• Most of the visible matter in the Universe is ionized, so that cosmic magnetic fields are quite easy to generate and due to the lack of magnetic monopoles hard to destroy. Magnetic fields have been measured in or around practically all celestial objects, either by in-situ measurements of spacecrafts or by the electromagnetic radiation of embedded cosmic rays, gas, or dust. The Earth, the Sun, solar planets, stars, pulsars, the Milky Way, nearby galaxies, more distant (radio) galaxies, quasars, and even intergalactic space in clusters of galaxies have significant magnetic fields, and even larger volumes of the Universe may be permeated by 'dark' magnetic fields. Information on cosmic magnetic fields has increased enormously as the result of the rapid development of observational methods, especially in radio astronomy. In the Milky Way, a wealth of magnetic phenomena was discovered that are only partly related to objects visible in other spectral ranges. The large-scale structure of the Milky Way's magnetic field is still under debate. The available data for external galaxies can well be explained by field amplification and ordering via the dynamo mechanism. The measured field strengths and the similarity of field patterns and flow patterns of the diffuse ionized gas give strong indication that galactic magnetic fields are dynamically important. They may affect the formation of spiral arms, outflows, and the general evolution of galaxies. In spite of our increasing knowledge on magnetic fields, many important questions on the origin and evolution of magnetic fields, like their first occurrence in young galaxies, or the existence of large-scale intergalactic fields remained unanswered. The present upgrades of existing instruments and several radio astronomy projects have defined cosmic magnetism as one of their key science projects.
  • We analyze the application of star formation rate (SFR) calibrations using H$\alpha$ and 22 micron infrared imaging data in predicting the thermal radio component for a test sample of 3 edge-on galaxies (NGC 891, NGC 3044, and NGC 4631) in the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies -- an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES). We use a mixture of H$\alpha$ and 24 micron calibration from Calzetti et al. (2007), and a linear 22 micron only calibration from Jarrett et al. (2013) on the test sample. We apply these relations on a pixel-to-pixel basis to create thermal prediction maps in the two CHANG-ES bands: L- and C-band (1.5 GHz and 6.0 GHz, respectively). We analyze the resulting non-thermal spectral index maps, and find a characteristic steepening of the non-thermal spectral index with vertical distance from the disk after application of all methods. We find possible evidence of extinction in the 22 micron data as compared to 70 micron Spitzer Multband Imaging Photometer (MIPS) imaging in NGC 891. We analyze a larger sample of edge-on and face-on galaxy 25 micron to 100 micron flux ratios, and find that the ratios for edge-ons are systematically lower by a factor of 1.36, a result we attribute to excess extinction in the mid-IR in edge-ons. We introduce a new calibration for correcting the H$\alpha$ luminosity for dust when galaxies are edge-on or very dusty.
  • The vertical halo scale height is a crucial parameter to understand the transport of cosmic-ray electrons (CRE) and their energy loss mechanisms in spiral galaxies. Until now, the radio scale height could only be determined for a few edge-on galaxies because of missing sensitivity at high resolution. We developed a sophisticated method for the scale height determination of edge-on galaxies. With this we determined the scale heights and radial scale lengths for a sample of 13 galaxies from the CHANG-ES radio continuum survey in two frequency bands. The sample average value for the radio scale heights of the halo are 1.1 +/- 0.3kpc in C-band and 1.4 +/- 0.7kpc in L-band. From the frequency dependence analysis of the halo scale heights we found that the wind velocities (estimated using the adiabatic loss time) are above the escape velocity. We found that the halo scale heights increase linearly with the radio diameters. In order to exclude the diameter dependence, we defined a normalized scale height which is quite similar for all sample galaxies at both frequency bands and does not depend on the star formation rate or the magnetic field strength. However, the normalized scale height shows a tight anticorrelation with the mass surface density. The sample galaxies with smaller scale lengths are more spherical in the radio emission, while those with larger scale lengths are flatter. The radio scale height depends mainly on the radio diameter of the galaxy. The sample galaxies are consistent with an escape-dominated radio halo with convective cosmic ray propagation, indicating that galactic winds are a widespread phenomenon in spiral galaxies. While a higher star formation rate or star formation surface density does not lead to a higher wind velocity, we deceleration of CRE outflow, e.g. a lowering of the wind velocity from the galactic disk.
