• We investigate the X-ray active galactic nucleus (AGN) properties of millimeter galaxies in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey South (GOODS-S) field detected with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), by utilizing the Chandra 7-Ms data, the deepest X-ray survey to date. Our millimeter galaxy sample comes from the ASAGAO survey covering 26 arcmin$^2$ (12 sources at a 1.2-mm flux-density limit of $\approx$0.6 mJy), supplemented by the deeper but narrower 1.3-mm survey of a part of the ASAGAO field by Dunlop et al.\ (2017). Fourteen out of the total 25 millimeter galaxies have Chandra counterparts. The observed AGN fractions at $z=1.5-3$ is found to be 90$^{+8}_{-19}$\% and $57^{+23}_{-25}$\% for the ultra/luminous infrared galaxies with $\log L_{\rm IR}/L_{\odot} = 12-12.8$ and $\log L_{\rm IR}/L_{\odot} = 11.5-12$, respectively. The majority ($\sim$2/3) of the ALMA and/or Herschel detected X-ray AGNs at $z=1.5-3$ appear to be star-formation dominant populations, having $L_{\rm X}$/ $L_{\rm IR}$ ratios smaller than the "simultaneous evolution" value expected from the local black-hole mass to stellar mass ($M_{\rm BH}$-$M_*$) relation. On the basis of the $L_{\rm X}$ and stellar mass relation, we infer that a large fraction of star-forming galaxies at $z=1.5-3$ have black hole masses smaller than those expected from the local $M_{\rm BH}$-$M_*$ relation. This is opposite to previous reports on luminous AGN at same redshifts detected in wider and shallower surveys, which are subject to selection biases against lower luminosity AGN. Our results are consistent with an evolutionary scenario that star formation occurs first, and an AGN-dominant phase follows later, in objects finally evolving into galaxies with classical bulges.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory has revealed a very different galaxyscape from that shown by optical surveys which presents a challenge for galaxy-evolution models. The Herschel surveys reveal (1) that there was rapid galaxy evolution in the very recent past and (2) that galaxies lie on a a single Galaxy Sequence (GS) rather than a star-forming `main sequence' and a separate region of `passive' or `red-and-dead' galaxies. The form of the GS is now clearer because far-infrared surveys such as the Herschel ATLAS pick up a population of optically-red star-forming galaxies that would have been classified as passive using most optical criteria. The space-density of this population is at least as high as the traditional star-forming population. By stacking spectra of H-ATLAS galaxies over the redshift range 0.001 < z < 0.4, we show that the galaxies responsible for the rapid low-redshift evolution have high stellar masses, high star-formation rates but, even several billion years in the past, old stellar populations - they are thus likely to be relatively recent ancestors of early-type galaxies in the Universe today. The form of the GS is inconsistent with rapid quenching models and neither the analytic bathtub model nor the hydrodynamical EAGLE simulation can reproduce the rapid cosmic evolution. We propose a new gentler model of galaxy evolution that can explain the new Herschel results and other key properties of the galaxy population.
  • The identification of high-redshift massive galaxies with old stellar populations may pose challenges to some models of galaxy formation. However, to securely classify a galaxy as quiescent, it is necessary to exclude significant ongoing star formation, something that can be challenging to achieve at high redshift. In this letter, we analyse deep ALMA/870um and SCUBA-2/450um imaging of the claimed "post-starburst" galaxy ZF-20115 at z=3.717 that exhibits a strong Balmer break and absorption lines. The far-infrared imaging reveals a luminous starburst located 0.4+/-0.1 arcsec (~3kpc in projection) from the position of the rest-frame ultra-violet/optical emission, with an obscured star-formation rate of 100 Mo/yr. This star-forming component is undetected in the rest-frame ultraviolet but contributes significantly to the lower angular resolution photometry at restframe wavelengths >3500A, significantly complicating the determination of a reliable stellar mass. Importantly, in the presence of dust obscuration, strong Balmer features are not a unique signature of a post-starburst galaxy and are indeed frequently observed in infrared-luminous galaxies. We conclude that the ZF20015 system does not pose a challenge to current models of galaxy formation and that deep sub-/millimeter observations are a prerequisite for any claims of quiescence. The multi-wavelength observations of ZF20115 unveil a complex system with an intricate and spatially-varying star-formation history. ZF20115 demonstrates that understanding high-redshift obscured starbursts will only be possible with multi-wavelength studies that include high-resolution observations, available with the JWST, at mid-infrared wavelengths.
