• We use the largest sample of z~6 galaxies to date from the first four Hubble Frontier Fields clusters to set constraints on the shape of the z~6 luminosity functions (LFs) to fainter than Muv=-14 mag. We quantify, for the first time, the impact of magnification uncertainties on LF results and thus provide more realistic constraints than other recent work. Our simulations reveal that for the highly-magnified sources the systematic uncertainties can become extremely large fainter than -14 mag, reaching several orders of magnitude at 95% confidence at ~-12 mag. Our new forward-modeling formalism incorporates the impact of magnification uncertainties into the LF results by exploiting the availability of many independent magnification models for the same cluster. One public magnification model is used to construct a mock high-redshift galaxy sample that is then analyzed using the other magnification models to construct a LF. Large systematic errors occur at high magnifications (mu>30) because of differences between the models. The volume densities we derive for faint (>-17 mag) sources are ~3-4x lower than one recent report and give a faint-end slope alpha=-1.92+/-0.04, which is 3.0-3.5sigma shallower (including or not including the size uncertainties, respectively). We introduce a new curvature parameter delta to model the faint end of the LF and demonstrate that the observations permit (at 68% confidence) a turn-over at z~6 in the range -15.3 to -14.2 mag, depending on the assumed lensing model. The present consideration of magnification errors and new size determinations raise doubts about previous reports regarding the form of the LF at >-14 mag. We discuss the implications of our turn-over constraints in the context of recent theoretical predictions.
  • We present the results of the first, deep ALMA imaging covering the full 4.5 sq arcmin of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) as previously imaged with WFC3/IR on HST. Using a mosaic of 45 pointings, we have obtained a homogeneous 1.3mm image of the HUDF, achieving an rms sensitivity of 35 microJy, at a resolution of 0.7 arcsec. From an initial list of ~50 >3.5sigma peaks, a rigorous analysis confirms 16 sources with flux densities S(1.3) > 120 microJy. All of these have secure galaxy counterparts with robust redshifts (<z> = 2.15), and 12 are also detected at 6GHz in new deep JVLA imaging. Due to the wealth of supporting data in this unique field, the physical properties of the ALMA sources are well constrained, including their stellar masses (M*) and UV+FIR star-formation rates (SFR). Our results show that stellar mass is the best predictor of SFR in the high-z Universe; indeed at z > 2 our ALMA sample contains 7 of the 9 galaxies in the HUDF with M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun and we detect only one galaxy at z > 3.5, reflecting the rapid drop-off of high-mass galaxies with increasing redshift. The detections, coupled with stacking, allow us to probe the redshift/mass distribution of the 1.3-mm background down to S(1.3) ~ 10 micro-Jy. We find strong evidence for a steep `main sequence' for star-forming galaxies at z ~ 2, with SFR \propto M* and a mean specific SFR = 2.2 /Gyr. Moreover, we find that ~85% of total star formation at z ~ 2 is enshrouded in dust, with ~65% of all star formation at this epoch occurring in high-mass galaxies (M* > 2 x 10^10 Msun), for which the average obscured:unobscured SF ratio is ~200. Finally, we combine our new ALMA results with the existing HST data to revisit the cosmic evolution of star-formation rate density; we find that this peaks at z ~ 2.5, and that the star-forming Universe transits from primarily unobscured to primarily obscured thereafter at z ~ 4.
  • We present adaptive optics-assisted integral field spectroscopy around the Ha or Hb lines of 12 gravitationally lensed galaxies obtained with VLT/SINFONI, Keck/OSIRIS and Gemini/NIFS. We combine these data with previous observations and investigate the dynamics and star formation properties of 17 lensed galaxies at z = 1-4. Thanks to gravitational magnification of 1.4 - 90x by foreground clusters, effective spatial resolutions of 40 - 700 pc are achieved. The magnification also allows us to probe lower star formation rates and stellar masses than unlensed samples; our target galaxies feature dust-corrected SFRs derived from Ha or Hb emission of 0.8 - 40Msol/yr, and stellar masses M* ~ 4e8 - 6e10 Msol. All of the galaxies have velocity gradients, with 59% consistent with being rotating discs and a likely merger fraction of 29%, with the remaining 12% classed as 'undetermined.' We extract 50 star-forming clumps with sizes in the range 60pc - 1kpc from the Ha (or Hb) maps, and find that their surface brightnesses and their characteristic luminosities evolve to higher luminosities with redshift. We show that this evolution can be described by fragmentation on larger scales in gas-rich discs, and is likely to be driven by evolving gas fractions.
