• We present results on the structural properties of massive passive galaxies in three clusters at $1.39<z<1.61$ from the KMOS Cluster Survey. We measure light-weighted and mass-weighted sizes from optical and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging and spatially resolved stellar mass maps. The rest-frame $R$-band sizes of these galaxies are a factor of $\sim2-3$ smaller than their local counterparts. The slopes of the relation between the stellar mass and the light-weighted size are consistent with recent studies in clusters and the field. Their mass-weighted sizes are smaller than the rest frame $R$-band sizes, with an average mass-weighted to light-weighted size ratio that varies between $\sim0.45$ and $0.8$ among the clusters. We find that the median light-weighted size of the passive galaxies in the two more evolved clusters is $\sim24\%$ larger than for field galaxies, independent of the use of circularized effective radii or semi-major axes. These two clusters also show a smaller size ratio than the less evolved cluster, which we investigate using color gradients to probe the underlying $M_{*}/L_{H_{160}}$ gradients. The median color gradients are $\nabla{z-H} \sim-0.4$ mag dex$^{-1}$, twice the local value. Using stellar populations models, these gradients are best reproduced by a combination of age and metallicity gradients. Our results favor the minor merger scenario as the dominant process responsible for the observed galaxy properties and the environmental differences at this redshift. The environmental differences support that clusters experience accelerated structural evolution compared to the field, likely via an epoch of enhanced minor merger activity during cluster assembly.
  • We present the analysis of the fundamental plane (FP) for a sample of 19 massive red-sequence galaxies ($M_{\star} >4\times10^{10} M_{\odot}$) in 3 known overdensities at $1.39<z<1.61$ from the KMOS Cluster Survey, a guaranteed time program with spectroscopy from the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) at the VLT and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope. As expected, we find that the FP zero-point in $B$ band evolves with redshift, from the value 0.443 of Coma to $-0.10\pm0.09$, $-0.19\pm0.05$, $-0.29\pm0.12$ for our clusters at $z=1.39$, $z=1.46$, and $z=1.61$, respectively. For the most massive galaxies ($\log M_{\star}/M_{\odot}>11$) in our sample, we translate the FP zero-point evolution into a mass-to-light-ratio $M/L$ evolution finding $\Delta \log M/L_{B}=(-0.46\pm0.10)z$, $\Delta \log M/L_{B}=(-0.52\pm0.07)z$, to $\Delta \log M/L_{B}=(-0.55\pm0.10)z$, respectively. We assess the potential contribution of the galaxies structural and stellar velocity dispersion evolution to the evolution of the FP zero-point and find it to be $\sim$6-35 % of the FP zero-point evolution. The rate of $M/L$ evolution is consistent with galaxies evolving passively. By using single stellar population models, we find an average age of $2.33^{+0.86}_{-0.51}$ Gyr for the $\log M_{\star}/M_{\odot}>11$ galaxies in our massive and virialized cluster at $z=1.39$, $1.59^{+1.40}_{-0.62}$ Gyr in a massive but not virialized cluster at $z=1.46$, and $1.20^{+1.03}_{-0.47}$ Gyr in a protocluster at $z=1.61$. After accounting for the difference in the age of the Universe between redshifts, the ages of the galaxies in the three overdensities are consistent within the errors, with possibly a weak suggestion that galaxies in the most evolved structure are older.