  • We report the result from observations conducted with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect [CII] 158 um fine structure line emission from galaxies embedded in one of the most spectacular Lyman-alpha blobs (LABs) at z=3.1, SSA22-LAB1. Of three dusty star-forming galaxies previously discovered by ALMA 860 um dust continuum survey toward SSA22-LAB1, we detected the [CII] line from one, LAB1-ALMA3 at z=3.0993+/-0.0004. No line emission was detected, associated with the other ALMA continuum sources or from three rest-frame UV/optical selected z_spec~3.1 galaxies within the field of view. For LAB1-ALMA3, we find relatively bright [CII] emission compared to the infrared luminosity (L_[CII]/L_[CII]) and an extremely high [CII] 158 um and [NII] 205 um emission line ratio (L_[CII]/L_[NII]>55). The relatively strong [CII] emission may be caused by abundant photodissociation regions and sub-solar metallicity, or by shock heating. The origin of the unusually strong [CII] emission could be causally related to the location within the giant LAB, although the relationship between extended Lyman-alpha emission and ISM conditions of associated galaxies is yet to be understand.
  • We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • We present results from a deep 2'x3' (comoving scale of 3.7 Mpc x 5.5 Mpc at z=3) survey at 1.1 mm taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the SSA22 field. We observe the core region of a z = 3.09 protocluster, achieving a typical rms sensitivity of 60 micro-Jy/beam at a spatial resolution of 0".7. We detect 18 robust ALMA sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 5. Comparison between the ALMA map and a 1.1 mm map taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) indicates that three submillimeter sources discovered by the AzTEC/ASTE survey are resolved into eight individual submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) by ALMA. At least ten of our 18 ALMA SMGs have spectroscopic redshifts of z = 3.09, placing them in the protocluster. This shows that a number of dusty starburst galaxies are forming simultaneously in the core of the protocluster. The nine brightest ALMA SMGs with SNR > 10 have a median intrinsic angular size of 0".32+0".13-0".06 (2.4+1.0-0.4 physical kpc at z = 3.09), which is consistent with previous size measurements of SMGs in other fields. As expected the source counts show a possible excess compared to the counts in the general fields at S_1.1mm >= 1.0 mJy due to the protocluster. Our contiguous mm mapping highlights the importance of large-scale structures on the formation of dusty starburst galaxies.
  • We present a study of the dust, stars and atomic gas (HI) in an HI-selected sample of local galaxies (z<0.035) in the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) fields. This HI-selected sample reveals a population of very high gas fraction (>80 per cent), low stellar mass sources that appear to be in the earliest stages of their evolution. We compare this sample with dust and stellar mass selected samples to study the dust and gas scaling relations over a wide range of gas fraction (proxy for evolutionary state of a galaxy). The most robust scaling relations for gas and dust are those linked to NUV-r (SSFR) and gas fraction, these do not depend on sample selection or environment. At the highest gas fractions, our additional sample shows the dust content is well below expectations from extrapolating scaling relations for more evolved sources, and dust is not a good tracer of the gas content. The specific dust mass for local galaxies peaks at a gas fraction of ~75 per cent. The atomic gas depletion time is also longer for high gas fraction galaxies, opposite to the trend found for molecular gas depletion timescale. We link this trend to the changing efficiency of conversion of HI to H2 as galaxies increase in stellar mass surface density as they evolve. Finally, we show that galaxies start out barely obscured and increase in obscuration as they evolve, yet there is no clear and simple link between obscuration and global galaxy properties.
  • In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \sim 2$ to $z \sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This trend is similar to the observed evolution of the cosmic star formation rate density. The latter therefore appears to be at least partly driven by the increased availability of molecular gas reservoirs at the peak of cosmic star formation ($z\sim2$).