  • Using deep Keck spectroscopy of Lyman break galaxies selected from infrared imaging data taken with WFC3/IR onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, we present new evidence for a reversal in the redshift-dependent fraction of star forming galaxies with detectable Lyman alpha emission in the redshift range 6.3 < z < 8.8. Our earlier surveys with the DEIMOS spectrograph demonstrated a significant increase with redshift in the fraction of line emitting galaxies over the interval 4 < z < 6, particularly for intrinsically faint systems which dominate the luminosity density. Using the longer wavelength sensitivities of LRIS and NIRSPEC, we have targeted 19 Lyman break galaxies selected using recent WFC3/IR data whose photometric redshifts are in the range 6.3 < z < 8.8 and which span a wide range of intrinsic luminosities. Our spectroscopic exposures typically reach a 5-sigma sensitivity of < 50 A for the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) of Lyman alpha emission. Despite the high fraction of emitters seen only a few hundred million years later, we find only 2 convincing and 1 possible line emitter in our more distant sample. Combining with published data on a further 7 sources obtained using FORS2 on the ESO VLT, and assuming continuity in the trends found at lower redshift, we discuss the significance of this apparent reversal in the redshift-dependent Lyman alpha fraction in the context of our range in continuum luminosity. Assuming all the targeted sources are at their photometric redshift and our assumptions about the Lyman alpha EW distribution are correct, we would expect to find so few emitters in less than 1% of the realizations drawn from our lower redshift samples. Our new results provide further support for the suggestion that, at the redshifts now being probed spectroscopically, we are entering the era where the intergalactic medium is partially neutral.
  • We present the results of a photometric redshift analysis designed to identify z>6 galaxies from the near-IR HST imaging in three deep fields (HUDF, HUDF09-2 & ERS). By adopting a rigorous set of criteria for rejecting low-z interlopers, and by employing a deconfusion technique to allow the available IRAC imaging to be included in the candidate selection process, we have derived a robust sample of 70 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) spanning the redshift range 6.0<z<8.7. Based on our final sample we investigate the distribution of UV spectral slopes (beta), finding a variance-weighted mean value of <beta>=-2.05 +/- 0.09 which, contrary to some previous results, is not significantly bluer than displayed by lower-redshift starburst galaxies. We confirm the correlation between UV luminosity and stellar mass reported elsewhere, but based on fitting galaxy templates featuring a range of star-formation histories, metallicities and reddening we find that, at z>=6, the range in mass-to-light ratio (M*/L_UV) at a given UV luminosity could span a factor of ~50. Focusing on a sub-sample of twenty-one candidates with IRAC detections at 3.6-microns we find that L* LBGs at z~6.5 have a median stellar mass of M* = (2.1 +/- 1.1) x 10^9 Msun and a median specific star-formation rate of 1.9 +/- 0.8 Gyr^-1. Using the same sub-sample we have investigated the influence of nebular continuum and line emission, finding that for the majority of candidates (16 out of 21) the best-fitting stellar-mass estimates are reduced by less than a factor of 2.5. Finally, a detailed comparison of our final sample with the results of previous studies suggests that, at faint magnitudes, several high-redshift galaxy samples in the literature are significantly contaminated by low-redshift interlopers (abridged).