  • As the nearest large spiral galaxy, M31 provides a unique opportunity to learn about the structure and evolutionary history of this galaxy type in great detail. Among the many observing programs aimed at M31 are microlensing studies, which require good three-dimensional models of the stellar mass distribution. Possible non-axisymmetric structures like a bar need to be taken into account. Due to M31's high inclination, the bar is difficult to detect in photometry alone. Therefore, detailed kinematic measurements are needed to constrain the possible existence and position of a bar in M31. We obtained $\approx$ 220 separate fields with the optical IFU spectrograph VIRUS-W, covering the whole bulge region of M31 and parts of the disk. We derive stellar line-of-sight velocity distributions from the stellar absorption lines, as well as velocity distributions and line fluxes of the emission lines H$\beta$, [OIII] and [NI]. Our data supersede any previous study in terms of spacial coverage and spectral resolution. We find several features that are indicative of a bar in the kinematics of the stars, we see intermediate plateaus in the velocity and the velocity dispersion, and correlation between the higher moment $h3$ and the velocity. The gas kinematics is highly irregular, but is consistent with non-triaxial streaming motions caused by a bar. The morphology of the gas shows a spiral pattern, with seemingly lower inclination than the stellar disk. We also look at the ionization mechanisms of the gas, which happens mostly through shocks and not through starbursts.
  • We explore the H-alpha emission in the massive quiescent galaxies observed by the KMOS-3D survey at 0.7 < z < 2.7. The H-alpha line is robustly detected in 20 out of 120 UVJ-selected quiescent galaxies, and we classify the emission mechanism using the H-alpha line width and the [NII]/H-alpha line ratio. We find that AGN are likely to be responsible for the line emission in more than half of the cases. We also find robust evidence for star formation activity in nine quiescent galaxies, which we explore in detail. The H-alpha kinematics reveal rotating disks in five of the nine galaxies. The dust-corrected H-alpha star formation rates are low (0.2 - 7 Msun/yr), and place these systems significantly below the main sequence. The 24micron-based infrared luminosities, instead, overestimate the star formation rates. These galaxies present a lower gas-phase metallicity compared to star-forming objects with similar stellar mass, and many of them have close companions. We therefore conclude that the low-level star formation activity in these nine quiescent galaxies is likely to be fueled by inflowing gas or minor mergers, and could be a sign of rejuvenation events.
  • We present measurements of the [NII]/Ha ratio as a probe of gas-phase oxygen abundance for a sample of 419 star-forming galaxies at z=0.6-2.7 from the KMOS3D near-IR multi-IFU survey. The mass-metallicity relation (MZR) is determined consistently with the same sample selection, metallicity tracer, and methodology over the wide redshift range probed by the survey. We find good agreement with long-slit surveys in the literature, except for the low-mass slope of the relation at z~2.3, where this sample is less biased than previous samples based on optical spectroscopic redshifts. In this regime we measure a steeper slope than some literature results. Excluding the AGN contribution from the MZR reduces sensitivity at the high mass end, but produces otherwise consistent results. There is no significant dependence of the [NII]/Ha ratio on SFR or environment at fixed redshift and stellar mass. The IFU data allow spatially resolved measurements of [NII]/Ha, from which we can infer abundance gradients for 180 galaxies, thus tripling the current sample in the literature. The observed gradients are on average flat, with only 15 gradients statistically offset from zero at >3sigma. We have modelled the effect of beam-smearing, assuming a smooth intrinsic radial gradient and known seeing, inclination and effective radius for each galaxy. Our seeing-limited observations can recover up to 70% of the intrinsic gradient for the largest, face-on disks, but only 30% for the smaller, more inclined galaxies. We do not find significant trends between observed or corrected gradients and any stellar population, dynamical or structural galaxy parameters, mostly in agreement with existing studies with much smaller sample sizes. In cosmological simulations, strong feedback is generally required to produce flat gradients at high redshift.
