• We have studied the growth of the shell-like radio structure of supernova SN1993J in M81 from September 1993 through October 2003 with very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations at the wavelengths of 3.6, 6, and 18cm. For this purpose, we have developed a method to accurately determine the outer radius (R) of any circularly symmetric compact radio structure like SN1993J. The source structure of SN1993J remains circularly symmetric (with deviations from circularity under 2%) over almost 4000 days. We characterize the decelerated expansion of SN 1993J through approximately day 1500 after explosion with an expansion parameter $m= 0.845\pm0.005$ ($R \propto t^{m}$). However, from that day onwards the expansion is different when observed at 6 and 18cm. Indeed, at 18cm, the expansion can be well characterized by the same $m$ as before day 1500, while at 6cm the expansion appears more decelerated, and is characterized by another expansion parameter, $m_{6}= 0.788\pm0.015$. Therefore, since about day 1500 on, the radio source size has been progressively smaller at 6cm than at 18cm. These findings are in stark contrast to previous reports by other authors on the details of the expansion. In our interpretation the supernova expands with a single expansion parameter, $m= 0.845\pm0.005$, and the 6cm results beyond day 1500 are due to physical effects, perhaps also coupled to instrumental limitations. Two physical effects may be involved: (a) a changing opacity of the ejecta to the 6cm radiation, and (b) a radial decrease of the magnetic field in the emitting region. (Long abstract cut. Please, read full abstract in manuscript).
  • Young radio-loud active galactic nuclei form an important tool to investigate the evolution of extragalactic radio sources. To study the early phases of expanding radio sources, we have constructed CORALZ, a sample of 25 compact ($\theta<2"$) radio sources associated with nearby ($z<0.16$) galaxies. In this paper we determine the morphologies, linear sizes, and put first constraints on the lobe expansion speeds of the sources in the sample. We observed the radio sources from the CORALZ sample with MERLIN at 1.4 GHz or 1.6 GHz, the EVN at 1.6 GHz, and global VLBI at 1.6 GHz and/or 5.0 GHz. Radio maps, morphological classifications, and linear sizes are presented for all sources in the CORALZ sample. We have determined a first upper limit to the expansion velocity of one of the sources, which is remarkably low compared to the brighter GPS sources at higher redshifts, indicating a relation between radio luminosity and expansion speed, in agreement with analytical models. In addition we present further strong evidence that the spectral turnovers in GPS and CSS sources are caused by synchrotron self-absorption (SSA): the CORALZ sources are significantly offset from the well-known correlation between spectral peak frequency and angular size, but this correlation is recovered after correcting for the flux-density dependence, as predicted by SSA theory.
  • We studied the radio structure of high-redshift (z>3) quasars with VSOP at 1.6 and 5 GHz. These sources are the most distant objects ever observed with Space VLBI, at rest-frame frequencies up to ~25 GHz. Here we give an account of the observations and briefly highlight the most interesting cases and results. These observations allowed us, among other things, to estimate the mass of the central black holes powering these quasars, to identify large misalignments between the milli-arcsecond (mas) and sub-mas scale radio structures, and to detect apparent superluminal motion at sub-mas scale.
  • Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies are generally thought to be the young counterparts of classical extended radio sources and live in massive ellipticals. GPS sources are vital for studying the early evolution of radio-loud AGN, the trigger of their nuclear activity, and the importance of feedback in galaxy evolution. We study the Parkes half-Jansky sample of GPS radio galaxies of which now all host galaxies have been identified and 80% has their redshifts determined (0.122 < z < 1.539). Analysis of the absolute magnitudes of the GPS host galaxies show that at z > 1 they are on average a magnitude fainter than classical 3C radio galaxies. This suggests that the AGN in young radio galaxies have not yet much influenced the overall properties of the host galaxy. However their restframe UV luminosities indicate that there is a low level of excess as compared to passive evolution models.
  • LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a next-generation radio telescope that is being built in Northern Europe and expected to be fully operational at the end of this decade. It will operate at frequencies from 15 to 240 MHz (corresponding to wavelengths of 20 to 1.2 m). Its superb sensitivity, high angular resolution, large field of view and flexible spectroscopic capabilities will represent a dramatic improvement over previous facilities at these wavelengths. As such, LOFAR will carry out a broad range of fundamental astrophysical studies. The design of LOFAR has been driven by four fundamental astrophysical applications: (i) The Epoch of Reionisation, (ii) Extragalactic Surveys and their exploitation to study the formation and evolution of clusters, galaxies and black holes, (iii) Transient Sources and their association with high energy objects such as gamma ray bursts, and (iv) Cosmic Ray showers and their exploitation to study the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. In this conference the foreseen LOFAR work on the epoch of reionisation has been covered by de Bruyn and on cosmic ray showers by Falcke. During this contribution we will first present the LOFAR project with an emphasis on the challenges faced when carrying out sensitive imaging at low radio frequencies. Subsequently, we will discuss LOFAR's capabilities to survey the low-frequency radio sky. Main aims for the planned surveys are studies of z>6 radio galaxies, diffuse emission associated with distant clusters and starbursting galaxies at z>2.
  • We present an overview of the occurrence and properties of atomic gas associated with compact radio sources at redshifts up to z=0.85. Searches for HI 21cm absorption were made with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope at UHF-high frequencies (725-1200 MHz). Detections were obtained for 19 of the 57 sources with usable spectra (33%). We have found a large range in line depths, from tau=0.16 to tau<=0.001. There is a substantial variety of line profiles, including Gaussians of less than 10km/s, to more typically 150km/s, as well as irregular and multi-peaked absorption profiles, sometimes spanning several hundred km/s. Assuming uniform coverage of the entire radio source, we obtain column depths of atomic gas between 1e19 and 3.3e21(Tsp/100K)(1/f)cm^(-2). There is evidence for significant gas motions, but in contrast to earlier results at low redshift, there are many sources in which the HI velocity is substantially negative (up to v=-1420km/s) with respect to the optical redshift, suggesting that in these sources the atomic gas, rather than falling into the centre, may be be flowing out, interacting with the jets, or rotating around the nucleus.
  • GPS and CSS radio sources are the objects of choice to investigate the evolution of young radio-loud AGN. Previous investigations, mainly based on number counts and source size distributions, indicate that GPS/CSS sources decrease significantly in radio power when evolving into old, extended objects. We suggest this is preceded by a period of increase in radio luminosity, which lasts as long as the radio source is confined within the core-radius of its host galaxy. We have selected a sample of nearby compact radio sources, unbiased by radio spectrum, to determine their radio luminosity function, size distribution, dynamical ages, and emission line properties in a complete and homogeneous way. First results indicate that the large majority of objects (>80%) exhibit classical GPS/CSS radio spectra, and show structures consistent with the being compact double, or compact symmetric objects. This sample provides and ideal basis to further test and constrain possible evolution scenarios, and to investigate the relation between radio spectra and morphologies, orientation and Doppler boosting in samples of young radio-loud AGN, in an unbiased way.
  • We present and discuss observations made with MERLIN and VLBI at 1.7 and 5 GHz of the two CSS quasars 3C 43 and 3C 298. They show quite different morphologies, the former being a very distorted triple radio source, the latter a small FRII type object. Relativistic effects and structural distortions are discussed. Source ages are evaluated to be of the order of ~10^5 years, therefore 3C 43 and 3C 298 can be considered fairly ''young'' radio sources. Some inference is also derived on the properties of the medium surrounding the radio emitting regions in these sub-galactic objects, whose density could be as low as 10^-3 cm^-3.
