• The recently discovered bright type II supernova OGLE14-073 evolved very slowly. The light curve rose to maximum for 90 days from discovery and then declined at a rate compatible with the radioactive decay of 56Co. In this study, we show that a pair-instability supernova is a plausible mechanism for this event. We calculate explosion models and light curves with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA starting from two M(ZAMS) = 150 solar masses, Z=0.001 progenitors. We obtain satisfactory fits to OGLE14-073 broadband light curves by including additional 56Ni in the centre of the models and mixing hydrogen down into the inner layers of the ejecta to a radial mass coordinate of 10 solar masses. The extra 56Ni required points to a slightly more massive progenitor star. The mixing of hydrogen could be due to large scale mixing during the explosion. We also present synthetic spectra for our models simulated with the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code ARTIS. The synthetic spectra reproduce the main features of the observed spectra of OGLE14-073. We conclude that OGLE14-073 is one of the most promising candidates for a pair-instability explosion.
  • Massive stars have a strong impact on their surroundings, in particular when they produce a core-collapse supernova at the end of their evolution. In these proceedings, we review the general evolution of massive stars and their properties at collapse as well as the transition between massive and intermediate-mass stars. We also summarise the effects of metallicity and rotation. We then discuss some of the major uncertainties in the modelling of massive stars, with a particular emphasis on the treatment of convection in 1D stellar evolution codes. Finally, we present new 3D hydrodynamic simulations of convection in carbon burning and list key points to take from 3D hydrodynamic studies for the development of new prescriptions for convective boundary mixing in 1D stellar evolution codes.
  • CEMP-s stars are long-lived low-mass stars with a very low iron content as well as overabundances of carbon and s-elements. Their peculiar chemical pattern is often explained by pollution from a AGB star companion. Recent observations have shown that most of the CEMP-s stars are in a binary system, providing support to the AGB companion scenario. A few CEMP-s stars, however, appear to be single. We inspect four apparently single CEMP-s stars and discuss the possibility that they formed from the ejecta of a previous-generation massive star, referred to as the "source" star. In order to investigate this scenario, we computed low-metallicity massive star models with and without rotation and including complete s-process nucleosynthesis. We find that non-rotating source stars cannot explain the observed abundance of any of the four CEMP-s stars. Three out of the four CEMP-s stars can be explained by a $25$ $M_{\odot}$ source star with $v_{\rm ini} \sim 500$ km s$^{-1}$ (spinstar). The fourth CEMP-s star has a high Pb abundance that cannot be explained by any of the models we computed. Since spinstars and AGB predict different ranges of [O/Fe] and [ls/hs], these ratios could be an interesting way to further test these two scenarios.
  • In recent years, the viability of the pair-instability supernova (PISN) scenario for explaining superluminous supernovae has all but disappeared except for a few slowly-evolving examples. However, PISN are not predicted to be superluminous throughout the bulk of their mass range. In fact, it is more likely that the first PISN we see (if we have not seen one already) will not be superluminous. Here, we present hydrodynamic simulations of PISNe for four stellar models with unique envelope properties spanning the PISN mass range. In addition, we compute synthetic light curves for comparison with current and future observations. We also investigate, in the context of our most massive model, the prospect of mixing in the supernova ejecta alleviating discrepancies between current PISN models and the remaining superluminous candidate events. To this end, we present the first published 3D hydrodynamic simulations of PISNe. After achieving convergence between 1D, 2D, and 3D simulations we examine mixing in the supernova ejecta and its affect on the bolometric light curve. We observe slight deviations from spherical symmetry which increase with the number of dimensions. We find no significant effects on the bolometric light curve, however we conclude that mixing between the silicon and oxygen rich layers caused by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability may affect spectra.
  • We present the first detailed three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic implicit large eddy simulations of turbulent convection of carbon burning in massive stars. Simulations begin with radial profiles mapped from a carbon burning shell within a 15$\,\textrm{M}_\odot$ one-dimensional stellar evolution model. We consider models with $128^3$, $256^3$, $512^3$ and $1024^3$ zones. The turbulent flow properties of these carbon burning simulations are very similar to the oxygen burning case. We performed a mean field analysis of the kinetic energy budgets within the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes framework. For the upper convective boundary region, we find that the numerical dissipation is insensitive to resolution for linear mesh resolutions above 512 grid points. For the stiffer, more stratified lower boundary, our highest resolution model still shows signs of decreasing sub-grid dissipation suggesting it is not yet numerically converged. We find that the widths of the upper and lower boundaries are roughly 30% and 10% of the local pressure scale heights, respectively. The shape of the boundaries is significantly different from those used in stellar evolution models. As in past oxygen-shell burning simulations, we observe entrainment at both boundaries in our carbon-shell burning simulations. In the large P\'eclet number regime found in the advanced phases, the entrainment rate is roughly inversely proportional to the bulk Richardson number, Ri$_{\rm B}$ ($\propto $Ri${\rm_B}^{-\alpha}$, $0.5\lesssim \alpha \lesssim 1.0$). We thus suggest the use of Ri$_{\rm B}$ as a means to take into account the results of 3D hydrodynamics simulations in new 1D prescriptions of convective boundary mixing.