  • We analyse the sizes, colour gradients, and resolved stellar mass distributions for 36 massive and passive galaxies in the cluster XMMUJ2235-2557 at z=1.39 using optical and near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We derive light-weighted S\'ersic fits in five HST bands ($i_{775},z_{850},Y_{105},J_{125},H_{160}$), and find that the size decreases by ~20% going from $i_{775}$ to $H_{160}$ band, consistent with recent studies. We then generate spatially resolved stellar mass maps using an empirical relationship between $M_{*}/L_{H_{160}}$ and $(z_{850}-H_{160})$ and use these to derive mass-weighted S\'ersic fits: the mass-weighted sizes are ~41% smaller than their rest-frame $r$-band counterparts compared with an average of ~12% at z~0. We attribute this evolution to the evolution in the $M_{*}/L_{H_{160}}$ and colour gradient. Indeed, as expected, the ratio of mass-weighted to light-weighted size is correlated with the $M_{*}/L$ gradient, but is also mildly correlated with the mass surface density and mass-weighted size. The colour gradients $(\nabla_{z-H})$ are mostly negative, with a median value of $\sim0.45$ mag dex$^{-1}$, twice the local value. The evolution is caused by an evolution in age gradients along the semi-major axis ($a$), with $\nabla_{age} = d \log(age) / d \log(a)$ $\sim-0.33$, while the survival of weaker colour gradients in old, local galaxies implies that metallicity gradients are also required, with $\nabla_{Z} = d \log(Z) / d \log(a)$ $\sim-0.2$. This is consistent with recent observational evidence for the inside-out growth of passive galaxies at high redshift, and favours a gradual mass growth mechanism, such as minor mergers.
  • We present a quantitative spectroscopic study of twenty-seven red supergiants in the Sculptor Galaxy NGC 300. J-band spectra were obtained using KMOS on the VLT and studied with state of the art synthetic spectra including NLTE corrections for the strongest diagnostic lines. We report a central metallicity of [Z]= -0.03 +/- 0.05 with a gradient of -0.083 +/- 0.014 [dex/kpc], in agreement with previous studies of blue supergiants and H II-region auroral line measurements. This result marks the first application of the J-band spectroscopic method to a population of individual red supergiant stars beyond the Local Group of galaxies and reveals the great potential of this technique.
  • We investigate the stellar populations of 25 massive, galaxies ($\log[M_\ast/M_\odot] \geq 10.9$) at $1.5 < z < 2$ using data obtained with the K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph (KMOS) on the ESO VLT. Targets were selected to be quiescent based on their broadband colors and redshifts using data from the 3D-HST grism survey. The mean redshift of our sample is $\bar{z} = 1.75$, where KMOS YJ-band data probe age- and metallicity-sensitive absorption features in the rest-frame optical, including the $G$ band, Fe I, and high-order Balmer lines. Fitting simple stellar population models to a stack of our KMOS spectra, we derive a mean age of $1.03^{+0.13}_{-0.08}$ Gyr. We confirm previous results suggesting a correlation between color and age for quiescent galaxies, finding mean ages of $1.22^{+0.56}_{-0.19}$ Gyr and $0.85^{+0.08}_{-0.05}$ Gyr for the reddest and bluest galaxies in our sample. Combining our KMOS measurements with those obtained from previous studies at $0.2 < z < 2$ we find evidence for a $2-3$ Gyr spread in the formation epoch of massive galaxies. At $z < 1$ the measured stellar ages are consistent with passive evolution, while at $1 < z \lesssim2$ they appear to saturate at $\sim$1 Gyr, which likely reflects changing demographics of the (mean) progenitor population. By comparing to star-formation histories inferred for "normal" star-forming galaxies, we show that the timescales required to form massive galaxies at $z \gtrsim 1.5$ are consistent with the enhanced $\alpha$-element abundances found in massive local early-type galaxies.
