• We report the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the HATSouth survey. HATS-9b orbits an old (10.8 $\pm$ 1.5 Gyr) V=13.3 G dwarf star, with a period P = 1.9153 d. The host star has a mass of 1.03 M$_{\odot}$, radius of 1.503 R$_\odot$ and effective temperature 5366 $\pm$ 70 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.837 M$_J$, and radius of 1.065 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.85 g cm$^{-3}$ . HATS-10b orbits a V=13.1 G dwarf star, with a period P = 3.3128 d. The host star has a mass of 1.1 M$_\odot$, radius of 1.11 R$_\odot$ and effective temperature 5880 $\pm$ 120 K. The planetary companion has a mass of 0.53 M$_J$, and radius of 0.97 R$_J$ yielding a mean density of 0.7 g cm$^{-3}$ . Both planets are compact in comparison with planets receiving similar irradiation from their host stars, and lie in the nominal coordinates of Field 7 of K2 but only HATS-9b falls on working silicon. Future characterisation of HATS-9b with the exquisite photometric precision of the Kepler telescope may provide measurements of its reflected light signature.
  • We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-4b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V=13.46 mag G star. HATS-4b has a period of P = 2.5167 d, mass of Mp = 1.32 Mj, radius of Rp = 1.02 Rj and density of rho_p = 1.55 +- 0.16 g/cm^3 ~ 1.24 rhoj. The host star has a mass of 1.00 Msun, a radius of 0.92 Rsun and a very high metallicity [Fe/H]= 0.43 +- 0.08. HATS-4b is among the densest known planets with masses between 1-2 Mj and is thus likely to have a significant content of heavy elements of the order of 75 Mearth. In this paper we present the data reduction, radial velocity measurement and stellar classification techniques adopted by the HATSouth survey for the CORALIE spectrograph. We also detail a technique to estimate simultaneously vsini and macroturbulence using high resolution spectra.
  • HD 15082 (WASP-33) is the hottest and fastest rotating star known to harbor a transiting extrasolar planet (WASP-33b). The lack of high precision radial velocity (RV) data stresses the need for precise light curve analysis and gathering further RV data. By using available photometric and RV data, we perform a blend analysis, compute more accurate system parameters, confine the planetary mass and attempt to cast light on the observed transit anomalies. We combine the original HATNet observations and various followup data to jointly analyze the signal content and extract the transit component and use our RV data to aid the global parameter determination. The blend analysis of the combination of multicolor light curves yields the first independent confirmation of the planetary nature of WASP-33b. We clearly identify three frequency components in the 15-21 1/day regime with amplitudes 7-5 mmag. These frequencies correspond to the delta Scuti-type pulsation of the host star. None of these pulsation frequencies or their low-order linear combinations are in close resonance with the orbital frequency. We show that these pulsation components explain some but not all of the observed transit anomalies. The grand-averaged transit light curve shows that there is a ~1.5 mmag brightening shortly after the planet passes the mid-transit phase. Although the duration and amplitude of this brightening varies, it is visible even through the direct inspections of the individual transit events (some 40-60% of the followup light curves show this phenomenon). We suggest that the most likely explanation of this feature is the presence of a well-populated spot belt which is highly inclined to the orbital plane. This geometry is consistent with the inference from the spectroscopic anomalies. Finally, we constrain the planetary mass to M_p=3.27+/-0.73 M_J by using our RV data collected by the TRES spectrograph.
  • We present radial-velocity measurements obtained with the ELODIE and AFOE spectrographs for GJ 777 A (HD 190360), a metal-rich ([Fe/H]=0.25) nearby (d=15.9 pc) star in a stellar binary system. A long-period low radial-velocity amplitude variation is detected revealing the presence of a Jovian planetary companion. Some of the orbital elements remain weakly constrained because of the smallness of the signal compared to our instrumental precision. The detailed orbital shape is therefore not well established. We present our best fitted orbital solution: an eccentric (e=0.48) 10.7--year orbit. The minimum mass of the companion is 1.33 M_Jup.
  • ESPI has been proposed for direct imaging and spectral analysis of giant planets orbiting solar-type stars. ESPI extends the concept suggested by Nisenson and Papaliolios (2001) for a square aperture apodized telescope that has sufficient dynamic range to directly detect exo-planets. With a 1.5 M square mirror, ESPI can deliver high dynamic range imagery as close as 0.3 arcseconds to bright sources, permitting a sensitive search for exoplanets around nearby stars and a study of their characteristics in reflected light.
  • HD 89744 is an F7 V star with mass 1.4 M, effective temperature 6166 K, age 2.0 Gy and metallicity [Fe/H]= 0.18. The radial velocity of the star has been monitored with the AFOE spectrograph at the Whipple Observatory since 1996, and evidence has been found for a low mass companion. The data were complemented by additional data from the Hamilton spectrograph at Lick Observatory during the companion's periastron passage in fall 1999. As a result, we have determined the star's orbital wobble to have period P = 256 d, orbital amplitude K = 257 m/s, and eccentricity e = 0.7. From the stellar mass we infer that the companion has minimum mass m2 sin i = 7.2 MJup in an orbit with semi-major axis a2 = 0.88 AU. The eccentricity of the orbit, among the highest known for extra-solar planets, continues the trend that extra-solar planets with semi-major axes greater than about 0.15 AU tend to have much higher eccentricities than are found in our solar system. The high metallicity of the parent star reinforces the trend that parent stars of extra-solar planets tend to have high metallicity