  • Context. CEMP-no stars are long-lived low-mass stars with a very low iron content, overabundances of carbon and no or minor signs for the presence of s- or r-elements. Although their origin is still a matter of debate, they are often considered as being made of a material ejected by a previous stellar generation (source stars). Aims. We place constraints on the source stars from the observed abundance data of CEMP-no stars. Methods. We computed source star models of 20, 32, and 60 M$_{\odot}$ at Z = 10$^{-5}$ with and without fast rotation. For each model we also computed a case with a late mixing event occurring between the hydrogen and helium-burning shell $\sim$ 200 yr before the end of the evolution. This creates a partially CNO-processed zone in the source star. We use the 12C/13C and C/N ratios observed on CEMP-no stars to put constraints on the possible source stars (mass, late mixing or not). Then, we inspect more closely the abundance data of six CEMP-no stars and select their preferred source star(s). Results. Four out of the six CEMP-no stars studied cannot be explained without the late mixing process in the source star. Two of them show nucleosynthetic signatures of a progressive mixing (due e.g. to rotation) in the source star. We also show that a 20 M$_{\odot}$ source star is preferred compared to one of 60 M$_{\odot}$ and that likely only the outer layers of the source stars were expelled to reproduce the observed 12C/13C. Conclusions. The results suggest that (1) a late mixing process could operate in some source stars, (2) a progressive mixing, possibly achieved by fast rotation, is at work in several source stars, (3) $\sim$ 20 M$_{\odot}$ source stars are preferred compared to $\sim$ 60 M$_{\odot}$ ones, and (4) the source star might have preferentially experienced a low energetic supernova with large fallback.
  • The $s$-process in massive stars produces the weak component of the $s$-process (nuclei up to $A \sim 90$), in amounts that match solar abundances. For heavier isotopes, such as barium, production through neutron capture is significantly enhanced in very metal-poor stars with fast rotation. However, detailed theoretical predictions for the resulting final $s$-process abundances have important uncertainties caused both by the underlying uncertainties in the nuclear physics (principally neutron capture reaction and $\beta$-decay rates) as well as by the stellar evolution modeling. In this work, we investigated the impact of nuclear-physics uncertainties relevant to the $s$-process in massive stars. Using a Monte-Carlo based approach, we performed extensive nuclear reaction network calculations that include newly evaluated upper and lower limits for the individual temperature dependent reaction rates. We found that most of the uncertainty in the final abundances is caused by uncertainties in the neutron capture rates, while $\beta$-decay rate uncertainties affect only a few nuclei near $s$-process branchings. The $s$-process in rotating metal-poor stars shows quantitatively different uncertainties and key reactions, although the qualitative characteristics are similar. We confirmed that our results do not significantly change at different metallicities for fast rotating massive stars in the very low metallicity regime. We highlight which of the identified key reactions are realistic candidates for improved measurement by future experiments.
  • The treatment of mixing processes is still one of the major uncertainties in 1D stellar evolution models. This is mostly due to the need to parametrize and approximate aspects of hydrodynamics in hydrostatic codes. In particular, the effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in rotating stars, for example, dynamical shear instability, evades consistent description. We intend to study the accuracy of the diffusion approximation to dynamical shear in hydrostatic stellar evolution models by comparing 1D models to a first-principle hydrodynamics simulation starting from the same initial conditions. We chose an initial model calculated with the stellar evolution code GENEC that is just at the onset of a dynamical shear instability but does not show any other instabilities (e.g., convection). This was mapped to the hydrodynamics code SLH to perform a 2D simulation in the equatorial plane. We compare the resulting profiles in the two codes and compute an effective diffusion coefficient for the hydro simulation. Shear instabilities develop in the 2D simulation in the regions predicted by linear theory to become unstable in the 1D model. Angular velocity and chemical composition is redistributed in the unstable region, thereby creating new unstable regions. Eventually the 2D simulation settles in a symmetric, steady state, which is Richardson stable everywhere, whereas the instability remains for longer in the 1D model due to current limitations in the 1D code. A spatially resolved diffusion coefficient is extracted by comparing the initial and final profiles of mean atomic mass. The presented simulation gives a first insight on hydrodynamics of shear instabilities in a real stellar environment and even allows us to directly extract an effective diffusion coefficient. We see evidence for a critical Richardson number of 0.25 as regions above this value remain stable for the course of the simulation.