  • We combine high redshift Type Ia supernovae from the first 3 years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) with other supernova (SN) samples, primarily at lower redshifts, to form a high-quality joint sample of 472 SNe (123 low-$z$, 93 SDSS, 242 SNLS, and 14 {\it Hubble Space Telescope}). SN data alone require cosmic acceleration at >99.9% confidence, including systematic effects. For the dark energy equation of state parameter (assumed constant out to at least $z=1.4$) in a flat universe, we find $w = -0.91^{+0.16}_{-0.20}(\mathrm{stat}) ^{+0.07}_{-0.14} (\mathrm{sys})$ from SNe only, consistent with a cosmological constant. Our fits include a correction for the recently discovered relationship between host-galaxy mass and SN absolute brightness. We pay particular attention to systematic uncertainties, characterizing them using a systematics covariance matrix that incorporates the redshift dependence of these effects, as well as the shape-luminosity and color-luminosity relationships. Unlike previous work, we include the effects of systematic terms on the empirical light-curve models. The total systematic uncertainty is dominated by calibration terms. We describe how the systematic uncertainties can be reduced with soon to be available improved nearby and intermediate-redshift samples, particularly those calibrated onto USNO/SDSS-like systems.
  • We present photometric properties and distance measurements of 252 high redshift Type Ia supernovae (0.15 < z < 1.1) discovered during the first three years of the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-colour light curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshifts. Systematic uncertainties arising from light curve modeling are studied, making use of two techniques to derive the peak magnitude, shape and colour of the supernovae, and taking advantage of a precise calibration of the SNLS fields. A flat LambdaCDM cosmological fit to 231 SNLS high redshift Type Ia supernovae alone gives Omega_M = 0.211 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.069(sys). The dominant systematic uncertainty comes from uncertainties in the photometric calibration. Systematic uncertainties from light curve fitters come next with a total contribution of +/- 0.026 on Omega_M. No clear evidence is found for a possible evolution of the slope (beta) of the colour-luminosity relation with redshift.
  • We present the results of a systematic search for galaxies in the redshift range z = 6 - 9, within the new, deep, near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field provided by the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on HST. We have performed full SED fitting to the optical+infrared photometry of all high-redshift galaxy candidates detected at greater than 5-sigma in at least one of the WFC3/IR broad-band filters. After rejection of contaminants, the result is a sample of 49 galaxies with primary redshift solutions z > 5.9. Our sample, selected without recourse to specific colour cuts, re-selects all but the faintest one of the 16 z-drops selected by Oesch et al. (2009), recovers all 5 of the Y-drops reported by Bouwens et al. (2009), and adds a further 29 galaxy candidates, of which 12 lie beyond z = 6.3, and 4 lie beyond z = 7. We also present confidence intervals on our photometric redshift estimates, and caution that acceptable low-redshift (z < 2) solutions exist for 28 out of the 37 galaxies at z > 6.3, and for all 8 galaxy candidates at z > 7.5. Nevertheless, the very highest redshift candidates appear to be strongly clustered in the field. We derive new estimates of the ultraviolet galaxy luminosity function at z = 7 and z = 8. Where our results are most robust, at a characteristic luminosity M(1500) ~ -19.5 (AB), we find that the comoving number density of galaxies declines by a factor of ~ 2.5 between z = 6 and z = 7, and by a further factor of ~ 2 by z = 8. These results suggest that it is difficult for the observed population of high-redshift star-forming galaxies to achieve reionisation by z ~ 6 without a significant contribution from galaxies well below the detection limits, plus alterations in the escape fraction of ionising photons and/or continued vigorous star formation at z > 15.