  • We have determined the central velocity dispersion and surface brightness profiles for a sample of powerful radio galaxies in the redshift range 0.06<z<0.31, which were selected on the basis of their young radio source. The optical hosts follow the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies, showing that young radio sources reside in normal ellipticals, as do other types of radio galaxies. As young radio sources are relatively straightforward to select and the contributions of the AGN light to the optical spectra are minimal, these objects can readily be used to study the evolution of the fundamental plane of elliptical galaxies out to z=1, independently of optical selection effects. The black hole masses of the objects in our sample have been determined using the tight empirical relation of M_bh with central velocity dispersion, and for literature samples of classical radio galaxies and optically selected ellipticals. Only the optically selected in-active galaxies are found to exhibit a correlation between M_bh and radio luminosity. In contrast, the radio powers of the AGN in the samples do not correlate with M_bh at all, with objects at a given black hole mass ranging over 7 orders of magnitude in radio power. We have been able to tie in the population of powerful radio sources with its parent population of in-active elliptical galaxies: the local black hole mass function has been determined, which was combined with the fraction of radio-loud black holes as function of M_bh, as determined from the optically selected galaxy sample, to derive the local volume-density of radio galaxies and the distribution of their black hole masses. These are shown to be consistent with the local radio luminosity function and the distribution of black hole masses in the radio selected samples [ABBREVIATED]
  • This paper describes the selection of a new southern/equatorial sample of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies, and subsequent optical CCD imaging and spectroscopic observations using the ESO 3.6m telescope. The sample consists of 49 sources with -40<\delta<+15 degrees, |b|>20 degrees, and S(2.7GHz)>0.5 Jy, selected from the Parkes PKSCAT90 survey. About 80% of the sources are optically identified, and about half of the identifications have available redshifts. The R-band Hubble diagram and evolution of the host galaxies of GPS sources are reviewed.
  • We report results of a VSOP (VLBI Space Observatory Programme) observation of a high redshift quasar PKS 2215+020 (z=3.572). The ~1 milliarcsecond resolution image of the quasar reveals a prominent `core-jet' structure on linear scales from 5/h to 300/h pc ($H_0=100*h km/(s*Mpc). The brightness temperatures and sizes of bright features identified in the jet are consistent with emission from relativistic shocks dominated by adiabatic energy losses. The jet is powered by the central black hole with estimated mass of ~4*10^9 solar masses. Comparisons with VLA and ROSAT observations indicate a possible presence of an extended radio/X-ray halo surrounding 2215+020.
  • We present results from observations obtained with ISOPHOT, on board the ISO satellite, of a representative sample of seventeen CSS/GPS radio galaxies and of a control sample of sixteen extended radio galaxies spanning similar ranges in redshift (0.2 <= z <= 0.8) and radio luminosity (P_2.7 GHz >= 10^26 W/Hz). The observations have been performed at lambda = 60, 90, 174 and 200 microns. Seven of the CSS/GPS sources have detections >= 3 sigma at one or more wavelengths, one of which is detected at >= 5 sigma. By co-adding the data we have obtained average flux densities at the four wavelengths. We found no evidence that the FIR luminosities of the CSS/GPS sources are significantly different from those of the extended objects and therefore there is not any support for CSS/GPS sources being objects "frustrated" by an abnormally dense ambient medium. The two samples were then combined, providing FIR information on a new sample of radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We compare this information with what previously known from IRAS and discuss the average properties of radio galaxies in the redshift range 0.2 - 0.8. The FIR emission cannot be accounted for by extrapolation of the synchrotron radio spectrum and we attribute it to thermal dust emission. The average FIR luminosity is >= 6*10^11 L_sun. Over the observed frequency range the infrared spectrum can be described by a power law with spectral index alpha >~1.0 +/- 0.2. Assuming the emission to be due to dust, a range of temperatures is required, from >=80 K to \~25 K. The dust masses required to explain the FIR emission range from 5*10^5 M_sun for the hotter component up to 2*10^8 M_sun for the colder one. (abridged)
  • We report on high sensitivity, spectral line VLBI observations of the HI absorption feature in the radio galaxy NGC4261. Although absorption is only detectable on the most sensitive baseline, it can be unambiguously associated with the counterjet and is interpreted to originate in a thin atomic circumnuclear disk. This structure is probably a continuation of the dusty accretion disk inferred from HST imaging, which could be feeding the massive black hole. HI column densities in front of the counterjet of the order of 10^{21}(T_sp/100 K) cm^{-2} are derived, consistent with X-ray data and VLBI scale free-free absorption. The data presented here are the result of the first scientific project processed on the new EVN MkIV data processor.