  • We present a chemical abundance analysis of a metal-poor star, ROA 276, in the stellar system omega Centauri. We confirm that this star has an unusually high [Sr/Ba] abundance ratio. Additionally, ROA 276 exhibits remarkably high abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for all elements from Cu to Mo along with normal abundance ratios for the elements from Ba to Pb. The chemical abundance pattern of ROA 276, relative to a primordial omega Cen star ROA 46, is best fit by a fast-rotating low-metallicity massive stellar model of 20 Msun, [Fe/H] = -1.8, and an initial rotation 0.4 times the critical value; no other nucleosynthetic source can match the neutron-capture element distribution. ROA 276 arguably offers the most definitive proof to date that fast-rotating massive stars contributed to the production of heavy elements in the early Universe.
  • Near-solar metallicity (and low-redshift) Pair-Instability Supernova (PISN) candidates challenge stellar evolution models. Indeed, at such a metallicity, even an initially very massive star generally loses so much mass by stellar winds that it will avoid the electron-positron pair-creation instability. We use recent results showing that a magnetic field at the surface of a massive star can significantly reduce its effective mass-loss rate to compute magnetic models of very massive stars (VMSs) at solar metallicity and explore the possibility that such stars end as PISNe. We implement the quenching of the mass loss produced by a surface dipolar magnetic field into the Geneva stellar evolution code and compute new stellar models with an initial mass of $200\,M_\odot$ at solar metallicity, with and without rotation. It considerably reduces the total amount of mass lost by the star during its life. For the non-rotating model, the total (CO-core) mass of the models is $72.8\,M_\odot$ ($70.1\,M_\odot$) at the onset of the electron-positron pair-creation instability. For the rotating model, we obtain $65.6\,M_\odot$ ($62.4\,M\odot$). In both cases, a significant fraction of the internal mass lies in the region where pair instability occurs in the $\log(T)-\log(\rho)$ plane. The interaction of the reduced mass loss with the magnetic field efficiently brakes the surface of the rotating model, producing a strong shear and hence a very efficient mixing that makes the star evolve nearly homogeneously. The core characteristics of our models indicate that solar metallicity models of magnetic VMSs may evolve to PISNe (and pulsation PISNe).
  • The modelling of massive star evolution is a complex task, and is very sensitive to the way physical processes (such as convection, rotation, mass loss, etc.) are included in stellar evolution code. Moreover, the very high observed fraction of binary systems among massive stars makes the comparison with observations difficult. In this paper, we focus on discussing the uncertainties linked to the modelling of convection and rotation in single massive stars.
  • With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 solar masses) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.
  • Since the emergence of the new class of extremely bright transients, super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe), three main mechanisms to power their light curves (LCs) have been discussed. They are the spin-down of a magnetar, interaction with circumstellar material, and the decay of large amounts of radioactive nickel in pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). Given the high degree of diversity seen within the class, it is possible that all three mechanisms are at work. PISN models can be self- consistently simulated from the main sequence phase of very massive stars (VMS) through to their explosion. These models robustly predict large amounts of radioactive nickel and thus very luminous SN events. However, PISN model LCs evolve more slowly than even the slowest evolving SLSNe. Multidimensional effects on the ejecta structure, specifically the mixing of radioactive nickel out to large radii, could alleviate this discrepancy with observation. Here we explore the multidimensional effects on the LC evolution by simulating the explosion phase in 1D, 2D, and 3D. We find that the ejecta from the multidimensional simulations have slightly shallower abundance gradients due to mixing at shell boundaries. We compute synthetic LCs whose shapes show no discernible differences due to the multidimensional effects.