  • We investigate whether the large scale structure environment of galaxy clusters imprints a selection bias on Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) catalogs. Such a selection effect might be caused by line of sight (LoS) structures that add to the SZ signal or contain point sources that disturb the signal extraction in the SZ survey. We use the Planck PSZ1 union catalog (Planck Collab- oration et al. 2013a) in the SDSS region as our sample of SZ selected clusters. We calculate the angular two-point correlation function (2pcf) for physically correlated, foreground and background structure in the RedMaPPer SDSS DR8 catalog with respect to each cluster. We compare our results with an optically selected comparison cluster sample and with theoretical predictions. In contrast to the hypothesis of no environment-based selection, we find a mean 2pcf for background structures of -0.049 on scales of $\lesssim 40'$, significantly non-zero at $\sim 4 \sigma$, which means that Planck clusters are more likely to be detected in regions of low background density. We hypothesize this effect arises either from background estimation in the SZ survey or from radio sources in the background. We estimate the defect in SZ signal caused by this effect to be negligibly small, of the order of $\sim 10^{-4}$ of the signal of a typical Planck detection. Analogously, there are no implications on X-ray mass measurements. However, the environ- mental dependence has important consequences for weak lensing follow up of Planck galaxy clusters: we predict that projection effects account for half of the mass contained within a 15' radius of Planck galaxy clusters. We did not detect a background underdensity of CMASS LRGs, which also leaves a spatially varying redshift dependence of the Planck SZ selection function as a possible cause for our findings.
  • We present the largest M31 near-infrared (F110W (close to J band), F160W (H band)) Cepheid sample so far. The sample consists of 371 Cepheids with photometry obtained from the HST PHAT program. The sample of 319 fundamental mode Cepheids, 16 first overtone Cepheids and 36 type II Cepheids, was identified using the median absolute deviation (MAD) outlier rejection method we develop here. This method does not rely on priors and allows us to obtain this clean Cepheid sample without rejecting a large fraction of Cepheids. The obtained Period-Luminosity relations (PLRs) have a very small dispersion, i.e. 0.155 mag in F160W, despite using random phased observations. This remarkably small dispersion allows us to determine that the PLRs are significantly better described by a broken slope at ten days than a linear slope. The use of our sample as an anchor to determine the Hubble constant gives a $3.2\%$ larger Hubble constant compared to the Riess et al. (2012) sample.
  • The Hobby-Eberly Telescope is used to measure the velocity dispersion profile of the nearest prototypical cD galaxy, NGC 6166 in cluster Abell 2199. We also present surface photometry from many telescopes. We confirm the defining feature of a cD -- a halo of stars that fills the cluster center and that is controlled by cluster gravity, not by the central galaxy. The velocity dispersion of NGC 6166 rises from 300 km/s at the center to 865 +- 58 km/s at 100 arcsec radius in the halo. This shows for the first time that the dispersion rises all the way to the cluster value, 819 +- 32 km/s. We find that the main body of NGC 6166 moves at 206 +- 39 km/s with respect to the cluster velocity, whereas the velocity of the cD halo is 70 km/s closer to the cluster velocity. These results support our picture that cD halos consist of stars that are stripped from cluster galaxies. But we do not confirm the view that cD halos are an extra, low-surface-brightness component that is distinct from the main body of a normal giant elliptical. Instead, all of the brightness profile of NGC 6166 outside its core is described to +- 0.037 mag/arcsec**2 by a single Sersic function with index n ~ 8.3. The cD halo is not recognizable from photometry alone. This blurs the distinction between cDs and similar-n core-boxy-nonrotating ellipticals. Both may have halos made largely via minor mergers and the accumulation of debris. However, the cD halo of NGC 6166 is as enhanced in alpha elements as the main body. Quenching of star formation in <~1 Gyr happened even to the galaxies that contributed the cD halo.
  • Detailed imaging and spectroscopic analysis of the centers of nearby S0 and spiral galaxies shows the existence of "composite bulges", where both classical bulges and disky pseudobulges coexist in the same galaxy. As part of a search for supermassive black holes in nearby galaxy nuclei, we obtained VLT-SINFONI observations in adaptive-optics mode of several of these galaxies. Schwarzschild dynamical modeling enables us to disentangle the stellar orbital structure of the different central components, and to distinguish the differing contributions of kinematically hot (classical bulge) and kinematically cool (pseudobulge) components in the same galaxy.