  • We present the first major data release of the largest single key-project in area carried out in open time with the Herschel Space Observatory. The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) is a survey of 600 deg^2 in five photometric bands - 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 um - with the PACS and SPIRE cameras. In this paper and a companion paper (Bourne et al. 2016) we present the survey of three fields on the celestial equator, covering a total area of 161.6 deg^2 and previously observed in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) spectroscopic survey. This paper describes the Herschel images and catalogues of the sources detected on the SPIRE 250 um images. The 1-sigma noise for source detection, including both confusion and instrumental noise, is 7.4, 9.4 and 10.2 mJy at 250, 350 and 500 um. Our catalogue includes 120230 sources in total, with 113995, 46209 and 11011 sources detected at >4-sigma at 250, 350 and 500 um. The catalogue contains detections at >3-sigma at 100 and 160 um for 4650 and 5685 sources, and the typical noise at these wavelengths is 44 and 49 mJy. We include estimates of the completeness of the survey and of the effects of flux bias and also describe a novel method for determining the true source counts. The H-ATLAS source counts are very similar to the source counts from the deeper HerMES survey at 250 and 350 um, with a small difference at 500 um. Appendix A provides a quick start in using the released datasets, including instructions and cautions on how to use them.
  • We investigate the region around the Planck-detected z=3.26 gravitationally lensed galaxy HATLAS J114637.9-001132 (hereinafter HATLAS12-00) using both archival Herschel data from the H-ATLAS survey and using submm data obtained with both LABOCA and SCUBA2. The lensed source is found to be surrounded by a strong overdensity of both Herschel-SPIRE sources and submm sources. We detect 17 bright (S_870 >~7 mJy) sources at >4sigma closer than 5 arcmin to the lensed object at 850/870 microns. Ten of these sources have good cross-identifications with objects detected by Herschel-SPIRE which have redder colours than other sources in the field, with 350 micron flux > 250 micron flux, suggesting that they lie at high redshift. Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations localise one of these companions to ~1 arcsecond, allowing unambiguous cross identification with a 3.6 and 4.5 micron Spitzer source. The optical/near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) of this source is measured by further observations and found to be consistent with z>2, but incompatible with lower redshifts. We conclude that this system may be a galaxy cluster/protocluster or larger scale structure that contains a number of galaxies undergoing starbursts at the same time.
  • ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the long wavelength dust emission in 145 star-forming galaxies are used to probe the evolution of star-forming ISM. We also develop the physical basis and empirical calibration (with 72 low-z and z ~ 2 galaxies) for using the dust continuum as a quantitative probe of interstellar medium (ISM) masses. The galaxies with highest star formation rates (SFRs) at <z> = 2.2 and 4.4 have gas masses up to 100 times that of the Milky Way and gas mass fractions reaching 50 to 80%, i.e. gas masses 1 - 4 times their stellar masses. We find a single high-z star formation law: SFR = 35 M_ mol^0.89 x (1+z)_{z=2}^0.95 x (sSFR)_{MS}^0.23 \msun yr^-1 -- an approximately linear dependence on the ISM mass and an increased star formation efficiency per unit gas mass at higher redshift. Galaxies above the Main Sequence (MS) have larger gas masses but are converting their ISM into stars on a timescale only slightly shorter than those on the MS -- thus these 'starbursts' are largely the result of having greatly increased gas masses rather than and increased efficiency for converting gas to stars. At z $> 1$, the entire population of star-forming galaxies has $\sim$ 2 - 5 times shorter gas depletion times than low-z galaxies. These shorter depletion times indicate a different mode of star formation in the early universe -- most likely dynamically driven by compressive, high-dispersion gas motions -- a natural consequence of the high gas accretion rates.
