• Variation in behavior among group members often impacts collective outcomes. Individuals may vary both in the task that they perform and in the persistence with which they perform each task. Although both the distribution of individuals among tasks and differences among individuals in behavioral persistence can each impact collective behavior, we do not know if and how they jointly affect collective outcomes. Here we use a detailed computational model to examine the joint impact of colony-level distribution among tasks and behavioral persistence of individuals, specifically their fidelity to particular resource sites, on the collective tradeoff between exploring for new resources and exploiting familiar ones. We developed an agent-based model of foraging honey bees, parameterized by data from 5 colonies, in which we simulated scouts, who search the environment for new resources, and individuals who are recruited by the scouts to the newly found resources, i.e., recruits. We found that for each value of persistence there is a different optimal ratio of scouts to recruits that maximizes resource collection by the colony. Furthermore, changes to the persistence of scouts induced opposite effects from changes to the persistence of recruits on the collective foraging of the colony. The proportion of scouts that resulted in the most resources collected by the colony decreased as the persistence of recruits increased. However, this optimal proportion of scouts increased as the persistence of scouts increased. Thus, behavioral persistence and task participation can interact to impact a colony's collective behavior in orthogonal directions. Our work provides new insights and generates new hypotheses into how variation in behavior at both the individual and colony levels jointly impact the trade-off between exploring for new resources and exploiting familiar ones.
  • A method for online decorrelation of chemical sensor signals from the effects of environmental humidity and temperature variations is proposed. The goal is to improve the accuracy of electronic nose measurements for continuous monitoring by processing data from simultaneous readings of environmental humidity and temperature. The electronic nose setup built for this study included eight metal-oxide sensors, temperature and humidity sensors with a wireless communication link to external computer. This wireless electronic nose was used to monitor air for two years in the residence of one of the authors and it collected data continuously during 537 days with a sampling rate of 1 samples per second. To estimate the effects of variations in air humidity and temperature on the chemical sensors signals, we used a standard energy band model for an n-type metal-oxide (MOX) gas sensor. The main assumption of the model is that variations in sensor conductivity can be expressed as a nonlinear function of changes in the semiconductor energy bands in the presence of external humidity and temperature variations. Fitting this model to the collected data, we confirmed that the most statistically significant factors are humidity changes and correlated changes of temperature and humidity. This simple model achieves excellent accuracy with a coefficient of determination $R^2$ close to 1. To show how the humidity-temperature correction model works for gas discrimination, we constructed a model for online discrimination among banana, wine and baseline response. This shows that pattern recognition algorithms improve performance and reliability by including the filtered signal of the chemical sensors.
  • Estimating the distance of a gas source is important in many applications of chemical sensing, like e.g. environmental monitoring, or chemically-guided robot navigation. If an estimation of the gas concentration at the source is available, source proximity can be estimated from the time-averaged gas concentration at the sensing site. However, in turbulent environments, where fast concentration fluctuations dominate, comparably long measurements are required to obtain a reliable estimate. A lesser known feature that can be exploited for distance estimation in a turbulent environment lies in the relationship between source proximity and the temporal variance of the local gas concentration - the farther the source, the more intermittent are gas encounters. However, exploiting this feature requires measurement of changes in gas concentration on a comparably fast time scale, that have up to now only been achieved using photo-ionisation detectors. Here, we demonstrate that by appropriate signal processing, off-the-shelf metal-oxide sensors are capable of extracting rapidly fluctuating features of gas plumes that strongly correlate with source distance. We show that with a straightforward analysis method it is possible to decode events of large, consistent changes in the measured signal, so-called 'bouts'. The frequency of these bouts predicts the distance of a gas source in wind-tunnel experiments with good accuracy. In addition, we found that the variance of bout counts indicates cross-wind offset to the centreline of the gas plume. Our results offer an alternative approach to estimating gas source proximity that is largely independent of gas concentration, using off-the-shelf metal-oxide sensors. The analysis method we employ demands very few computational resources and is suitable for low-power microcontrollers.