  • We present multi-frequency VLBA+VLA observations of SS433 at 1.6, 5 and 15 GHz. These observations provide the highest angular resolution radio spectral index maps ever made for this object. Motion of the components of SS433 during the observation is detected. In addition to the usual VLBI jet structure, we detect two radio components in the system at an anomalous position angle. These newly discovered radio emitting regions might be related to a wind-like equatorial outflow or to an extension of the accretion disk. We show that the radio core component is bifurcated with a clear gap between the eastern and western wings of emission. Modelfitting of the precessing jets and the moving knots of SS433 shows that the kinematic centre -- i.e. the binary -- is in the gap between the western and eastern radio core components. Spectral properties and observed core position shifts suggest that we see a combined effect of synchrotron self-absorption and external free-free absorption in the innermost AU-scale region of the source. The spatial distribution of the ionized matter is probably not spherically symmetric around the binary, but could be disk-like.
  • We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources drawn from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS). Redshifts have been determined for 19 (40%) of the objects. The optical spectra of the GPS sources identified with low redshift galaxies show deep stellar absorption features. This confirms previous suggestions that their optical light is not significantly contaminated by AGN-related emission, but is dominated by a population of old (>9 Gyr) and metal-rich (>0.2 [Fe/H]) stars, justifying the use of these (probably) young radio sources as probes of galaxy evolution. The optical spectra of GPS sources identified with quasars are indistinguishable from those of flat spectrum quasars, and clearly different from the spectra of Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) quasars. The redshift distribution of the GPS quasars in our radio-faint sample is comparable to that of the bright samples presented in the literature, peaking at z ~ 2-3. It is unlikely that a significant population of low redshift GPS quasars is missed due to selection effects in our sample. We therefore claim that there is a genuine difference between the redshift distributions of GPS galaxies and quasars, which, because it is present in both the radio-faint and bright samples, can not be due to a redshift-luminosity degeneracy. It is therefore unlikely that the GPS quasars and galaxies are unified by orientation, unless the quasar opening angle is a strong function of redshift. We suggest that the GPS quasars and galaxies are unrelated populations and just happen to have identical observed radio-spectral properties, and hypothesise that GPS quasars are a sub-class of flat spectrum quasars.
  • GPS sources are the objects of choice to study the initial evolution of extragalactic radio sources, since it is most likely that they are the young counterparts of large scale radio sources. Correlations found between their peak frequency, peak flux density and angular size provide strong evidence that synchrotron self absorption is the cause of the spectral turnovers, and indicate that young radio sources evolve in a self-similar way. The difference in redshift distribution between young and old radio sources must be due to a difference in slope of their luminosity functions, and we argue that this slope is strongly affected by the luminosity evolution of the individual sources. A luminosity evolution scenario is proposed in which GPS sources increase in luminosity and large scale radio sources decrease in luminosity with time. It is shown that such a scenario agrees with the local luminosity function of GPS galaxies.
  • A sample of 47 faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources selected from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS, Rengelink et al. 1997), has been imaged in the optical and near infrared, resulting in an identification fraction of 87%. The R-I and R-K colours of the faint optical counterparts are as expected for passively evolving elliptical galaxies, assuming that they follow the R band Hubble diagram as determined for radio-bright GPS galaxies. We have found evidence that the radio spectral properties of the GPS quasars are different from those of GPS galaxies: The observed distribution of radio spectral peak frequencies for GPS sources optically identified with bright stellar objects (presumably quasars) is shifted compared with GPS sources identified with faint or extended optical objects (presumably galaxies), in the sense that a GPS quasar is likely to have a higher peak frequency than a GPS galaxy. This means that the true peak frequency distribution is different for the GPS galaxies and quasars, because the sample selection effects are independent of optical identification. The correlation between peak frequency and redshift as has been suggested for bright sources has not been found in this sample; no correlation exists between R magnitude (and therefore redshift) and peak frequency for the GPS galaxies. We therefore believe that the claimed correlation is actually caused by the dependence of the peak frequency on optical host, because the GPS galaxies are in general at lower redshifts than the quasars. The difference in the peak frequency distributions of the GPS galaxies and quasars is further evidence against the hypothesis that they form a single class of object.