  • We present photometric redshifts and associated probability distributions for all detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS). The work makes use of the most up-to-date data from the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and the Taiwan ECDFS Near-Infrared Survey (TENIS) in addition to other data. We also revisit multi-wavelength counterparts for published X-ray sources from the 4Ms-CDFS and 250ks-ECDFS surveys, finding reliable counterparts for 1207 out of 1259 sources ($\sim 96\%$). Data used for photometric redshifts include intermediate-band photometry deblended using the TFIT method, which is used for the first time in this work. Photometric redshifts for X-ray source counterparts are based on a new library of AGN/galaxy hybrid templates appropriate for the faint X-ray population in the CDFS. Photometric redshift accuracy for normal galaxies is 0.010 and for X-ray sources is 0.014, and outlier fractions are $4\%$ and $5.4\%$ respectively. The results within the CANDELS coverage area are even better as demonstrated both by spectroscopic comparison and by galaxy-pair statistics. Intermediate-band photometry, even if shallow, is valuable when combined with deep broad-band photometry. For best accuracy, templates must include emission lines.
  • The Wendelstein Observatory of Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich has recently been upgraded with a modern 2m robotic telescope. One Nasmyth port of the telescope has been equipped with a wide-field corrector which preserves the excellent image quality (< 0.8" median seeing) of the site (Hopp et al. 2008) over a field of view of 0.7 degrees diameter. The available field is imaged by an optical imager (WWFI, the Wendelstein Wide Field Imager) built around a customized 2 $\times$ 2 mosaic of 4k $\times$ 4k 15 \mu m e2v CCDs from Spectral Instruments. This paper provides an overview of the design and the WWFI's performance. We summarize the system mechanics (including a structural analysis), the electronics (and its electromagnetic interference (EMI) protection) and the control software. We discuss in detail detector system parameters, i.e. gain and readout noise, quantum efficiency as well as charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and persistent charges. First on sky tests yield overall good predictability of system throughput based on lab measurements.
  • We present the correlations between stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR) and [NII]/Ha flux ratio as indicator of gas-phase metallicity for a sample of 222 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 2.6 and log(M*/Msun)=9.0-11.5 from the LUCI, SINS/zC-SINF and KMOS3D surveys. This sample provides a unique analysis of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) over an extended redshift range using consistent data analysis techniques and strong-line metallicity indicator. We find a constant slope at the low-mass end of the relation and can fully describe its redshift evolution through the evolution of the characteristic turnover mass where the relation begins to flatten at the asymptotic metallicity. At fixed mass and redshift, our data do not show a correlation between the [NII]/Ha ratio and SFR, which disagrees with the 0.2-0.3dex offset in [NII]/Ha predicted by the "fundamental relation" between stellar mass, SFR and metallicity discussed in recent literature. However, the overall evolution towards lower [NII]/Ha at earlier times does broadly agree with these predictions.
  • Most Milky Way globular clusters (GCs) exhibit measurable flattening, even if on a very low level. Both cluster rotation and tidal fields are thought to cause this flattening. Nevertheless, rotation has only been confirmed in a handful of GCs, based mostly on individual radial velocities at large radii. We are conducting a survey of the central kinematics of Galactic GCs using the new Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W. We detect rotation in all 11 GCs that we have observed so far, rendering it likely that a large majority of the Milky Way GCs rotate. We use published catalogs of the ACS survey of GCs to derive central ellipticities and position angles. We show that in all cases where the central ellipticity permits an accurate measurement of the position angle, those angles are in excellent agreement with the kinematic position angles that we derive from the VIRUS-W velocity fields. We find an unexpected tight correlation between central rotation and outer ellipticity, indicating that rotation drives flattening for the objects in our sample. We also find a tight correlation between central rotation and published values for the central velocity dispersion, most likely due to rotation impacting the old dispersion measurements.