  • The venerable NOD2 data reduction software package for single-dish radio continuum observations, developed for use at the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope, has been successfully applied over many decades. Modern computing facilities call for a new design. We aim to develop an interactive software tool with a graphical user interface (GUI) for the reduction of single-dish radio continuum maps. Special effort is given on the reduction of distortions along the scanning direction (scanning effects) by combining maps scanned in orthogonal directions or dual- or multiple-horn observations that need to be processed in a restoration procedure. The package should also process polarisation data and offer the possibility to include special tasks written by the individual user. Based on the ideas of the NOD2 package we developed NOD3, which includes all necessary tasks from the raw maps to the final maps in total intensity and linear polarisation. Furthermore, plot routines and several methods for map analysis are available. The NOD3 package is written in Python which allows to extend the package by additional tasks. The required data format for the input maps is FITS. NOD3 is a sophisticated tool to process and analyse maps from single-dish observations that are affected by 'scanning effects' due to clouds, receiver instabilities, or radio-frequency interference (RFI). The 'basket-weaving' tool combines orthogonally scanned maps to a final map that is almost free of scanning effects. The new restoration tool for dual-beam observations reduces the noise by a factor of about two compared to the NOD2 version. Combining single-dish with interferometer data in the map plane ensures the full recovery of the total flux density.
  • We present the highest sensitivity and angular resolution study at 0.32 GHz of the dwarf irregular galaxy IC\,10, observed using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, probing $\sim45$ pc spatial scales. We find the galaxy-averaged radio continuum spectrum to be relatively flat, with a spectral index $\alpha = -0.34\pm0.01$ ($S_\nu \propto \nu^\alpha$), mainly due to a high contribution from free--free emission. At 0.32 GHz, some of the H{\sc ii} regions show evidence of free--free absorption as they become optically thick below $\sim0.41$ GHz with corresponding free electron densities of $\sim11-22~\rm cm^{-3}$. After removing the free--free emission, we studied the radio--infrared relations on 55, 110 and 165 pc spatial scales. We find that on all scales the non-thermal emission at 0.32 and 6.2 GHz correlates better with far-infrared (FIR) emission at $70\,\mu$m than mid-infrared emission at $24\,\mu$m. The dispersion of the radio--FIR relation arises due to variations in both magnetic field and dust temperature, and decreases systematically with increasing spatial scale. The effect of cosmic ray transport is negligible as cosmic ray electrons were only injected $\lesssim5$ Myr ago. The average magnetic field strength ($B$) of $12~\mu$G in the disc is comparable to that of large star-forming galaxies. The local magnetic field is strongly correlated with local star formation rate ($\mathrm{SFR}$) as $B \propto \mathrm{SFR}^{0.35\pm0.03}$, indicating a star-burst driven fluctuation dynamo to be efficient ($\sim10$ per cent) in amplifying the field in IC\,10. The high spatial resolution observations presented here suggest that the high efficiency of magnetic field amplification and strong coupling with SFR likely sets up the radio--FIR correlation in cosmologically young galaxies.
  • Computing polarised intensities from noisy data in Stokes U and Q suffers from a positive bias that should be suppressed. To develop a correction method that, when applied to maps, should provide a distribution of polarised intensity that closely follows the signal from the source. We propose a new method to suppress the bias by estimating the polarisation angle of the source signal in a noisy environment with help of a modified median filter. We then determine the polarised intensity, including the noise, by projection of the observed values of Stokes U and Q onto the direction of this polarisation angle. We show that our new method represents the true signal very well. If the noise distribution in the maps of U and Q is Gaussian, then in the corrected map of polarised intensity it is also Gaussian. Smoothing to larger Gaussian beamsizes, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, can be done directly with our method in the map of the polarised intensity. Our method also works in case of non-Gaussian noise distributions. The maps of the corrected polarised intensities and polarisation angles are reliable even in regions with weak signals and provide integrated flux densities and degrees of polarisation without the cumulative effect of the bias, which especially affects faint sources. Features at low intensity levels like 'depolarisation canals' are smoother than in the maps using the previous methods, which has broader implications, for example on the interpretation of interstellar turbulence.
