we assume that the intracluster stellar population is exclusively old, and the cluster galaxies themselves have a mix of stellar ages, we derive an upper limit on the intracluster stellar mass fraction of <0.47 (84% one-sided CL). When combined with the intragroup SNe results of McGee & Balogh, we confirm the declining intracluster stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass reported by Gonzalez and collaborators. (Abridged)
  • We present and discuss the results of an extensive observational campaign devoted to GRB071010A, a long-duration gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite. This event was followed for almost a month in the optical/near-infrared (NIR) with various telescopes starting from about 2min after the high-energy event. Swift-XRT observations started only later at about 0.4d. The light-curve evolution allows us to single out an initial rising phase with a maximum at about 7min, possibly the afterglow onset in the context of the standard fireball model, which is then followed by a smooth decay interrupted by a sharp rebrightening at about 0.6d. The rebrightening was visible in both the optical/NIR and X-rays and can be interpreted as an episode of discrete energy injection, although various alternatives are possible. A steepening of the afterglow light curve is recorded at about 1d. The entire evolution of the optical/NIR afterglow is consistent with being achromatic. This could be one of the few identified GRB afterglows with an achromatic break in the X-ray through the optical/NIR bands. Polarimetry was also obtained at about 1d, just after the rebrightening and almost coincident with the steepening. This provided a fairly tight upper limit of 0.9% for the polarized-flux fraction.
  • We present VRIJHK photometry, and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy, of the heavily extinguished Type Ia supernova (SN) 2002cv, located in NGC 3190, which is also the parent galaxy of the Type Ia SN 2002bo. SN 2002cv, not visible in the blue, has a total visual extinction of 8.74 +- 0.21 mag. In spite of this we were able to obtain the light curves between -10 and +207 days from the maximum in the I band, and also to follow the spectral evolution, deriving its key parameters. We found the peak I-band brightness to be Imax = 16.57 +- 0.10 mag, the maximum absolute I magnitude to be MmaxI = -18.79 +- 0.20, and the parameter dm15(B) specifying the width of the B-band light curve to be 1.46 +- 0.17 mag. The latter was derived using the relations between this parameter and dm40(I) and the time interval dtmax(I) between the two maxima in the I-band light curve. As has been found for previously observed, highly extinguished SNe Ia, a small value of 1.59 +- 0.07 was obtained here for the ratio Rv of the total-to-selective extinction ratio for SN 2002cv, which implies a small mean size for the grains along the line of sight toward us. Since it was found for SN 2002bo a canonical value of 3.1, here we present a clear evidence of different dust properties inside NGC 3190.
  • The nebular spectra of the broad-lined, SN 1998bw-like Type Ic SN 2002ap are studied by means of synthetic spectra. Two different modelling techniques are employed. In one technique, the SN ejecta are treated as a single zone, while in the other a density and abundance distribution in velocity is used from an explosion model. In both cases, heating caused by gamma-ray and positron deposition is computed (in the latter case using a Monte Carlo technique to describe the propagation of gamma-rays and positrons), as is cooling via forbidden-line emission. The results are compared, and although general agreement is found, the stratified models are shown to reproduce the observed line profiles much more accurately than the single-zone model. The explosion produced ~ 0.1 Msun of 56Ni. The distribution in velocity of the various elements is in agreement with that obtained from the early-time models, which indicated an ejected mass of ~ 2.5 Msun with a kinetic energy of 4 x 10^{51} erg. Nebular spectroscopy confirms that most of the ejected mass (~ 1.2 Msun) was oxygen. The presence of an oxygen-rich inner core, combined with that of 56Ni at high velocities as deduced from early-time models, suggests that the explosion was asymmetric, especially in the inner part.
  • We report observations of GRB 050525A, for which a Gemini North spectrum shows its redshift to be z = 0.606. This is the third closest long GRB discovered by Swift. We observed its afterglow using the VLT, Gemini and TNG telescopes to search for an associated SN. We find that the early-time light curve is described by a broken power law with a break at t ~ 0.3 d after the burst. About 5 d after the burst, a flattening is apparent, followed by a further dimming. Both the magnitude and the shape of the light curve suggest that a supernova was emerging during the late decay of the afterglow. This supernova, dubbed SN 2005nc, had a rise time faster than SN 1998bw and a long-lasting maximum. A spectrum obtained about 20 d (rest-frame) after the GRB resembles the spectrum of SN 1998bw obtained close to maximum light.