  • Previous studies have reported the existence of two counter-rotating stellar disks in the early-type spiral galaxy NGC7217. We have obtained high-resolution optical spectroscopic data (R ~ 9000) with the new fiber-based Integral Field Unit instrument VIRUS-W at the 2.7m telescope of the McDonald Observatory in Texas. Our analysis confirms the existence of two components. However, we find them to be co-rotating. The first component is the more luminous (~ 77% of the total light), has the higher velocity dispersion (~ 170 km/s) and rotates relatively slowly (projected $v_{max}$ = 50 km/s). The lower luminosity second component, (~ 23% of the total light), has a low velocity dispersion (~ 20 km/s) and rotates quickly (projected $v_{max}$ = 150 km/s). The difference in the kinematics of the two stellar components allows us to perform a kinematic decomposition and to measure the strengths of their Mg and Fe Lick indices separately. The rotational velocities and dispersions of the less luminous and faster component are very similar to those of the interstellar gas as measured from the [OIII] emission. Morphological evidence of active star formation in this component further suggests that NGC7217 may be in the process of (re)growing a disk inside a more massive and higher dispersion stellar halo. The kinematically cold and regular structure of the gas disk in combination with the central almost dust-free morphology allows us to compare the dynamical mass inside of the central 500pc with predictions from a stellar population analysis. We find agreement between the two if a Kroupa stellar initial mass function is assumed.
  • We determine the mass of the nuclear black hole ($M$) in NGC 3706, an early type galaxy with a central surface brightness minimum arising from an apparent stellar ring, which is misaligned with respect to the galaxy's major axis at larger radii. We fit new HST/STIS and archival data with axisymmetric orbit models to determine $M$, mass-to-light ratio ($\Upsilon_V$), and dark matter halo profile. The best-fit model parameters with 1$\sigma$ uncertainties are $M = (6.0^{+0.7}_{-0.9}) \times 10^8\ M_{\scriptscriptstyle \odot}$ and $\Upsilon_V = 6.0 \pm 0.2\ M_{\scriptscriptstyle \odot}\ L_{{\scriptscriptstyle \odot},V}^{-1}$ at an assumed distance of 46 Mpc. The models are inconsistent with no black hole at a significance of $\Delta\chi^2 = 15.4$ and require a dark matter halo to adequately fit the kinematic data, but the fits are consistent with a large range of plausible dark matter halo parameters. The ring is inconsistent with a population of co-rotating stars on circular orbits, which would produce a narrow line-of-sight velocity distribution (LOSVD). Instead, the ring's LOSVD has a small value of $|V|/\sigma$, the ratio of mean velocity to velocity dispersion. Based on the observed low $|V|/\sigma$, our orbit modeling, and a kinematic decomposition of the ring from the bulge, we conclude that the stellar ring contains stars that orbit in both directions. We consider potential origins for this unique feature, including multiple tidal disruptions of stellar clusters, a change in the gravitational potential from triaxial to axisymmetric, resonant capture and inclining of orbits by a binary black hole, and multiple mergers leading to gas being funneled to the center of the galaxy.
  • The Wide Field Camera Transit Survey is a pioneer program aimed to search for extra-solar planets in the near-infrared. The standard data reduction pipeline of the program uses aperture photometry to construct the light curves. We alternatively apply the difference imaging method for the most complete field in the survey and carry out a quantitative comparison between the photometric precision of both methods for objects with J<18. We also report an implementation on the box-fitting detection algorithm, which performs a trapezoid-fit to the folded light curve. Subsequently a set of selection criteria are optimized and applied to the light curves to search for transit candidates, incorporating a parameter to characterize the shape of the transit. We carry out a detailed analysis in the 18 best detections and classify them as transiting planet and eclipsing binary candidates. One planet candidate orbiting a late G-type star is reported. No planet candidate around M-stars has been found, which enabled us to set an upper limit on the occurrence rate of short period giant planets around M-dwarfs in the survey of 1.1%. Furthermore we report the detection of five faint extremely-short period eclipsing binary systems with periods shorter than 0.23 days and three candidate M-dwarf/M-dwarf eclipsing binaries. The detections demonstrate the benefits of using the difference imaging light curves especially when going to fainter magnitudes.