  • We observed three radio relics in galaxy clusters and one radio relic candidate at 4.85 and 8.35 GHz in total emission and linearly polarized emission with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope and one radio relic candidate in X-rays with the Chandra telescope. The radio spectra of the integrated emission below 8.35 GHz can be well fitted by single power laws for all four relics. The flat spectra (spectral indices of 0.9 and 1.0) for the "Sausage" relic in cluster CIZA J2242+53 and the "Toothbrush" relic in cluster 1RXS 06+42 indicate that models describing the origin of relics have to include effects beyond the assumptions of diffuse shock acceleration. The spectra of the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and in Abell 1612 are steep, as expected from weak shocks (Mach number $\approx 2.4$). We find polarization degrees of more than 50 % in the two prominent Mpc-sized radio relics, the Sausage and the Toothbrush. The high degree of polarization indicates that the magnetic field vectors are almost perfectly aligned along the relic structure. The polarization degrees correspond to Mach numbers of $>2.2$. Polarized emission is also detected in the radio relics in ZwCl 0008+52 and, for the first time, in Abell 1612. Abell 1612 shows a complex X-ray surface brightness distribution, indicating a recent major merger. No Faraday depolarization is detected between 4.85 GHz and 8.35 GHz, except for one component of the Toothbrush relic. Faraday depolarization between 1.38 GHz and 8.35 GHz varies with distance from the center of the host cluster 1RXS 06+42, which can be explained by a decrease in electron density and/or in strength of a turbulent magnetic field. Faraday rotation measures show large-scale gradients along the relics, which cannot be explained by variations in the Milky Way foreground. Large-scale regular fields appear to be present in intergalactic space around galaxy clusters.
  • We report on C-band (5 - 7 GHz) observations of the galaxy, NGC~2992, from the CHANG-ES sample. This galaxy displays an embedded nuclear double-lobed radio morphology within its spiral disk, as revealed in linearly polarized emission but {\it not} in total intensity emission. The radio lobes are kpc-sized, similar to what has been observed in the past for other Seyfert galaxies, and show ordered magnetic fields. NGC~2992 has shown previous evidence for AGN-related activity, but not the linearly polarized radio features that we present here. We draw attention to this galaxy as the first clear example (and prototype) of bipolar radio outflow that is revealed in linearly polarized emission only. Such polarization observations, which are unobscured by dust, provide a new tool for uncovering hidden weak AGN activity which may otherwise be masked by brighter unpolarized emission within which it is embedded. The radio lobes observed in NGC~2992 are interacting with the surrounding interstellar medium and offer new opportunities to investigate the interactions between nuclear outflows and the ISM in nearby galaxies. We also compare the radio emission with a new CHANDRA X-ray image of this galaxy. A new CHANG-ES image of NGC~3079 is also briefly shown as another example as to how much more obvious radio lobes appear in linear polarization as opposed to total intensity.
  • There is evidence that magnetized material along the line of sight to distant quasars is detectable in the polarization properties of the background sources. The polarization properties appear to be correlated with the presence of intervening MgII absorption, which is thought to arise in outflowing material from star forming galaxies. In order to investigate this further, we have obtained high spectral resolution polarization measurements, with the VLA and ATCA, of a set of 49 unresolved quasars for which we have high quality optical spectra. These enable us to produce a Faraday Depth spectrum for each source, using Rotation Measure Synthesis. Our new independent radio data confirms that interveners are strongly associated with depolarization. We characterize the complexity of the Faraday Depth spectrum using a number of parameters and show how these are related, or not, to the depolarization and to the presence of MgII absorption along the line of sight. We argue that complexity and structure in the Faraday Depth distribution likely arise from both intervening material and intrinsically to the background source and attempt to separate these. We find that the strong radio depolarization effects associated with intervening material at redshifts out to $z \approx 1$ arise from inhomogeneous Faraday screens producing a dispersion in Rotation Measure across individual sources of around 10~rad/m$^2$. This is likely produced by disordered fields with strengths of at least $3\;\mu$G.