  • We present a list of candidate gravitationally lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) from the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS) and the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS). Together, these partially overlapping surveys cover 372 deg$^{2}$ on the sky. After removing local spiral galaxies and known radio-loud blazars, our candidate list of lensed DSFGs is composed of 77 sources with 500 $\mu$m flux densities ($S_{500}$) greater than 100 mJy. Such sources are dusty starburst galaxies similar to the first bright Sub Millimeter Galaxies (SMGs) discovered with SCUBA. We expect a large fraction of this list to be strongly lensed, with a small fraction made up of bright SMG-SMG mergers that appear as Hyper-Luminous Infrared Galaxies (HyLIRGs; $\rm L_{IR}>10^{13} L_{\odot}$). Thirteen of the 77 candidates have spectroscopic redshifts from CO spectroscopy with ground-based interferometers, putting them at $z>1$ and well above the redshift of the foreground lensing galaxies. The surface density of our sample is 0.21 $\pm$ 0.03 deg$^{-2}$. We present follow-up imaging of a few of the candidates confirming their lensing nature. The sample presented here is an ideal tool for higher resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations to understand detailed properties of starburst phenomena in distant galaxies.
  • We used wide area surveys over 39 deg$^2$ by the HerMES collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multi-wavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, $0.02<z<0.5$, monochromatic luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500$\,\mu$m. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multi-wavelength archival data to perform a complete SED fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (8-1000$\,\mu$m) luminosity functions and their low-$z$ evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density (LLD) and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The luminosity functions show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, $0.02<z<0.2$, with L$_{IR}^* \propto (1+z)^{6.0\pm0.4}$ and $\Phi_{IR}^* \propto (1+z)^{-2.1\pm0.4}$, L$_{250}^* \propto (1+z)^{5.3\pm0.2}$ and $\Phi_{250}^* \propto (1+z)^{-0.6\pm0.4}$ estimated using the IR bolometric and the 250$\,\mu$m LFs respectively. Converting our IR LD estimate into an SFRD assuming a standard Salpeter IMF and including the unobscured contribution based on the UV dust-uncorrected emission from local galaxies, we estimate a SFRD scaling of SFRD$_0+0.08 z$, where SFRD$_0\simeq (1.9\pm 0.03)\times 10^{-2} [\mathrm{M}_\odot\,\mathrm{Mpc}^{-3}]$ is our total SFRD estimate at $z\sim0.02$.
  • We present far-infrared and submillimeter maps from the Herschel Space Observatory and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope of the debris disk host star AU Microscopii. Disk emission is detected at 70, 160, 250, 350, 450, 500 and 850 micron. The disk is resolved at 70, 160 and 450 micron. In addition to the planetesimal belt, we detect thermal emission from AU Mic's halo for the first time. In contrast to the scattered light images, no asymmetries are evident in the disk. The fractional luminosity of the disk is $3.9 \times 10^{-4}$ and its mm-grain dust mass is 0.01 MEarth (+/- 20%). We create a simple spatial model that reconciles the disk SED as a blackbody of 53 +/- 2 K (a composite of 39 and 50 K components) and the presence of small (non-blackbody) grains which populate the extended halo. The best fit model is consistent with the "birth ring" model explored in earlier works, i.e., an edge-on dust belt extending from 8.8-40 AU, but with an additional halo component with an $r^{-1.5}$ surface density profile extending to the limits of sensitivity (140 AU). We confirm that AU Mic does not exert enough radiation force to blow out grains. For stellar mass loss rates of 10-100x solar, compact (zero porosity) grains can only be removed if they are very small, consistently with previous work, if the porosity is 0.9, then grains approaching 0.1 micron can be removed via corpuscular forces (i.e., the stellar wind).
  • We examine the relationship between star formation and AGN activity by constructing matched samples of local ($0<z<0.6$) radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN in the $\textit{Herschel}$-ATLAS fields. Radio-loud AGN are classified as high-excitation and low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs, LERGs) using their emission lines and $\textit{WISE}$ 22-$\mu$m luminosity. AGN accretion and jet powers in these active galaxies are traced by [OIII] emission-line and radio luminosity, respectively. Star formation rates (SFRs) and specific star formation rates (SSFRs) were derived using $\textit{Herschel}$ 250-$\mu$m luminosity and stellar mass measurements from the SDSS$-$MPA-JHU catalogue. In the past, star formation studies of AGN have mostly focused on high-redshift sources to observe the thermal dust emission that peaks in the far-infrared, which limited the samples to powerful objects. However, with $\textit{Herschel}$ we can expand this to low redshifts. Our stacking analyses show that SFRs and SSFRs of both radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN increase with increasing AGN power but that radio-loud AGN tend to have lower SFR. Additionally, radio-quiet AGN are found to have approximately an order of magnitude higher SSFRs than radio-loud AGN for a given level of AGN power. The difference between the star formation properties of radio-loud and -quiet AGN is also seen in samples matched in stellar mass.