  • We describe the construction of a template set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the estimation of photometric redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs) with a Bayesian template fitting method. By examining the color properties of several publicly available SED sets within a redshift range of 0<z<0.5 and comparing them to SDSS DR7 data, we show that only some of the investigated SEDs approximately match the colors of the LRG data throughout the redshift range, however not at the quantitative level required for precise photometric redshifts. We generate new SEDs by superposing model SEDs of composite stellar populations with a burst model, allowing both components to be reddened by dust, in order to match the data in five different redshift bins. We select a set of SEDs which represents the LRG data in color space within five redshift bins, thus defining our new SED template set for photometric redshift estimates. The results we get with the new template set and our Bayesian template fitting photometric redshift code (PhotoZ) are nearly unbiased, with a scatter of \sigma(\Delta z)=0.027 (including outliers), and a fraction of catastrophic outliers (|z_phot-z_spec|/(1+z_spec)>0.15) of 0.12%. We show that templates that optimally describe the brightest galaxies (-24.5<M_R<-22.7) indeed vary from z=0.1 to z=0.5, consistent with aging of the stellar population. Furthermore, we find that templates that optimally describe galaxies at z<0.1 strongly differ as a function of the absolute magnitude of the galaxies, indicating an increase in star formation activity for less luminous galaxies. Our findings based on the photometry of the SDSS LRGs and our SED template fitting are supported by comparison to the average SDSS LRG spectra in different luminosity and redshift bins.
  • We present a sample of Cepheid variable stars towards M31 based on the first year of regular M31 observations of the PS1 survey in the r_P1 and i_P1 filters. We describe the selection procedure for Cepheid variable stars from the overall variable source sample and develop an automatic classification scheme using Fourier decomposition and the location of the instability strip. We find 1440 fundamental mode (classical \delta) Cep stars, 126 Cepheids in the first overtone mode, and 147 belonging to the Population II types. 296 Cepheids could not be assigned to one of these classes and 354 Cepheids were found in other surveys. These 2009 Cepheids constitute the largest Cepheid sample in M31 known so far and the full catalog is presented in this paper. We briefly describe the properties of our sample in its spatial distribution throughout the M31 galaxy, in its age properties, and we derive an apparent period-luminosity relation (PLR) in our two bands. The Population I Cepheids nicely follow the dust pattern of the M31 disk, whereas the 147 Type II Cepheids are distributed throughout the halo of M31. We outline the time evolution of the star formation in the major ring found previously and find an age gradient. A comparison of our PLR to previous results indicates a curvature term in the PLR.
  • The 4MOST consortium is currently halfway through a Conceptual Design study for ESO with the aim to develop a wide-field (>3 square degree, goal >5 square degree), high-multiplex (>1500 fibres, goal 3000 fibres) spectroscopic survey facility for an ESO 4m-class telescope (VISTA). 4MOST will run permanently on the telescope to perform a 5 year public survey yielding more than 20 million spectra at resolution R~5000 ({\lambda}=390-1000 nm) and more than 2 million spectra at R~20,000 (395-456.5 nm & 587-673 nm). The 4MOST design is especially intended to complement three key all-sky, space-based observatories of prime European interest: Gaia, eROSITA and Euclid. Initial design and performance estimates for the wide-field corrector concepts are presented. We consider two fibre positioner concepts, a well-known Phi-Theta system and a new R-Theta concept with a large patrol area. The spectrographs are fixed configuration two-arm spectrographs, with dedicated spectrographs for the high- and low-resolution. A full facility simulator is being developed to guide trade-off decisions regarding the optimal field-of-view, number of fibres needed, and the relative fraction of high-to-low resolution fibres. Mock catalogues with template spectra from seven Design Reference Surveys are simulated to verify the science requirements of 4MOST. The 4MOST consortium aims to deliver the full 4MOST facility by the end of 2018 and start delivering high-level data products for both consortium and ESO community targets a year later with yearly increments.