  • For practical construction of complex synthetic genetic networks able to perform elaborate functions it is important to have a pool of relatively simple "bio-bricks" with different functionality which can be compounded together. To complement engineering of very different existing synthetic genetic devices such as switches, oscillators or logical gates, we propose and develop here a design of synthetic multiple input distributed classifier with learning ability. Proposed classifier will be able to separate multi-input data, which are inseparable for single input classifiers. Additionally, the data classes could potentially occupy the area of any shape in the space of inputs. We study two approaches to classification, including hard and soft classification and confirm the schemes of genetic networks by analytical and numerical results.
  • We describe a conceptual design of a distributed classifier formed by a population of genetically engineered microbial cells. The central idea is to create a complex classifier from a population of weak or simple classifiers. We create a master population of cells with randomized synthetic biosensor circuits that have a broad range of sensitivities towards chemical signals of interest that form the input vectors subject to classification. The randomized sensitivities are achieved by constructing a library of synthetic gene circuits with randomized control sequences (e.g. ribosome-binding sites) in the front element. The training procedure consists in re-shaping of the master population in such a way that it collectively responds to the "positive" patterns of input signals by producing above-threshold output (e.g. fluorescent signal), and below-threshold output in case of the "negative" patterns. The population re-shaping is achieved by presenting sequential examples and pruning the population using either graded selection/counterselection or by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We demonstrate the feasibility of experimental implementation of such system computationally using a realistic model of the synthetic sensing gene circuits.
  • We propose a novel multi-layered nonlinear model that is able to capture and predict the housing-demographic dynamics of the real-state market by simulating the transitions of owners among price-based house layers. This model allows us to determine which parameters are most effective to smoothen the severity of a potential market crisis. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has issued severe warnings about the current real-state bubble in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, the Netherlands, Australia and Spain in the last years. Madrid (Spain), in particular, is an extreme case of this bubble. It is, therefore, an excellent test case to analyze housing dynamics in the context of the empirical data provided by the Spanish National Institute of Statistics and other sources of data. The model is able to predict the mean house occupancy, and shows that i) the house market conditions in Madrid are unstable but not critical; and ii) the regulation of the construction rate is more effective than interest rate changes. Our results indicate that to accommodate the construction rate to the total population of first-time buyers is the most effective way to maintain the system near equilibrium conditions. In addition, we show that to raise interest rates will heavily affect the poorest housing bands of the population while the middle class layers remain nearly unaffected.
  • We study the synchronization of two model neurons coupled through a synapse having an activity-dependent strength. Our synapse follows the rules of Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP). We show that this plasticity of the coupling between neurons produces enlarged frequency locking zones and results in synchronization that is more rapid and much more robust against noise than classical synchronization arising from connections with constant strength. We also present a simple discrete map model that demonstrates the generality of the phenomenon.
  • A generalization of the standard susceptible-infectious-removed (SIR) stochastic model for epidemics in sparse random networks is introduced which incorporates contact tracing in addition to random screening. We propose a deterministic mean-field description which yields quantitative agreement with stochastic simulations on random graphs. We also analyze the role of contact tracing in epidemics control in small-world networks and show that its effectiveness grows as the rewiring probability is reduced.
  • We have investigated the role that different connectivity regimes play on the dynamics of a network of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons by computer simulations. The different connectivity topologies exhibit the following features: random connectivity topologies give rise to fast system response yet are unable to produce coherent oscillations in the average activity of the network; on the other hand, regular connectivity topologies give rise to coherent oscillations and temporal coding, but in a temporal scale that is not in accordance with fast signal processing. Finally, small-world (SW) connectivity topologies, which fall between random and regular ones, take advantage of the best features of both, giving rise to fast system response with coherent oscillations along with reproducible temporal coding on clusters of neurons. Our work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to show the need for a small-world topology in order to obtain all these features in synergy within a biologically plausible time scale.
  • We report experimental studies of synchronization phenomena in a pair of biological neurons that interact through naturally occurring, electrical coupling. When these neurons generate irregular bursts of spikes, the natural coupling synchronizes slow oscillations of membrane potential, but not the fast spikes. By adding artificial electrical coupling we studied transitions between synchrony and asynchrony in both slow oscillations and fast spikes. We discuss the dynamics of bursting and synchronization in living neurons with distributed functional morphology.