  • The Herschel Space Observatory has had a tremendous impact on the study of extragalactic dust. Specifically, early-type galaxies (ETG) have been the focus of several studies. In this paper we combine results from two Herschel studies - a Virgo cluster study HeViCS and a broader, low-redshift H-ATLAS/GAMA study - and contrast the dust and associated properties for similar mass galaxies. This comparison is motivated by differences in results exhibited between multiple Herschel studies of early-type galaxies. A comparison between consistent modified blackbody derived dust mass is carried out, revealing strong differences between the two samples in both dust mass and dust-to-stellar mass ratio. In particular, the HeViCS sample lacks massive ETG with as high a specific dust content as found in H-ATLAS. This is most likely connected with the difference in environment for the two samples. We calculate nearest neighbour environment densities in a consistent way, showing that H-ATLAS ETG occupy sparser regions of the local Universe, whereas HeViCS ETG occupy dense regions. This is also true for ETG that are not Herschel-detected but are in the Virgo and GAMA parent samples. Spectral energy distributions are fit to the panchromatic data. From these we find that in H-ATLAS the specific star formation rate anticorrelates with stellar mass and reaches values as high as in our Galaxy. On the other hand HeViCS ETG appear to have little star formation. Based on the trends found here, H-ATLAS ETG are thought to have more extended star formation histories and a younger stellar population than HeViCS ETG.
  • We present the results of deep \chandra\ imaging of the central region of the Extended Groth Strip, the AEGIS-X Deep (AEGIS-XD) survey. When combined with previous \chandra\ observations of a wider area of the strip, AEGIS-X Wide (AEGIS-XW; Laird et~al. 2009), these provide data to a nominal exposure depth of 800ks in the three central ACIS-I fields, a region of approximately $0.29$~deg$^{2}$. This is currently the third deepest X-ray survey in existence, a factor $\sim 2-3$ shallower than the Chandra Deep Fields (CDFs) but over an area $\sim 3$ times greater than each CDF. We present a catalogue of 937 point sources detected in the deep \chandra\ observations. We present identifications of our X-ray sources from deep ground-based, Spitzer, GALEX and HST imaging. Using a likelihood ratio analysis, we associate multi band counterparts for 929/937 of our X-ray sources, with an estimated 95~\% reliability, making the identification completeness approximately 94~\% in a statistical sense. Reliable spectroscopic redshifts for 353 of our X-ray sources are provided predominantly from Keck (DEEP2/3) and MMT Hectospec, so the current spectroscopic completeness is $\sim 38$~per cent. For the remainder of the X-ray sources, we compute photometric redshifts based on multi-band photometry in up to 35 bands from the UV to mid-IR. Particular attention is given to the fact that the vast majority the X-ray sources are AGN and require hybrid templates. Our photometric redshifts have mean accuracy of $\sigma=0.04$ and an outlier fraction of approximately 5\%, reaching $\sigma=0.03$ with less than 4\% outliers in the area covered by CANDELS . The X-ray, multi-wavelength photometry and redshift catalogues are made publicly available.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFC3 imaging and grism spectroscopy observations of the {\it Herschel}-selected gravitationally-lensed starburst galaxy HATLASJ1429-0028. The lensing system consists of an edge-on foreground disk galaxy at $z=0.218$ with a nearly complete Einstein ring of the infrared luminous galaxy at $z=1.027$. The WFC3 spectroscopy with G102 and G141 grisms, covering the wavelength range of 0.8 to 1.7 $\mu$m, resulted in detections of H$\alpha$+[NII], H$\beta$, [SII], and [OIII] for the background galaxy from which we measure line fluxes and ratios. The Balmer line ratio H$\alpha$/H$\beta$ of $7.5 \pm 4.4$, when corrected for [NII], results in an extinction for the starburst galaxy of $E(B-V)=0.8 \pm 0.5$. The $H\alpha$ based star-formation rate, when corrected for extinction, is $60 \pm 50$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$, lower than the instantaneous star-formation rate of 390 $\pm$ 90 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ from the total IR luminosity. We also compare the nebular line ratios of HATLASJ1429-0028 with other star-forming and sub-mm bright galaxies. The nebular line ratios are consistent with an intrinsic ultra-luminous infrared galaxy with no evidence for excitation by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We estimate the metallicity, $12 + log(O/H)$, of HATLASJ1429-0028 to be 8.49 $\pm$ 0.16. Such a low value is below the average relations for stellar mass vs. metallicity of galaxies at $z \sim 1$ for a galaxy with stellar mass of $\sim 2 \times 10^{11}$ M$_{\odot}$. The combination of high stellar mass, lack of AGN indicators, low metallicity, and the high star-formation rate of HATLASJ1429-0028 suggest that this galaxy is currently undergoing a rapid formation.