  • The far-infrared - radio correlation connects star formation and magnetic fields in galaxies, and has been confirmed over a large range of far-infrared luminosities. Recent investigations indicate that it may even hold in the regime of local dwarf galaxies, and we explore here the expected behavior in the regime of star formation surface densities below 0.1 M_sun kpc^{-2} yr^{-1}. We derive two conditions that can be particularly relevant for inducing a change in the expected correlation: a critical star formation surface density to maintain the correlation between star formation rate and the magnetic field, and a critical star formation surface density below which cosmic ray diffusion losses dominate over their injection via supernova explosions. For rotation periods shorter than 1.5x10^7 (H/kpc)^2 yrs, with H the scale height of the disk, the first correlation will break down before diffusion losses are relevant, as higher star formation rates are required to maintain the correlation between star formation rate and magnetic field strength. For high star formation surface densities Sigma_SFR, we derive a characteristic scaling of the non-thermal radio to the far-infrared / infrared emission with Sigma_SFR^{1/3}, corresponding to a scaling of the non-thermal radio luminosity L_s with the infrared luminosity L_{th} as L_{th}^{4/3}. The latter is expected to change when the above processes are no longer steadily maintained. In the regime of long rotation periods, we expect a transition towards a steeper scaling with Sigma_SFR^{2/3}, implying L_s~L_th^{5/3}, while the regime of fast rotation is expected to show a considerably enhanced scatter. These scaling relations explain the increasing thermal fraction of the radio emission observed within local dwarfs, and can be tested with future observations by the SKA and its precursor radio telescopes.
  • We extend the description of the isotropic and anisotropic random component of the small-scale magnetic field within the existing magnetic field model of the Milky Way from Jansson&Farrar, by including random realizations of the small-scale component. Using a magnetic-field power spectrum with Gaussian random fields, the NE2001 model for the thermal electrons and the Galactic cosmic-ray electron distribution from the current GALPROP model we derive full-sky maps for the total and polarized synchrotron intensity as well as the Faraday rotation-measure distribution. While previous work assumed that small-scale fluctuations average out along the line-of-sight or which only computed ensemble averages of random fields, we show that these fluctuations need to be carefully taken into account. Comparing with observational data we obtain not only good agreement with 408 MHz total and WMAP7 22 GHz polarized intensity emission maps, but also an improved agreement with Galactic foreground rotation-measure maps and power spectra, whose amplitude and shape strongly depend on the parameters of the random field. We demonstrate that a correlation length of ~220pc (50pc being a 5\sigma lower limit) is needed to match the slope of the observed power spectrum of Galactic foreground rotation-measure maps. Using multiple realizations allows us also to infer errors on individual observables. We find that previously-used amplitudes for random and anisotropic random magnetic field components need to be rescaled by factors of ~0.3 and 0.6 to account for the new small-scale contributions. Our model predicts a rotation measure of -2.8\pm7.1 rad/m^2 and 4.4\pm11.0 rad/m^2 for the north and south Galactic poles respectively, in good agreement with observations. Applying our model to deflections of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays we infer a mean deflection of ~3.5\pm1.1 degree for 60 EeV protons arriving from CenA.
  • We investigate the effects of ram pressure on the ordered magnetic field of a galaxy hosting a radio halo and strong nuclear outflows. New radio images in total and polarized intensity of the edge-on Virgo galaxy NGC\,4388 were obtained within the CHANG-ES EVLA project. The unprecedented noise level reached allows us to detect striking new features of the ordered magnetic field. The nuclear outflow extends far into the halo to about 5\,kpc from the center and is spatially correlated with the $\rm{H}\alpha$ and X-ray emission. For the first time, the southern outflow is detected. Above and below both spiral arms we find extended blobs of polarized emission with an ordered field oriented perpendicular to the disk. The synchrotron lifetime of the cosmic ray electrons (CREs) in these regions yields a mean outflow velocity of $(270\pm70)\kms$, in agreement with a galactic wind scenario. The observed symmetry of the polarized halo features in NGC 4388 excludes a compression of the halo gas by the ram pressure of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). The assumption of equilibrium between the halo pressure and the ICM ram pressure yields an estimate of the ICM density that is consistent with both the ICM density derived from X-ray observations and the recent \textit{Planck} Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements. The detection of a faint radio halo around cluster galaxies could thus be used for an estimate of ICM ram pressure.