  • We present a reconstruction of the mass distribution of galaxy cluster Abell 1689 at z = 0.18 using detected strong lensing features from deep HST/ACS observations and extensive ground based spectroscopy. Earlier analyses have reported up to 32 multiply imaged systems in this cluster, of which only 3 were spectroscopically confirmed. In this work, we present a parametric strong lensing mass reconstruction using 24 multiply imaged systems with newly determined spectroscopic redshifts, which is a major step forward in building a robust mass model. In turn, the new spectroscopic data allows a more secure identification of multiply imaged systems. The resultant mass model enables us to reliably predict the redshifts of additional multiply imaged systems for which no spectra are currently available, and to use the location of these systems to further constrain the mass model. In particular, we have detected 5 strong galaxy-galaxy lensing systems just outside the Einstein ring region, further constraining the mass profile. Our strong lensing mass model is consistent with that inferred from our large scale weak lensing analysis derived using CFH12k wide field images. Thanks to a new method for reliably selecting a well defined background lensed galaxy population, we resolve the discrepancy found between the strong and weak lensing mass models reported in earlier work. [ABRIDGED]
  • (abridged) We utilize existing imaging and spectroscopic data for the galaxy clusters MS2137-23 and Abell 383 to present improved measures of the distribution of dark and baryonic material in the clusters' central regions. Our method, based on the combination of gravitational lensing and dynamical data, is uniquely capable of separating the distribution of dark and baryonic components at scales below 100 kpc. We find a variety of strong lensing models fit the available data, including some with dark matter profiles as steep as expected from recent simulations. However, when combined with stellar velocity dispersion data for the brightest member, shallower inner slopes than predicted by numerical simulations are preferred. For Abell 383, the preferred shallow inner slopes are statistically a good fit only when the multiple image position uncertainties associated with our lens model are assumed to be 0\farcs5, to account for unknown substructure. No statistically satisfactory fit was obtained matching both the multiple image lensing data and the velocity dispersion profile of the brightest cluster galaxy in MS2137-23. This suggests that the mass model we are using, which comprises a pseudo-elliptical generalized NFW profile and a brightest cluster galaxy component may inadequately represent the inner cluster regions. This may plausibly arise due to halo triaxiality or by the gravitational interaction of baryons and dark matter in cluster cores. However, the progress made via this detailed study highlights the key role that complementary observations of lensed features and stellar dynamics offer in understanding the interaction between dark and baryonic matter on non-linear scales in the central regions of clusters.
  • We present the results of a study on the properties and evolution of massive (M_* > 10^11 M_0) galaxies at z~0.4 - 2 utilising Keck spectroscopy, near-Infrared Palomar imaging, and Hubble, Chandra, and Spitzer data covering fields targeted by the DEEP2 galaxy spectroscopic survey. Our sample is K band selected based on wide-area NIR imaging from the Palomar Observatory Wide-Field Infrared Survey, which covers 1.53 deg^2 to K_s,vega~20.5. Our major findings include: (i) statistically the mass and number densities of M_* > 10^11 M_0 galaxies show little evolution between z = 0 - 1, and from z ~ 0 - 2 for M_* > 10^11.5 M_0 galaxies. (ii) Using Hubble ACS imaging, we find that M_* > 10^11 selected galaxies show a nearly constant elliptical fraction of ~70-90% at all redshifts. The remaining objects are peculiars possibly undergoing mergers at z > 0.8, while spirals dominate the remainder at lower redshifts. (iii) We find that only a fraction (~60%) of massive galaxies with M_* > 10^11 M_0 are on the red-sequence at z~1.4, while nearly 100% evolve onto it by z~0.4. (iv) By utilising Spitzer MIPS imaging and [OII] line fluxes we argue that M_* > 10^11.5 galaxies have a steeply declining star formation rate density ~(1+z)^6. By examining the contribution of star formation to the evolution of the mass function, as well as the merger history through the CAS parameters, we determine that M_* >10^11 M_0 galaxies undergo on average 0.9^+0.7_-0.5 major mergers at 0.4 < z < 1.4. (v) A high (5%) fraction of all M_* > 10^11 M_0 galaxies are X-ray emitters. Roughly half of these are morphologically distorted ellipticals or peculiars. We compare our results with the Millennium simulation, finding that the number and mass densities of M_* > 10^11.5 M_0 galaxies are under predicted by a factor of > 100.
  • We explore the evolution of the morphology density relation using the COSMOS-ACS survey and previous cluster studies. The Gini parameter measured in a Petrosian aperture is found to be an effective way of selecting early-type galaxies free from systematic effects with redshift. We find galaxies are transformed from late (spiral and irregular) to early (E+S0) type galaxies more rapidly in dense than sparse regions. At a given density, the early-type fraction grows constantly with cosmic time, but the growth rate increases with density as a power law of index $0.29\pm0.02$. However, at densities below 100 galaxies per Mpc$^{2}$ no evolution is found at $z>0.4$. In contrast the star-formation-density relation shows strong evolution at all densities and redshifts, suggesting different physical mechanisms are responsible for the morphological and star formation transformation. We show photometric redshifts can measure local galaxy environment, but the present results are limited by photometric redshift error to densities above $\Sigma=3$ galaxies per Mpc$^{2}$.
