• An optical vortex coronagraph has been implemented within the NIRC2 camera on the Keck II telescope and used to carry out on-sky tests and observations. The development of this new L'-band observational mode is described, and an initial demonstration of the new capability is presented: a resolved image of the low-mass companion to HIP79124, which had previously been detected by means of interferometry. With HIP79124 B at a projected separation of 186.5 mas, both the small inner working angle of the vortex coronagraph and the related imaging improvements were crucial in imaging this close companion directly. Due to higher Strehl ratios and more relaxed contrasts in L' band versus H band, this new coronagraphic capability will enable high-contrast small-angle observations of nearby young exoplanets and disks on a par with those of shorter-wavelength extreme adaptive optics coronagraphs.
  • We present the Team Keck Redshift Survey 2 (TKRS2), a near-infrared spectral observing program targeting selected galaxies within the CANDELS subsection of the GOODS-North Field. The TKRS2 program exploits the unique capabilities of MOSFIRE, an infrared multi-object spectrometer which entered service on the Keck I telescope in 2012 and contributes substantially to the study of galaxy spectral features at redshifts inaccessible to optical spectrographs. The TKRS2 project targets 97 galaxies drawn from samples that include z~2 emission-line galaxies with features observable in the JHK bands as well as lower-redshift targets with features in the Y band. We present a detailed measurement of MOSFIRE's sensitivity as a function of wavelength, including the effects of telluric features across the YJHK filters. The largest utility of our survey is in providing rest-frame-optical emission lines for z>1 galaxies, and we demonstrate that the ratios of strong, optical emission lines of z~2 galaxies suggest the presence of either higher N/O abundances than are found in z~0 galaxies or low-metallicity gas ionized by an active galactic nucleus. We have released all TKRS2 data products into the public domain to allow researchers access to representative raw and reduced MOSFIRE spectra.
  • Binary mass transfer via Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF) is a key channel for producing stripped-envelope Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars and may be critical to account for SN Ib/c progenitors. RY Scuti is an extremely rare example of a massive binary star caught in this brief but important phase. Its toroidal nebula indicates equatorial mass loss during RLOF, while the mass-gaining star is apparently embedded in an opaque accretion disk. RY Scuti's toroidal nebula has two components: an inner ionised double-ring system, and an outer dust torus that is twice the size of the ionised rings. We present two epochs of Lband Keck NGS-AO images of the dust torus, plus three epochs of HST images of the ionised gas rings. Proper motions show that the inner ionised rings and the outer dust torus came from two separate ejection events roughly 130 and 250 yr ago. This suggests that RLOF in massive contact binaries can be accompanied by eruptive and episodic burst of mass loss, reminiscent of LBVs. We speculate that the repeating outbursts may arise in the mass gainer from instabilities associated with a high accretion rate. If discrete mass-loss episodes in other RLOF binaries are accompanied by luminous outbursts, they might contribute to the population of extragalactic optical transients. When RLOF ends for RY Scuti, the overluminous mass gainer, currently surrounded by an accretion disk, will probably become a B[e] supergiant and may outshine the hotter mass-donor star that should die as a Type Ib/c supernova.
  • We imaged five objects near the star forming clouds of Ophiuchus with the Keck Laser Guide Star AO system. We resolved Allers et al. (2006)'s #11 (Oph 16222-2405) and #16 (Oph 16233-2402) into binary systems. The #11 object is resolved into a 243 AU binary, the widest known for a very low mass (VLM) binary. The binary nature of #11 was discovered first by Allers (2005) and independently here during which we obtained the first spatially resolved R~2000 near-infrared (J & K) spectra, mid-IR photometry, and orbital motion estimates. We estimate for 11A and 11B gravities (log(g)>3.75), ages (5+/-2 Myr), luminosities (log(L/Lsun)=-2.77+/-0.10 and -2.96+/-0.10), and temperatures (Teff=2375+/-175 and 2175+/-175 K). We find self-consistent DUSTY evolutionary model (Chabrier et al. 2000) masses of 17+4-5 MJup and 14+6-5 MJup, for 11A and 11B respectively. Our masses are higher than those previously reported (13-15 MJup and 7-8 MJup) by Jayawardhana & Ivanov (2006b). Hence, we find the system is unlikely a ``planetary mass binary'', (in agreement with Luhman et al. 2007) but it has the second lowest mass and lowest binding energy of any known binary. Oph #11 and Oph #16 belong to a newly recognized population of wide (>100 AU), young (<10 Myr), roughly equal mass, VLM stellar and brown dwarf binaries. We deduce that ~6+/-3% of young (<10 Myr) VLM objects are in such wide systems. However, only 0.3+/-0.1% of old field VLM objects are found in such wide systems. Thus, young, wide, VLM binary populations may be evaporating, due to stellar encounters in their natal clusters, leading to a field population depleted in wide VLM systems.