  • We aim to explore whether strong magnetic fields can be effectively generated in low-mass dwarf galaxies and, if so, whether such fields can be affected by galactic outflows and spread out into the intergalactic medium (IGM). We performed a radio continuum polarimetry study of IC10, the nearest starbursting dwarf galaxy, using a combination of multifrequency interferometric (VLA) and single-dish (Effelsberg) observations. VLA observations at 1.43 GHz reveal an extensive and almost spherical radio halo of IC10 in total intensity, extending twice more than the infrared-emitting galactic disk. The halo is magnetized with a magnetic field strength of 7 microG in the outermost parts. Locally, the magnetic field reaches about 29 microG in HII complexes, becomes more ordered, and weakens to 22 microG in the synchrotron superbubble and to 7-10 microG within HI holes. At the higher frequency of 4.86 GHz, we found a large-scale magnetic field structure of X-shaped morphology, similar to that observed in several edge-on spiral galaxies. The X-shaped magnetic structure can be caused by the galactic wind, advecting magnetic fields injected into the interstellar medium by stellar winds and supernova explosions. The radio continuum scale heights at 1.43 GHz indicate the bulk speed of cosmic-ray electrons outflowing from HII complexes of about 60 km/s, exceeding the escape velocity of 40 km/s. Hence, the magnetized galactic wind in IC10 inflates the extensive radio halo visible at 1.43 GHz and can seed the IGM with both random and ordered magnetic fields. These are signatures of intense material feedback onto the IGM, expected to be prevalent in the protogalaxies of the early Universe.
  • We present 1D cosmic ray transport models, numerically solving equations of pure advection and diffusion for the electrons and calculating synchrotron emission spectra. We find that for exponential halo magnetic field distributions advection leads to approximately exponential radio continuum intensity profiles, whereas diffusion leads to profiles that can be better approximated by a Gaussian function. Accordingly, the vertical radio spectral profiles for advection are approximately linear, whereas for diffusion they are of `parabolic' shape. We compare our models with deep ATCA observations of two edge-on galaxies, NGC 7090 and 7462, at $\lambda\lambda$ 22 and 6 cm. Our result is that the cosmic ray transport in NGC 7090 is advection dominated with $V=150^{+80}_{-30}~\rm km\,s^{-1}$, and that the one in NGC 7462 is diffusion dominated with $D=3.0\pm 1.0 \times 10^{28}E_{\rm GeV}^{0.5}~\rm cm^2\,s^{-1}$. NGC 7090 has both a thin and thick radio disc with respective magnetic field scale heights of $h_{\rm B1}=0.8\pm 0.1$ kpc and $h_{\rm B2}=4.7\pm 1.0$ kpc. NGC 7462 has only a thick radio disc with $h_{\rm B2}=3.8\pm 1.0$ kpc. In both galaxies, the magnetic field scale heights are significantly smaller than what estimates from energy equipartition would suggest. A non-negligible fraction of cosmic ray electrons can escape from NGC 7090, so that this galaxy is not an electron calorimeter.
  • Radio synchrotron emission is a powerful tool to study the strength and structure of magnetic fields in galaxies. Unpolarized synchrotron emission traces isotropic turbulent fields which are strongest in spiral arms and bars (20-30 \mu G) and in central starburst regions (50-100 \mu G). Such fields are dynamically important; they affect gas flows and drive gas inflows in central regions. -- Polarized emission traces ordered fields, which can be regular or anisotropic turbulent, where the latter originates from isotropic turbulent fields by the action of compression or shear. The strongest ordered fields (10-15 \mu G) are generally found in interarm regions. In galaxies with strong density waves, ordered fields are also observed at the inner edges of spiral arms. Ordered fields with spiral patterns exist in grand-design, barred and flocculent galaxies, and in central regions. Ordered fields in interacting galaxies have asymmetric distributions and are a tracer of past interactions between galaxies or with the intergalactic medium. In radio halos around edge-on galaxies, ordered magnetic fields with X-shaped patterns are observed. -- Faraday rotation measures of the diffuse polarized radio emission from galaxy disks reveal large-scale spiral patterns that can be described by the superposition of azimuthal modes; these are signatures of regular fields generated by mean-field dynamos. "Magnetic arms" between gaseous spiral arms may also be products of dynamo action, but need a stable spiral pattern to develop. Helically twisted field loops winding around spiral arms were found in two galaxies so far. Large-scale field reversals, like the one found in the Milky Way, could not yet be detected in external galaxies. -- The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields will be studied with forthcoming radio telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array.