  • The discovery of the most luminous supernova ASASSN-15lh triggered a shock-wave in the supernova community. The three possible mechanisms proposed for the majority of other superluminous supernovae do not produce a realistic physical model for this particular supernova. In the present study we show the limiting luminosity available from a nickel-powered pair-instability supernova. We computed a few exotic nickel-powered explosions with a total mass of nickel up to 1500 solar masses. We used the hydrostatic configurations prepared with the GENEVA and MESA codes, and the STELLA radiative-transfer code for following the explosion of these models. We show that 1500 solar masses of radioactive nickel is needed to power a luminosity of 2x10^45 erg/s. The resulting light curve is very broad and incompatible with the shorter ASASSN-15lh time-scale. This rules out a nickel-powered origin of ASASSN-15lh. In addition, we derive a simple peak luminosity - nickel mass relation from our data, which may serve to estimate of nickel mass from observed peak luminosities.
  • The nucleosynthesis in the first massive stars may be constrained by observing the surface composition of long-lived very iron-poor stars born around 10 billion years ago from material enriched by their ejecta. Many interesting clues on physical processes having occurred in the first stars can be obtained just based on nuclear aspects. Two facts are particularly clear, 1) in these first massive stars, mixing must have occurred between the H-burning and the He-burning zone during their nuclear lifetimes; 2) only the outer layers of these massive stars have enriched the material from which the very iron-poor stars, observed today in the halo, have formed. These two basic requirements can be obtained by rotating stellar models at very low metallicity. In the present paper, we discuss the arguments supporting this view and illustrates the sensitivity of the results concerning the [Mg/Al] ratio on the rate of the reaction Na(23)(p,\gamma)Mg(24).
  • Stellar evolution models of massive stars are important for many areas of astrophysics, for example nucleosynthesis yields, supernova progenitor models and understanding physics under extreme conditions. Turbulence occurs in stars primarily due to nuclear burning at different mass coordinates within the star. The understanding and correct treatment of turbulence and turbulent mixing at convective boundaries in stellar models has been studied for decades but still lacks a definitive solution. This paper presents initial results of a study on convective boundary mixing (CBM) in massive stars. The 'stiffness' of a convective boundary can be quantified using the bulk Richardson number ($\textrm{Ri}_B$), the ratio of the potential energy for restoration of the boundary to the kinetic energy of turbulent eddies. A 'stiff' boundary ($\textrm{Ri}_B \sim 10^4$) will suppress CBM, whereas in the opposite case a 'soft' boundary ($\textrm{Ri}_B \sim 10$) will be more susceptible to CBM. One of the key results obtained so far is that lower convective boundaries (closer to the centre) of nuclear burning shells are 'stiffer' than the corresponding upper boundaries, implying limited CBM at lower shell boundaries. This is in agreement with 3D hydrodynamic simulations carried out by Meakin and Arnett [The Astrophysical Journal 667:448-475, 2007]. This result also has implications for new CBM prescriptions in massive stars as well as for nuclear burning flame front propagation in Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and also the onset of novae.
  • Rotation was shown to have a strong impact on the structure and light element nucleosynthesis in massive stars. In particular, models including rotation can reproduce the primary nitrogen observed in halo extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. Additional exploratory models showed that rotation may enhance $s$-process production at low metallicity. Here we present a large grid of massive star models including rotation and a full $s$-process network to study the impact of rotation on the weak $s$-process. We explore the possibility of producing significant amounts of elements beyond the strontium peak, which is where the weak $s$-process usually stops. We used the Geneva stellar evolution code coupled to an enlarged reaction network with 737 nuclear species up to bismuth to calculate $15-40\,\text{M}_\odot$ models at four metallicities ($Z = 0.014,10^{-3}$, $10^{-5}$, and $10^{-7}$) from the main sequence up to the end of oxygen burning. We confirm that rotation-induced mixing between the convective H-shell and He-core enables an important production of primary $^{14}$N and $^{22}$Ne and $s$-process at low metallicity. At low metallicity, even though the production is still limited by the initial number of iron seeds, rotation enhances the $s$-process production, even for isotopes heavier than strontium, by increasing the neutron to seed ratio. The increase in this ratio is a direct consequence of the primary production of $^{22}$Ne. Despite nuclear uncertainties affecting the $s$-process production and stellar uncertainties affecting the rotation-induced mixing, our results show a robust production of $s$ process at low metallicity when rotation is taken into account. Considering models with a distribution of initial rotation rates enables to reproduce the observed large range of the [Sr/Ba] ratios in (carbon-enhanced and normal) EMP stars.
  • Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, as they are advanced stages of the life of massive stars, provide a good test for various physical processes involved in the modelling of massive stars, such as rotation and mass loss. In this paper, we show the outputs of the latest grids of single massive stars computed with the Geneva stellar evolution code, and compare them with some observations. We present a short discussion on the shortcomings of single stars models and we also briefly discuss the impact of binarity on the WR populations.
  • The discovery of 150 - 300 M$_{\odot}$ stars in the Local Group and pair-instability supernova candidates at low redshifts has excited interest in this exotic explosion mechanism. Realistic light curves for pair-instability supernovae at near-solar metallicities are key to identifying and properly interpreting these events as more are found. We have modeled pair-instability supernovae of 150 - 500 M$_{\odot}$ Z $\sim$ 0.1 - 0.4 Z$_{\odot}$ stars. These stars lose up to 80% of their mass to strong line-driven winds and explode as bare He cores. We find that their light curves and spectra are quite different from those of Population III pair-instability explosions, which therefore cannot be used as templates for low-redshift events. Although non-zero metallicity pair-instability supernovae are generally dimmer than their Population III counterparts, in some cases they will be bright enough to be detected at the earliest epochs at which they can occur, the formation of the first galaxies at $z \sim$ 10 - 15. Others can masquerade as dim, short duration supernovae that are only visible in the local universe and that under the right conditions could be hidden in a wide variety of supernova classes. We also report for the first time that some pair-instability explosions can create black holes with masses of $\sim$ 100 M$_{\odot}$.
  • In this chapter, after a brief introduction and overview of stellar evolution, we discuss the evolution and nucleosynthesis of very massive stars (VMS: M>100 solar masses) in the context of recent stellar evolution model calculations. This chapter covers the following aspects: general properties, evolution of surface properties, late central evolution, and nucleosynthesis including their dependence on metallicity, mass loss and rotation. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the main-sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All VMS at metallicities close to solar end their life as WC(-WO) type Wolf-Rayet stars. Due to very important mass loss through stellar winds, these stars may have luminosities during the advanced phases of their evolution similar to stars with initial masses between 60 and 120 solar masses. A distinctive feature which may be used to disentangle Wolf-Rayet stars originating from VMS from those originating from lower initial masses is the enhanced abundances of neon and magnesium at the surface of WC stars. At solar metallicity, mass loss is so strong that even if a star is born with several hundred solar masses, it will end its life with less than 50 solar masses (using current mass loss prescriptions). At the metallicity of the LMC and lower, on the other hand, mass loss is weaker and might enable star to undergo pair-instability supernovae.
  • We investigate the enrichment in elements produced by the slow neutron-capture process ($s$-process) in the globular clusters M4 (NGC 6121) and M22 (NGC 6656). Stars in M4 have homogeneous abundances of Fe and neutron-capture elements, but the entire cluster is enhanced in $s$-process elements (Sr, Y, Ba, Pb) relative to other clusters with a similar metallicity. In M22, two stellar groups exhibit different abundances of Fe and $s$-process elements. By subtracting the mean abundances of $s$-poor from $s$-rich stars, we derive $s$-process residuals or empirical $s$-process distributions for M4 and M22. We find that the $s$-process distribution in M22 is more weighted toward the heavy $s$-peak (Ba, La, Ce) and Pb than M4, which has been enriched mostly with light $s$-peak elements (Sr, Y, Zr). We construct simple chemical evolution models using yields from massive star models that include rotation, which dramatically increases $s$-process production at low metallicity. We show that our massive star models with rotation rates of up to 50\% of the critical (break-up) velocity and changes to the preferred $^{17}$O($\alpha$,$\gamma$)$^{21}$Ne rate produce insufficient heavy $s$-elements and Pb to match the empirical distributions. For models that incorporate AGB yields, we find that intermediate-mass yields (with a $^{22}$Ne neutron source) alone do not reproduce the light-to-heavy $s$-element ratios for M4 and M22, and that a small contribution from models with a $^{13}$C pocket is required. With our assumption that $^{13}$C pockets form for initial masses below a transition range between 3.0 and 3.5 M$_\odot$, we match the light-to-heavy s-element ratio in the s-process residual of M22 and predict a minimum enrichment timescale of between 240 and 360 Myr. Our predicted value is consistent with the 300 Myr upper limit age difference between the two groups derived from isochrone fitting.