  • We explore the behaviour of [CII]-157.74um forbidden fine-structure line observed in a sample of 28 galaxies selected from ~50deg^2 of the H-ATLAS survey. The sample is restricted to galaxies with flux densities higher than S_160um>150mJy and optical spectra from the GAMA survey at 0.02<z<0.2. Far-IR spectra centred on this redshifted line were taken with the PACS instrument on-board the Herschel Space Observatory. The galaxies span 10<log(L_IR/Lo)<12 (where L_IR=L_IR[8-1000um]) and 7.3<log(L_[CII]/Lo)<9.3, covering a variety of optical galaxy morphologies. The sample exhibits the so-called [CII] deficit at high IR luminosities, i.e. L_[CII]/L_IR (hereafter [CII]/IR) decreases at high L_IR. We find significant differences between those galaxies presenting [CII]/IR>2.5x10^-3 with respect to those showing lower ratios. In particular, those with high ratios tend to have: (1) L_IR<10^11Lo; (2) cold dust temperatures, T_d<30K; (3) disk-like morphologies in r-band images; (4) a WISE colour 0.5<S_12um/S_22um<1.0; (5) low surface brightness Sigma_IR~10^8-9 Lo kpc^-2, (6) and specific star-formation rates of sSFR~0.05-3 Gyr^-1. We suggest that the strength of the far-UV radiation fields (<G_O>) is main parameter responsible for controlling the [CII]/IR ratio. It is possible that relatively high <G_O> creates a positively charged dust grain distribution, impeding an efficient photo-electric extraction of electrons from these grains to then collisionally excite carbon atoms. Within the brighter IR population, 11<log(L_IR/Lo)<12, the low [CII]/IR ratio is unlikely to be modified by [CII] self absorption or controlled by the presence of a moderately luminous AGN (identified via the BPT diagram).
  • We describe a search for submillimeter emission in the vicinity of one of the most distant, luminous galaxies known, HerMES FLS3 at z=6.34, exploiting it as a signpost to a potentially biased region of the early Universe, as might be expected in hierarchical structure formation models. Imaging to the confusion limit with the innovative, wide-field submillimeter bolometer camera, SCUBA-2, we are sensitive to colder and/or less luminous galaxies in the surroundings of HFLS3. We use the Millennium Simulation to illustrate that HFLS3 may be expected to have companions if it is as massive as claimed, but find no significant evidence from the surface density of SCUBA-2 galaxies in its vicinity, or their colors, that HFLS3 marks an over-density of dusty, star-forming galaxies. We cannot rule out the presence of dusty neighbours with confidence, but deeper 450-um imaging has the potential to more tightly constrain the redshifts of nearby galaxies, at least one of which likely lies at z>~5. If associations with HFLS3 can be ruled out, this could be taken as evidence that HFLS3 is less biased than a simple extrapolation of the Millennium Simulation may imply. This could suggest either that it represents a rare short-lived, but highly luminous, phase in the evolution of an otherwise typical galaxy, or that this system has suffered amplification due to a foreground gravitational lens and so is not as intrinsically luminous as claimed.