  • How a galaxy regulates its SNe energy into different interstellar/circumgalactic medium components strongly affects galaxy evolution. Based on the JVLA D-configuration C- (6 GHz) and L-band (1.6 GHz) continuum observations, we perform statistical analysis comparing multi-wavelength properties of the CHANG-ES galaxies. The high-quality JVLA data and edge-on orientation enable us for the first time to include the halo into the energy budget for a complete radio-flux-limited sample. We find tight correlations of $L_{\rm radio}$ with the mid-IR-based SFR. The normalization of our $I_{\rm 1.6GHz}/{\rm W~Hz^{-1}}-{\rm SFR}$ relation is $\sim$2-3 times of those obtained for face-on galaxies, probably a result of enhanced IR extinction at high inclination. We also find tight correlations between $L_{\rm radio}$ and the SNe energy injection rate $\dot{E}_{\rm SN(Ia+CC)}$, indicating the energy loss via synchrotron radio continuum accounts for $\sim0.1\%$ of $\dot{E}_{\rm SN}$, comparable to the energy contained in CR electrons. The integrated C-to-L-band spectral index is $\alpha\sim0.5-1.1$ for non-AGN galaxies, indicating a dominance by the diffuse synchrotron component. The low-scatter $L_{\rm radio}-{\rm SFR}$/$L_{\rm radio}-\dot{E}_{\rm SN (Ia+CC)}$ relationships have super-linear logarithmic slopes at $\sim2~\sigma$ in L-band ($1.132\pm0.067$/$1.175\pm0.102$) while consistent with linear in C-band ($1.057\pm0.075$/$1.100\pm0.123$). The super-linearity could be naturally reproduced with non-calorimeter models for galaxy disks. Using Chandra halo X-ray measurements, we find sub-linear $L_{\rm X}-L_{\rm radio}$ relations. These results indicate that the observed radio halo of a starburst galaxy is close to electron calorimeter, and a galaxy with higher SFR tends to distribute an increased fraction of SNe energy into radio emission (than X-ray).
  • We present the first part of the observations made for the Continuum Halos in Nearby Galaxies, an EVLA Survey (CHANG-ES) project. The aim of the CHANG-ES project is to study and characterize the nature of radio halos, their prevalence as well as their magnetic fields, and the cosmic rays illuminating these fields. This paper reports observations with the compact D configuration of the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) for the sample of 35 nearby edge-on galaxies of CHANG-ES. With the new wide bandwidth capabilities of the VLA, an unprecedented sensitivity was achieved for all polarization products. The beam resolution is an average of 9.6" and 36" with noise levels reaching approximately 6 and 30 microJy per beam for C- and L-bands, respectively (robust weighting). We present intensity maps in these two frequency bands (C and L), with different weightings, as well as spectral index maps, polarization maps, and new measurements of star formation rates (SFRs). The data products described herein are available to the public in the CHANG-ES data release available at www.queensu.ca/changes. We also present evidence of a trend among galaxies with larger halos having higher SFR surface density, and we show, for the first time, a radio continuum image of the median galaxy, taking advantage of the collective signal-to-noise ratio of 30 of our galaxies. This image shows clearly that a typical spiral galaxy is surrounded by a halo of magnetic fields and cosmic rays.
  • We know that magnetic fields are pervasive across all scales in the Universe and over all of cosmic time and yet our understanding of many of the properties of magnetic fields is still limited. We do not yet know when, where or how the first magnetic fields in the Universe were formed, nor do we fully understand their role in fundamental processes such as galaxy formation or cosmic ray acceleration or how they influence the evolution of astrophysical objects. The greatest challenge to addressing these issues has been a lack of deep, broad bandwidth polarimetric data over large areas of the sky. The Square Kilometre Array will radically improve this situation via an all-sky polarisation survey that delivers both high quality polarisation imaging in combination with observations of 7-14 million extragalactic rotation measures. Here we summarise how this survey will improve our understanding of a range of astrophysical phenomena on scales from individual Galactic objects to the cosmic web.