  • We have identified a large-scale structure at z~0.73 in the COSMOS field, coherently described by the distribution of galaxy photometric redshifts, an ACS weak-lensing convergence map and the distribution of extended X-ray sources in a mosaic of XMM observations. The main peak seen in these maps corresponds to a rich cluster with Tx= 3.51+0.60/-0.46 keV and Lx=(1.56+/-0.04) x 10^{44} erg/s ([0.1-2.4] keV band). We estimate an X-ray mass within $r500$ corresponding to M500~1.6 x 10^{14} Msun and a total lensing mass (extrapolated by fitting a NFW profile) M(NFW)=(6+/-3) x 10^15 Msun. We use an automated morphological classification of all galaxies brighter than I_AB=24 over the structure area to measure the fraction of early-type objects as a function of local projected density Sigma_10, based on photometric redshifts derived from ground-based deep multi-band photometry. We recover a robust morphology-density relation at this redshift, indicating, for comparable local densities, a smaller fraction of early-type galaxies than today. Interestingly, this difference is less strong at the highest densities and becomes more severe in intermediate environments. We also find, however, local "inversions'' of the observed global relation, possibly driven by the large-scale environment. In particular, we find direct correspondence of a large concentration of disk galaxies to (the colder side of) a possible shock region detected in the X-ray temperature map and surface brightness distribution of the dominant cluster. We interpret this as potential evidence of shock-induced star formation in existing galaxy disks, during the ongoing merger between two sub-clusters.
  • We report the discovery using Hubble Space Telescope imaging and Keck spectroscopy of a very bright, highly magnified (~30*) Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) at z=3.07 in the field of the massive z=0.33 cluster MACSJ2135.2-0102. The system comprises two high-surface brightness arcs with a maximum extent of 3", bracketing a central object which we identify as a massive early-type galaxy at z=0.73. We construct a lens model which reproduces the main features of the system using a combination of a galaxy-scale lens and the foreground cluster. We show that the morphological, spectral and photometric properties of the arcs are consistent with them arising from the lensing of a single ~L* LBG. The most important feature of this system is that the lensing magnification results in an apparent magnitude of r=20.3, making this one of the brightest LBGs known. Such a high magnification provides the opportunity of obtaining very high signal to noise (and potentially spatially resolved) spectroscopy of a high redshift galaxy to study its physical properties. We present initial imaging and spectroscopy demonstrating the basic properties of the system and discuss the opportunities for future observations.
  • Strong nebular emission lines are a sensitive probe of star formation and extinction in galaxies, and the [O II] line detects star forming populations out to z>1. However, star formation rates from emission lines depend on calibration of extinction and the [O II]/H-alpha line ratio, and separating star formation from AGN emission. We use calibrated line luminosities from the DEEP2 survey and Palomar K magnitudes to show that the behavior of emission line ratios depends on galaxy magnitude and color. For galaxies on the blue side of the color bimodality, the vast majority show emission signatures of star formation, and there are strong correlations of extinction and [O II]/H-alpha with restframe H magnitude. The conversion of [O II] to extinction-corrected H-alpha and thus to star formation rate has a significant slope with M_H, 0.23 dex/mag. Red galaxies with emission lines have a much higher scatter in their line ratios, and more than half show AGN signatures. We use 24 micron fluxes from Spitzer/MIPS to demonstrate the differing populations probed by nebular emission and by mid-IR luminosity. Although extinction is correlated with luminosity, 98% of IR-luminous galaxies at z~1 are still detected in the [O II] line. Mid-IR detected galaxies are mostly bright and intermediate color, while fainter, bluer galaxies with high [O II] luminosity are rarely detected at 24 microns.