  • We use the Marcario Low Resolution Spectrograph (LRS) at the Hobby-Eberly-Telescope (HET) to study the kinematics of pseudobulges and classical bulges in the nearby universe. We present major-axis rotational velocities, velocity dispersions, and h3 and h4 moments derived from high-resolution (sigma ~ 39 km/s) spectra for 45 S0 to Sc galaxies; for 27 of the galaxies we also present minor axis data. We combine our kinematics with bulge-to-disk decompositions. We demonstrate for the first time that purely kinematic diagnostics of the bulge dichotomy agree systematically with those based on S\'ersic index. Low S\'ersic index bulges have both increased rotational support (higher v/sigma values) and on average lower central velocity dispersions. Furthermore, we confirm that the same correlation also holds when visual morphologies are used to diagnose bulge type. The previously noted trend of photometrically flattened bulges to have shallower velocity dispersion profiles turns to be significant and systematic if the S\'ersic index is used to distinguish between pseudobulges and classical bulges. The correlation between h3 and v/sigma observed in elliptical galaxies is also observed in intermediate type galaxies, irrespective of bulge type. Finally, we present evidence for formerly undetected counter rotation in the two systems NGC 3945 and NGC 4736. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit\"at M\"unchen, and Georg-August-Universit\"at G\"ottingen.
  • We obtained U_330 and B band images of the M31 nucleus using the High Resolution Camera of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spatial resolution in the U_330-band, 0.03" FWHM, or 0.1 pc at M31, is sufficient to resolve the outskirts of the compact cluster (P3) of UV-bright stars surrounding the M31 black hole. The center of the cluster is marked by an extended source that is both brighter and redder than the other point sources within P3; it is likely to be a blend of several bright stars. We hypothesize that it marks the location of the M31 black hole. Both stellar photometry and a surface brightness fluctuation analysis, show that the P3 stellar population is consistent with early-type main sequence stars formed in a ~100 - ~200 Myr old starburst population. Evolutionary tracks of post early asymptotic giant-branch stars, associated with late-stage evolution of an old population, also traverse the U and U-B domain occupied by the P3 stars; but we argue that only a few stars could be accounted for that way. PEAGB evolution is very rapid, and there is no progenitor population of red giants associated with P3. The result that P3 comprises young stars is consistent with inferences from earlier HST observations of the integrated light of the cluster. Like the Milky Way, M31 harbors a black hole closely surrounded by apparently young stars.
  • We update van den Bergh's parallel sequence galaxy classification in which S0 galaxies form a sequence S0a-S0b-S0c that parallels the sequence Sa-Sb-Sc of spiral galaxies. The ratio B/T of bulge to total light defines the position of a galaxy in each sequence. Our classification makes one improvement. We extend the S0a-S0b-S0c sequence to spheroidal ("Sph'") galaxies that are positioned in parallel to irregular galaxies in a similarly extended Sa-Sb-Sc-Im sequence. This provides a natural "home" for spheroidals, which previously were omitted from galaxy classifications. To motivate our juxtaposition of Sph and irregular galaxies, we present photometry and bulge-disk decompositions of Virgo S0s, including late-type S0s that bridge the gap between S0b and Sph galaxies. NGC 4762 is a SB0bc with B/T = 0.13. NGC 4452 is a SB0c galaxy with an even tinier pseudobulge. VCC 2048 and NGC 4638 have properties of both S0cs and Sphs. We update the structural parameter correlations Sphs, irregulars, bulges, and disks. We show that spheroidals of increasing luminosity form a continuous sequence with the disks (but not bulges) of S0c-S0b-S0a galaxies. Remarkably, the Sph--S0-disk sequence is almost identical to that of irregular galaxies and spiral galaxy disks. We review published observations for galaxy transformation processes, particularly ram-pressure stripping of cold gas. We suggest that Sph galaxies are transformed, "red and dead" Scd--Im galaxies in the same way that many S0 galaxies are transformed, red and dead Sa-Sc spiral galaxies