• Burn-UD is a hydrodynamic combustion code used to model the phase transition of hadronic to quark matter with particular application to the interior of neutron stars. Burn-UD models the flame micro-physics for different equations of state (EoS) on both sides of the interface, i.e. for both the ash (up-down-strange quark phase) and the fuel (up-down quark phase). It also allows the user to explore strange quark seeding produced by different processes including DM annihilation inside neutron stars. The simulations provide a physical window to diagnose whether the combustion process will simmer quietly and slowly, lead to a transition from deflagration to detonation or a (quark) core-collapse explosion. Such an energetic phase transition (a Quark-Nova) would have consequences in high-energy astrophysics and could aid in our understanding of many still enigmatic astrophysical transients. Furthermore, having a precise understanding of the phase transition dynamics for different EoSs could aid further in constraining the nature of the non-perturbative regimes of QCD in general. We hope that Burn-UD will evolve into a platform/software to be used and shared by the QCD community exploring the phases of Quark Matter and astrophysicists working on Compact Stars.
  • In 1982, Monique and Francois Spite discovered that the 7Li abundance in the atmosphere of old metal-poor dwarf stars in the galactic halo was independent of metallicity and temperature. Since then, 7Li abundance in the Universe has become a subject of intrigue, because there is less of it in Population II dwarf stars (by a factor of 3) than standard big bang nucleosynthesis predicts. Here we show how quark-novae (QNe) occurring in the wake of Pop. III stars, can elegantly produce an A(Li) ~ 2.2 Lithium plateau in Pop. II (low-mass) stars formed in the pristine cloud swept up by the mixed SN+QN ejecta. We also find an increase in the scatter as well as an eventual drop in A(Li) below the Spite plateau values for very low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -3) in excellent agreement with observations. We propose a solution to the discrepancy between the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis 7Li abundance and the Spite plateau and list some implications and predictions of our model.
  • The genesis and chemical patterns of the metal poor stars in the galactic halo remains an open question. Current models do not seem to give a satisfactory explanation for the observed abundances of Lithium in the galactic metal-poor stars and the existence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) and Nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor (NEMP) stars. In order to deal with some of these theoretical issues, we suggest an alternative explanation, where some of the Pop. III SNe are followed by the detonation of their neutron stars (Quark-Novae; QNe). In QNe occurring a few days to a few weeks following the preceding SN explosion, the neutron-rich relativistic QN ejecta leads to spallation of 56Ni processed in the ejecta of the preceding SN explosion and thus to "iron/metal impoverishment" of the primordial gas swept by the combined SN+QN ejecta. We show that the generation of stars formed from fragmentation of pristine clouds swept-up by the combined SN+QN ejecta acquire a metallicity with -7.5 < Fe/H] < -1.5 for dual explosions with 2 < t_delay (days) < 30. Spallation leads to the depletion of 56Ni and formation of sub-Ni elements such as Ti, V, Cr, and Mn providing a reasonable account of the trends observed in galactic halo metal-poor stars. CEMP stars form in dual explosions with short delays (t_delay < 5 days). These lead to important destruction of 56Ni (and thus to a drastic reduction of the amount of Fe in the swept up cloud) while preserving the carbon processed in the outer layers of the SN ejecta. Lithium is produced from the interaction of the neutron-rich QN ejecta with the outer (oxygen-rich) layers of the SN ejecta. A Lithium plateau with 2 < A(Li) < 2.4 can be produced in our model as well as a corresponding 6Li plateau with 6Li/7Li < 0.3.
  • We present new determination of the birth rate of AXPs and SGRS and their associated SNRs. We find a high birth rate of 1/(500 yr) for AXPs/SGRs and 1/(1700 yr) for associated SNRs. These high rates suggest that all massive stars (greater than ~ 25 M_sun) give rise to remnants with magnetar-like fields. Recent observations indicate that fossil fields cannot explain such high fields in the progenitor stars. Dynamo mechanisms during the birth of the neutron stars require spin rates much faster than either observations or theory indicate. Here, we propose the neutron stars form with normal (~ 10^{12} G) magnetic fields, which are then amplified to 10^{14}-10^{15} G after a delay of a few hundred years. The amplification is speculated to be a consequence of color ferromagnetism and occurs after the neutron star core reaches quark-deconfinement density. This delayed amplification alleviates many difficulties in interpreting simultaneously the high birth rate and high magnetic fields of AXPs/SGRs and their link to massive stars.
  • In simulations of (magnetized-)fluid dynamics in physics and astrophysics, the visualization techniques are so frequently applied to analyse data that they have become a fundamental part of the research. Data produced is often a multi-dimensional set with several physical quantities, that are usually complex to manage and analyse. JETGET is a visualization and analysis tool we developed for accessing data stored in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) and ASCII files. Although JETGET has been optimized to handle data output from jet simulations using the Zeus code from NCSA, it is also capable of analysing other data output from simulations using other codes. JETGET can select variables from the data files, render both two- and three-dimensional graphics and analyse and plot important physical quantities. Graphics can be saved in encapsulated Postscript, JPEG, VRML or saved into an MPEG for later visualization and/or presentations. An example of use of JETGET in analysing a 3-dimensional simulation of jets emanating from accretion disks surrounding a protostar is shown. The strength of JETGET in extracting the physics underlying such phenomena is demonstrated as well as its capabilities in visualizing the 3-dimensional features of the simulated magneto-hydrodynamic jets. The JETGET tool is written in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and uses a graphical user interface to manipulate the data. The tool was developed on a LINUX platform and can be run on any platform that supports IDL. JETGET can be downloaded (including more information about its utilities) from http://www.capca.ucalgary.ca/software.
  • We discuss the Skyrme model for strong interactions and the concept of a Skyrmion fluid. The corresponding compact objects, namely Skyrmion stars, constructed from the equation of state describing such a fluid are presented and compared to models of neutron stars based on modern equation of states. We suggest plausible Skyrmion star candidates in the 4U 1636-53 and 4U 1820-30 low mass X-ray binary systems where the suggested masses of the accreting compact companion (\sim 2.0M_{\odot}) remain a challenge for neutron star models.