• Crosslinked semi-flexible and flexible filaments that are actively deformed by molecular motors occur in various natural settings, such as the ordered eukaryotic flagellum, and the disordered cytoskeleton. The deformation of these composite systems is driven by active motor forces and resisted by passive filament elasticity, and structural constraints due to permanent cross-links. Using a mean field theory for a one-dimensional ordered system, we show that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a characteristic persistence length scale over which active strain decays. This decay length is set by the ability of motors to respond to combination of the weak extensional elasticity, passive shear resistance and the viscoelastic properties of the motor assembly, and generalizes the notion of persistence in purely thermal filaments to active systems.
  • Long, elastic filaments cross-linked and deformed by active molecular motors occur in various natural settings. The overall macroscopic mechanical response of such a composite network depends on the coupling between the active and the passive properties of the underlying constituents and nonlocal interactions between different parts of the composite. In a simple one dimensional system, using a mean field model, it has been shown that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a persistence length scale over which strain decays. Here we study a similar system, in the complementary limit of strong noise and moderate extensibility, using Brownian multi-particle collision dynamics-based numerical simulations that includes the coupling between motor kinetics and local filament extensibility. While the numerical model shows deviations from the mean field predictions due to the presence of strong active noise caused by the variations in individual motor activity, several qualitative features are still retained. Specifically, for fixed motor attachment and detachment rates, the decay is length is set by the ratio of the passive elasticity to the active shear resistance generated by attached motors. Our study generalizes the notion of persistence in passive thermal systems to actively driven systems with testable predictions.
  • Eukaryotic flagella are active structures with a complex architecture of microtubules, motor proteins and elastic links. They are capable of whiplike motions driven by motors sliding along filaments that are themselves constrained at an end. Here, we show that active, self-propelled particles that are connected together to form a single chain that is anchored at one end can produce the graceful beating motions of flagella. We use a combination of numerical simulations, scaling analysis and mean field continuum elastic theory to demarcate the phase diagram for this type of oscillatory motion as a function of the filament length, passive elasticity, propulsion force and longitudinal persistence of propulsion directions. Depending on the nature of the anchoring, we show that filament either undergoes flagella-like beating or assumes a steadily rotating coiled conformation. Our system is simpler than its biological inspiration, and thus could be experimentally realized using a variety of self-propelled particles.
  • The conformations of semiflexible (bio)polymers are studied in flow through geometrically structured microchannels. Using mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations, we show that the polymer undergoes a rod-to-helix transition as it moves from the narrow high-velocity region into the wide low-velocity region of the channel. The transient helix formation is the result of a non-equilibrium and non-stationary buckling transition of the semiflexible polymer, which is subjected to a compressive force originating from the fluid-velocity variation in the channel. The helix properties depend on the diameter ratio of the channel, the polymer bending rigidity, and the flow strength.
  • The flow behavior of a semiflexible polymer in microchannels is studied using Multiparticle Collision Dynamics (MPC), a particle-based hydrodynamic simulation technique. Conformations, distributions, and radial cross-streamline migration are investigated for various bending rigidities, with persistence lengths Lp in the range 0.5 < Lp/Lr < 30. The flow behavior is governed by the competition between a hydrodynamic lift force and steric wall-repulsion, which lead to migration away from the wall, and a locally varying flow-induced orientation, which drives polymer away from the channel center and towards the wall. The different dependencies of these effects on the polymer bending rigidity and the flow velocity results in a complex dynamical behavior. However, a generic effect is the appearance of a maximum in the monomer and the center-of-mass distributions, which occurs in the channel center for small flow velocities, but moves off-center at higher velocities.
  • The non-equilibrium structural and dynamical properties of a semiflexible polymer confined in a cylindrical microchannel and exposed to a Poiseuille flow is studied by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. For a polymer with a length half of its persistence length, large variations in orientation and conformations are found as a function of radial distance and flow strength. In particular, the polymer exhibits U-shaped conformations near the channel center. Hydrodynamic interactions lead to strong cross-streamline migration. Outward migration is governed by the polymer orientation and the corresponding anisotropy in its diffusivity. Strong tumbling motion is observed, with a tumbling time which exhibits the same dependence on Peclet number as a polymer in shear flow.