  • We study intermediate--z SNe Ia using the empirical physical diagrams which enable to learn about those SNe explosions. This information can be very useful to reduce systematic uncertainties of the Hubble diagram of SNe Ia up to high z. The study of the expansion velocities and the measurement of the ratio $\mathcal{R}$(\SiII) allow to subtype those SNe Ia as done for nearby samples. The evolution of this ratio as seen in the diagram $\mathcal{R}$(\SiII)--(t) together with $\mathcal{R}$(\SiII)$_{max}$ versus (B-V)$_{0}$ indicate consistency of the properties at intermediate z compared with local SNe. At intermediate--z, the expansion velocities of Ca II and Si II are similar to the nearby counterparts. This is found in a sample of 6 SNe Ia in the range 0.033$\leq z \leq$0.329 discovered within the {\it International Time Programme} (ITP) of {\it Cosmology and Physics with SNe Ia} during the spring of 2002. Those supernovae were identified using the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. Two SNe Ia at intermediate z were of the cool FAINT type, one being a SN1986G--like object highly reddened. The $\mathcal{R}$(\SiII) ratio as well as subclassification of the SNe Ia beyond templates help to place SNe Ia in their sequence of brightness and to distinguish between reddened and intrinsically red supernovae. This test can be done with very high z SNe Ia and it will help to reduce systematic uncertainties due to extinction by dust. It should allow to map the high-z sample into the nearby one.
  • Shortened abstract: Given a constrained minimization problem, under what conditions does there exist a related, unconstrained problem having the same minimum points? This basic question in global optimization motivates this paper, which answers it from the viewpoint of statistical mechanics. In this context, it reduces to the fundamental question of the equivalence and nonequivalence of ensembles, which is analyzed using the theory of large deviations and the theory of convex functions.
  • This paper is a companion article to our previous paper (J. Stat. Phys. 119, 1283 (2005), cond-mat/0408681), which introduced a generalized canonical ensemble obtained by multiplying the usual Boltzmann weight factor $e^{-\beta H}$ of the canonical ensemble with an exponential factor involving a continuous function $g$ of the Hamiltonian $H$. We provide here a simplified introduction to our previous work, focusing now on a number of physical rather than mathematical aspects of the generalized canonical ensemble. The main result discussed is that, for suitable choices of $g$, the generalized canonical ensemble reproduces, in the thermodynamic limit, all the microcanonical equilibrium properties of the many-body system represented by $H$ even if this system has a nonconcave microcanonical entropy function. This is something that in general the standard ($g=0$) canonical ensemble cannot achieve. Thus a virtue of the generalized canonical ensemble is that it can be made equivalent to the microcanonical ensemble in cases where the canonical ensemble cannot. The case of quadratic $g$-functions is discussed in detail; it leads to the so-called Gaussian ensemble.
  • We present distance measurements to 71 high redshift type Ia supernovae discovered during the first year of the 5-year Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS). These events were detected and their multi-color light-curves measured using the MegaPrime/MegaCam instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), by repeatedly imaging four one-square degree fields in four bands. Follow-up spectroscopy was performed at the VLT, Gemini and Keck telescopes to confirm the nature of the supernovae and to measure their redshift. With this data set, we have built a Hubble diagram extending to z=1, with all distance measurements involving at least two bands. Systematic uncertainties are evaluated making use of the multi-band photometry obtained at CFHT. Cosmological fits to this first year SNLS Hubble diagram give the following results : Omega_M = 0.263 +/- 0.042(stat) +/- 0.032(sys) for a flat LambdaCDM model; and w = -1.023 +/- 0.090(stat) +/- 0.054(sys) for a flat cosmology with constant equation of state w when combined with the constraint from the recent Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations.
  • We discuss a property of our recently introduced generalized canonical ensemble (J. Stat. Phys. 119 (2005) 1283). We show that this ensemble can be used to transform metastable or unstable (nonequilibrium) states of the standard canonical ensemble into stable (equilibrium) states within the generalized canonical ensemble. Equilibrium calculations within the generalized canonical ensemble can thus be used to obtain information about nonequilibrium states in the canonical ensemble.