  • The total and polarized radio continuum emission of IC 342 was observed in four wavelength bands with the Effelsberg and VLA telescopes. The frequency dependence of the radial scalelength of synchrotron emission indicates energy-dependent propagation of the cosmic-ray electrons, probably via the streaming instability. The equipartition strength of the total magnetic field is typically 15 muG, that of the ordered field 5 muG. Faraday rotation of the polarization angles reveals an underlying regular field of only about 0.5 muG strength with a large-scale axisymmetric spiral pattern, signature of a mean-field dynamo, and an about 10x stronger field that fluctuates on scales of a few 100 pc. The magnetic field around the bar in the central region of IC 342 resembles that of large barred galaxies; its regular spiral field is directed outwards, opposite to that in the disk. The polarized emission in the disk is concentrated in: (1) a narrow arm of about 300 pc width, displaced inwards with respect to the eastern arm by about 200 pc, indicating magnetic fields compressed by a density wave; (2) a broad arm of 300-500 pc width around the northern arm with systematic variations in polarized emission, polarization angles, and Faraday rotation measures on a scale of about 2 kpc, indicative of a helically twisted flux tube generated by the Parker instability; (3) a rudimentary "magnetic arm" in an interarm region in the north-west; (4) several broad spiral arms in the outer galaxy, related to spiral arms in the total neutral gas; (5) short features in the outer south-western galaxy, probably distorted by tidal interaction. - The generation and development of "magnetic arms" by a mean-field dynamo probably need a spiral pattern that is stable over a few galactic rotation periods. The dynamo in IC 342 is slow and weak, probably disturbed by the bar, tidal interaction, or a transient spiral pattern.
  • Observations of regular magnetic fields in several nearby galaxies reveal magnetic arms situated between the material arms. The nature of these magnetic arms is a topic of active debate. Previously we found a hint that taking into account the effects of injections of small-scale magnetic fields generated, e.g., by turbulent dynamo action, into the large-scale galactic dynamo can result in magnetic arm formation. We now investigate the joint roles of an arm/interarm turbulent diffusivity contrast and injections of small-scale magnetic field on the formation of large-scale magnetic field ("magnetic arms") in the interarm region. We use the relatively simple "no-$z$" model for the galactic dynamo. This involves projection on to the galactic equatorial plane of the azimuthal and radial magnetic field components; the field component orthogonal to the galactic plane is estimated from the solenoidality condition. We find that addition of diffusivity gradients to the effect of magnetic field injections makes the magnetic arms much more pronounced. In particular, the regular magnetic field component becomes larger in the interarm space compared to that within the material arms.The joint action of the turbulent diffusivity contrast and small-scale magnetic field injections (with the possible participation of other effects previously suggested) appears to be a plausible explanation for the phenomenon of magnetic arms.
  • The spectral index of synchrotron emission is an important parameter in understanding the properties of cosmic ray electrons (CREs) and the interstellar medium (ISM). We determine the synchrotron spectral index ($\alpha_{\rm nt}$) of four nearby star-forming galaxies, namely NGC 4736, NGC 5055, NGC 5236 and NGC 6946 at sub-kpc linear scales. The $\alpha_{\rm nt}$ was determined between 0.33 and 1.4 GHz for all the galaxies. We find the spectral index to be flatter ($\gtrsim -0.7$) in regions with total neutral (atomic + molecular) gas surface density, $\Sigma_{\rm gas} \gtrsim \rm 50~M_\odot pc^{-2}$, typically in the arms and inner parts of the galaxies. In regions with $\Sigma_{\rm gas} \lesssim \rm 50~M_\odot pc^{-2}$, especially in the interarm and outer regions of the galaxies, the spectral index steepens sharply to $<-1.0$. The flattening of $\alpha_{\rm nt}$ is unlikely to be caused due to thermal free--free absorption at 0.33 GHz. Our result is consistent with the scenario where the CREs emitting at frequencies below $\sim0.3$ GHz are dominated by bremsstrahlung and/or ionization losses. For denser medium ($\Sigma_{\rm gas} \gtrsim \rm 200~M_\odot pc^{-2}$), having strong magnetic fields ($\sim 30~\mu$G), $\alpha_{\rm nt}$ is seen to be flatter than $-0.5$, perhaps caused due to ionization losses. We find that, due to the clumpy nature of the ISM, such dense regions cover only a small fraction of the galaxy ($\lesssim5$ percent). Thus, the galaxy-integrated spectrum may not show indication of such loss mechanisms and remain a power-law over a wide range of radio frequencies (between $\sim 0.1$ to 10 GHz).