  • We use the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) Phase I data to study the conditional luminosity function of far-IR (250 um) selected galaxies in optically-selected galaxy groups from the GAMA spectroscopic survey, as well as environmental effects on the far-IR-to-optical colour. We applied two methods, which gave consistent results for the far-IR conditional luminosity functions. The direct matching method matches H-ATLAS sources to GAMA/SDSS galaxies, then links the optical counterparts to GAMA groups. The stacking method counts the number of far-IR sources within the projected radii of GAMA groups, subtracting the local background. We investigated the dependence of the far-IR (250 um) luminosity function on group mass in the range 10d12 < M_h < 10d14Msun/h and on redshift in the range 0 < z < 0.4, using a sample of 3000 groups containing H-ATLAS sources with GAMA redshifts over an area of 126 sq. deg. We find that the characteristic 250 um luminosity, L^*(250), increases with group mass up to M_h ~ 10d13Msun/h, but is roughly constant above this, while it increases with redshift at high group masses, but less so at low masses. We also find that the group far-IR luminosity-to-mass ratio L(250)/M_h increases with redshift and is higher in low-mass groups. We estimate that around 70% of the 250 um luminosity density in the local universe is contributed by groups with M_h > 10d12Msun/h. We also find that the far-IR-to-optical colours of H-ATLAS galaxies are independent of group mass over the range 10d12 < M_h <10d14Msun/h in the local universe. We also compare our observational results with recent semi-analytical models, and find that none of these galaxy formation model can reproduce the conditional far-IR luminosity functions of galaxy groups.
  • We present a study of the radio properties of 870$\mu$m-selected submillimetre galaxies (SMGs), observed at high resolution with ALMA in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. From our initial sample of 76 ALMA SMGs, we detect 52 SMGs at $>3\sigma$ significance in VLA 1400MHz imaging, of which 35 are also detected at $>3\sigma$ in new 610MHz GMRT imaging. Within this sample of radio-detected SMGs, we measure a median radio spectral index $\alpha_{610}^{1400} = -0.79 \pm 0.06$, (with inter-quartile range $\alpha=[-1.16,-0.56]$) and investigate the far-infrared/radio correlation via the parameter $q_{\rm IR}$, the logarithmic ratio of the rest-frame 8-1000$\mu$m flux and monochromatic radio flux. Our median $q_{\rm IR} = 2.56 \pm 0.05$ (inter-quartile range $q_{\rm IR}=[2.42,2.78]$) is higher than that typically seen in single-dish 870$\mu$m-selected sources ($q_{\rm IR} \sim 2.4$), which may reflect the fact that our ALMA-based study is not biased to radio-bright counterparts, as previous samples were. Finally, we search for evidence that $q_{\rm IR}$ and $\alpha$ evolve with age in a co-dependent manner, as predicted by starburst models: the data populate the predicted region of parameter space, with the stellar mass tending to increase along tracks of $q_{\rm IR}$ versus $\alpha$ in the direction expected, providing the first observational evidence in support of these models.