  • (Abridged) We present deep Keck spectroscopy, using the DEIMOS and LRIS spectrographs, of a large and representative sample of 67 ``Extremely Red Objects'' (EROs) to H=20.5, with I-H>3.0, in three of the Las Campanas Infrared Survey fields. Spectroscopic redshifts are determined for 44 sources, of which only two are contaminating low mass stars. When allowance is made for incompleteness, the spectroscopic redshift distribution closely matches that predicted earlier on the basis of photometric data. Our spectra are of sufficient quality that we can address the important question of the nature and homogeneity of the z>0.8 ERO population. A dominant old stellar population is inferred for 75% of our spectroscopic sample; a higher fraction than that seen in smaller, less-complete samples with broader photometric selection criteria (e.g. R-K). However, only 28% have spectra with no evidence of recent star formation activity, such as would be expected for a strictly passively-evolving population. More than ~30% of our absorption line spectra are of the `E+A' type with prominent Balmer absorption consistent, on average, with mass growth of 5-15% in the past Gyr. We use our spectroscopic redshifts to improve earlier estimates of the spatial clustering of this population as well as to understand the significant field-to-field variation. Our spectroscopy enables us to pinpoint a filamentary structure at z=1.22 in the Chandra Deep Field South. Overall, our study suggests that the bulk of the ERO population is an established population of clustered massive galaxies undergoing intermittent activity consistent with continued growth over the redshift interval 0.8<z<1.6.
  • In this paper we give a complete analysis of the phase transitions in the mean-field Blume-Emery-Griffiths lattice-spin model with respect to the canonical ensemble, showing both a second-order, continuous phase transition and a first-order, discontinuous phase transition for appropriate values of the thermodynamic parameters that define the model. These phase transitions are analyzed both in terms of the empirical measure and the spin per site by studying bifurcation phenomena of the corresponding sets of canonical equilibrium macrostates, which are defined via large deviation principles. Analogous phase transitions with respect to the microcanonical ensemble are also studied via a combination of rigorous analysis and numerical calculations. Finally, probabilistic limit theorems for appropriately scaled values of the total spin are proved with respect to the canonical ensemble. These limit theorems include both central-limit-type theorems when the thermodynamic parameters are not equal to critical values and non-central-limit-type theorems when these parameters equal critical values.
  • Shortened abstract: Microcanonical equilibrium macrostates are characterized as the solutions of a constrained minimization problem, while canonical equilibrium macrostates are characterized as the solutions of a related, unconstrained minimization problem. In Ellis, Haven, and Turkington (J. Stat. Phys. 101, 999, 2000) the problem of ensemble equivalence was completely solved at two separate, but related levels: the level of equilibrium macrostates, which focuses on relationships between the corresponding sets of equilibrium macrostates, and the thermodynamic level, which focuses on when the microcanonical entropy $s$ can be expressed as the Legendre-Fenchel transform of the canonical free energy. The present paper extends the results of Ellis et al. significantly by addressing the following motivational question. Given that the microcanonical ensemble can be nonequivalent with the canonical ensemble, is it possible to replace the canonical ensemble with a generalized canonical ensemble that is equivalent with the microcanonical ensemble? The generalized canonical ensemble that we consider is obtained from the standard canonical ensemble by adding an exponential factor involving a continuous function $g$ of the Hamiltonian. As in the paper by Ellis et al., we analyze the equivalence of the two ensembles at both the level of equilibrium macrostates and the thermodynamic level. A neat but not quite precise statement of the main result in the present paper is that the microcanonical and generalized canonical ensembles are equivalent at the level of equilibrium macrostates if and only if they are equivalent at the thermodynamic level, which is the case if and only if the generalized microcanonical entropy $s-g$ is concave.
  • This short paper presents a nontechnical introduction to the problem of nonequivalent microcanonical and canonical ensembles. Both the thermodynamic and the macrostate levels of definition of nonequivalent ensembles are introduced. The many relationships that exist between these two levels are also explained in simple physical terms.
  • Cosmological N-body simulations predict that dark matter halos should have a universal shape characterized by a steep, cuspy inner profile. Here we report on a spectroscopic study of six clusters each containing a dominant brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) with nearby gravitational arcs. Three clusters have both radial and tangential gravitational arcs, whereas the other three display only tangential arcs. We analyze stellar velocity dispersion data for the BCGs in conjunction with the arc redshifts and lens models to constrain the dark and baryonic mass profiles jointly. For those clusters with radial gravitational arcs we were able to measure precisely the inner slope of the dark matter halo and compare it with that predicted from CDM simulations.