  • Deep surveys with the SKA1-MID array offer for the first time the opportunity to systematically explore the polarization properties of the microJy source population. Our knowledge of the polarized sky approaching these levels is still very limited. In total intensity the population will be dominated by star-forming and normal galaxies to intermediate redshifts ($z \sim1-2$), and low-luminosity AGN to high redshift. The polarized emission from these objects is a powerful probe of their intrinsic magnetic fields and of their magnetic environments. For redshift of order 1 and above the broad bandwidth of the mid-bands span the Faraday thick and thin regimes allowing study of the intrinsic polarization properties of these objects as well as depolarization from embedded and foreground plasmas. The deep field polarization images will provide Rotation Measures data with very high solid angle density allowing a sensitive statistical analysis of the angular variation of RM on critical arc-minute scales from a magnetic component of Large Scale Structure of the Universe.
  • Faraday rotation of polarised background sources is a unique probe of astrophysical magnetic fields in a diverse range of foreground objects. However, to understand the properties of the polarised sources themselves and of depolarising phenomena along the line of sight, we need to complement Faraday rotation data with polarisation observations over very broad bandwidths. Just as it is impossible to properly image a complex source with limited u-v coverage, we can only meaningfully understand the magneto-ionic properties of polarised sources if we have excellent coverage in $\lambda^2$-space. We here propose a set of broadband polarisation surveys with the Square Kilometre Array, which will provide a singular set of scientific insights on the ways in which galaxies and their environments have evolved over cosmic time.
  • Dark Matter (DM) is a fundamental ingredient of our Universe and of structure formation, and yet its nature is elusive to astrophysical probes. Information on the nature and physical properties of the WIMP (neutralino) DM (the leading candidate for a cosmologically relevant DM) can be obtained by studying the astrophysical signals of their annihilation/decay. Among the various e.m. signals, secondary electrons produced by neutralino annihilation generate synchrotron emission in the magnetized atmosphere of galaxy clusters and galaxies which could be observed as a diffuse radio emission (halo or haze) centered on the DM halo. A deep search for DM radio emission with SKA in local dwarf galaxies, galaxy regions with low star formation and galaxy clusters (with offset DM-baryonic distribution, like e.g. the Bullet cluster) can be very effective in constraining the neutralino mass, composition and annihilation cross-section. For the case of a dwarf galaxy, like e.g. Draco, the constraints on the DM annihilation cross-section obtainable with SKA1-MID will be at least a factor $\sim 10^3$ more stringent than the limits obtained by Fermi-LAT in the $\gamma$-rays. These limits scale with the value of the B field, and the SKA will have the capability to determine simultaneously both the magnetic field in the DM-dominated structures and the DM particle properties. The optimal frequency band for detecting the DM-induced radio emission is around $\sim 1$ GHz, with the SKA1-MID Band 1 and 4 important to probe the synchrotron spectral curvature at low-$\nu$ (sensitive to DM composition) and at high-$\nu$ (sensitive to DM mass).
  • Magnetic fields are an important ingredient of the interstellar medium (ISM). Besides their importance for star formation, they govern the transport of cosmic rays, relevant to the launch and regulation of galactic outflows and winds, which in turn are pivotal in shaping the structure of halo magnetic fields. Mapping the small-scale structure of interstellar magnetic fields in many nearby galaxies is crucial to understand the interaction between gas and magnetic fields, in particular how gas flows are affected. Elucidation of the magnetic role in, e.g., triggering star formation, forming and stabilising spiral arms, driving outflows, gas heating by reconnection and magnetising the intergalactic medium has the potential to revolutionise our physical picture of the ISM and galaxy evolution in general. Radio polarisation observations in the very nearest galaxies at high frequencies (>= 3 GHz) and with high spatial resolution (<= 5") hold the key here. The galaxy survey with SKA1 that we propose will also be a major step to understand the galactic dynamo, which is important for models of galaxy evolution and for astrophysical magnetohydrodynamics in general. Field amplification by turbulent gas motions, which is crucial for efficient dynamo action, has been investigated so far only in simulations, while compelling evidence of turbulent fields from observations is still lacking.