  • We discuss the restframe UV emission from the starbursting galaxy HFLS3 at z=6.34, discovered in Herschel/SPIRE data due to its red color in the submm wavelengths from 250-500 um. The apparent inst. SFR of HFLS3 inferred from the total FIR luminosity measured with over 15 photometric data points between 100 to 1000 um is 2900 Msun/yr. Keck/NIRC2 Ks band adaptive optics imaging data showed two potential NIR counterparts near HFLS3. Previously, the northern galaxy was taken to be in the foreground at z=2.1 while the southern galaxy was assumed to HFLS3's NIR counterpart. New HST/WFC3 and ACS imaging data show both optically bright galaxies are in the foreground at z<6. A new lensing model based on HST data and mm-wave continuum emission yields a magnification of 2.2+/-0.3. The lack of multiple imaging constrains the lensing magnification to be lower than either 2.7 or 3.5 at the 95% confidence level for the two scenarios, which attribute one or two components to HFLS3 in the source plane. Correcting for gravitational lensing, the inst. SFR is 1320 Msun/yr with the 95% confidence lower limit around 830 Msun/yr. Using models for the restframe UV to FIR SED, the ave. SFR over the last 100 Myr is around 660 Msun/yr. The dust and stellar masses of HFLS3 from the same SED models are 3x10^8 Msun and ~5x10^10 Msun, respectively, with large systematic uncertainties on assumptions related to the SED model. With HST/WFC3 images we also find diffuse NIR emission about 0.5" (~3 kpc) SW of HFLS3 that remains undetected in the ACS data. The emission has a photometric redshift consistent with either z~6 or a dusty galaxy template at z~2. If at the same redshift as HFLS3 the detected diffuse emission could be part of the complex merger system that could be triggering the starburst. Alternatively, it could be part of the foreground structure at z~2.1 that is responsible for lensing of HFLS3.
  • The $\textit{Herschel}$ DEBRIS, DUNES and GT programmes observed 37 exoplanet host stars within 25 pc at 70, 100 and 160 $\mu$m with the sensitivity to detect far-infrared excess emission at flux density levels only an order of magnitude greater than that of the Solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. Here we present an analysis of that sample, using it to more accurately determine the (possible) level of dust emission from these exoplanet host stars and thereafter determine the links between the various components of these exoplanetary systems through statistical analysis. We have fitted the flux densities measured from recent \textit{Herschel} observations with a simple two parameter ($T_{d}$, $L_{\rm IR}/L_{\star}$) black body model (or to the 3-$\sigma$ upper limits at 100 $\mu$m). From this uniform approach we calculate the fractional luminosity, radial extent, dust temperature and disc mass. We then plotted the calculated dust luminosity or upper limits against the stellar properties, e.g. effective temperature, metallicity, age, and identified correlations between these parameters. A total of eleven debris discs are identified around the 37 stars in the sample. An incidence of ten cool debris discs around the Sun-like exoplanet host stars (29 $\pm$ 9 %) is consistent with the detection rate found by DUNES (20.2 $\pm$ 2.0 %). For the debris disc systems, the dust temperatures range from 20 to 80 K, and fractional luminosities ($L_{\rm IR}/L_{\star}$) between 2.4 $\times$10$^{-6}$ and 4.1 $\times$10$^{-4}$. In the case of non-detections, we calculated typical 3-$\sigma$ upper limits to the dust fractional luminosities of a few $\times10^{-6}$. We recover the previously identified correlation between stellar metallicity and hot Jupiter planets in our data set. We find a correlation between the increased presence of dust, lower planet masses and lower stellar metallicities. (abridged)
  • We study the far-infrared properties of 498 Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, using 250, 350 and 500 micron data from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) and 870 micron data from the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (LESS). None of the 126, 280 or 92 LAEs at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, respectively, are individually detected in the far-infrared data. We use stacking to probe the average emission to deeper flux limits, reaching $1\sigma$ depths of ~0.1 to 0.4 mJy. The LAEs are also undetected at $\ge3\sigma$ in the stacks, although a $2.5\sigma$ signal is observed at 870 micron for the z=2.8 sources. We consider a wide range of far-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), including a M82 and an Sd galaxy template, to determine upper limits on the far-infrared luminosities and far-infrared-derived star-formation rates of the LAEs. These star-formation rates are then combined with those inferred from the Ly$\alpha$ and UV emission to determine lower limits on the LAEs Ly$\alpha$ escape fraction ($f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$)). For the Sd SED template, the inferred LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) are $\gtrsim30%$ ($1\sigma$) at z=2.8, 3.1 and 4.5, which are all significantly higher than the global $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) at these redshifts. Thus, if the LAEs $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) follows the global evolution then they have warmer far-infrared SEDs than the Sd galaxy template. The average and M82 SEDs produce lower limits on the LAE $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) of ~10 to 20% ($1\sigma$), all of which are slightly higher than the global evolution of $f_{\rm esc}($Ly$\alpha$) but consistent with it at the 2 to 3$\sigma$ level.