  • (shortened) We provide a grid of single star models covering a mass range from 0.8 to 120 Msun with an initial metallicity Z = 0.002 with and without rotation. We discuss the impact of a change in the metallicity by comparing the current tracks with models computed with exactly the same physical ingredients but with a metallicity Z = 0.014 (solar). We show that the width of the main-sequence (MS) band in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD), for luminosity above log(L/Lsun) > 5.5, is very sensitive to rotational mixing. Strong mixing significantly reduces the MS width. We confirm, but here for the first time on the whole mass range, that surface enrichments are stronger at low metallicity provided that comparisons are made for equivalent initial mass, rotation and evolutionary stage. We show that the enhancement factor due to a lowering of the metallicity (all other factors kept constant) increases when the initial mass decreases. Present models predict an upper luminosity for the red supergiants (RSG) of log (L/Lsun) around 5.5 at Z = 0.002 in agreement with the observed upper limit of RSG in the Small Magellanic Cloud. We show that models using shear diffusion coefficient calibrated to reproduce the surface enrichments observed for MS B-type stars at Z = 0.014 can also reproduce the stronger enrichments observed at low metallicity. In the framework of the present models, we discuss the factors governing the timescale of the first crossing of the Hertzsprung gap after the MS phase. We show that any process favouring a deep localisation of the H-burning shell (steep gradient at the border of the H-burning convective core, low CNO content) and/or the low opacity of the H-rich envelope favour a blue position in the HRD for the whole or at least a significant fraction of the core He-burning phase.
  • There is observational evidence that supports the existence of Very Massive Stars in the local universe. First, very massive stars (Mini<=320 M) have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud . Second, there are observed SNe that bear the characteristics of Pair Creation Supernovae which have very massive stars as progenitors. The most promising candidate to date is SN2007bi. In order to investigate the evolution and fate of nearby very massive stars, we calculated a new grid of models for such objects, for solar, LMC and SMC metallicities, which covers the initial mass range from 120 to 500M. Both rotating and non-rotating models were calculated using the Geneva stellar evolution code and evolved until at least the end of helium burning and for most models until oxygen burning. Since very massive stars have very large convective cores during the Main-Sequence phase, their evolution is not so much affected by rotational mixing, but more by mass loss through stellar winds. Their evolution is never far from a homogeneous evolution even without rotational mixing. All the VMS, at all the metallicities studied here, end their life as WC(WO) type stars. At solar metallicity, none of our models is expected to explode as a PCSN. At the metallicity of the LMC, only stars more massive than 300 M are expected to explode as PCSNe. At the SMC metallicity, the mass range for the PCSN progenitors is much larger and comprises stars with initial masses between about 100 and 290 M . All VMS stars in the metallicity range studied here produce either a type Ib or a type Ic SN. We estimate that the progenitor of SN2007bi, assuming a SMC metallicity, had an initial mass between 160 and 175 M . None of models presented in this grid produce GRBs or magnetars. They lose too much angular momentum by mass loss or avoid the formation of a BH by producing a completely disruptive PCSN.
  • Very old halo stars were previously found to show at least four different abundance 'anomalies', which models of fast rotating massive stars (spinstars) can successfully account for: rise of N/O and C/O, low 12C/13C and a primary-like evolution of Be and B. Here we show the impact of these same stars in the enrichment of Sr and Ba in the early Universe. We study if the s-process production of fast rotating massive stars can offer an explanation for the observed spread in [Sr/Ba] ratio in halo stars with metallicity [Fe/H]< -2.5. By means of a chemical inhomogeneous model we compute the enrichment of Sr and Ba by massive stars in the Galactic halo. Our model takes into account, for the first time, the contribution of spinstars. Our model (combining an r-process contribution with a s-process from fast rotating massive stars) is able to reproduce for the first time the observed scatter in the [Sr/Ba] ratio at [Fe/H]< -2.5. Toward higher metallicities, the stochasticity of the star formation fades away due to the increasing number of exploding and enriching stars, and as a consequence the predicted scatter decreases. Our scenario is again based on the existence of spinstars in the early Universe. Very old halo stars were previously found to show at least four other abundance 'anomalies', which rotating models of massive stars can successfully account for. Our results provide a 5th independent signature of the existence of fast rotating massive stars: an early enrichment of the Universe in s-process elements.
  • We used a recent grid of stellar models computed with and without rotation to make predictions concerning the WR populations and the frequency of different types of core-collapse SNe. Current rotating models were checked to provide good fits to the following features: solar luminosity and radius at the solar age, main-sequence width, red-giant and red-supergiant (RSG) positions in the HRD, surface abundances, and rotational velocities. Rotating stellar models predict that about half of the observed WR stars and at least half of the type Ibc SNe may be produced through the single-star evolution channel. Rotation increases the duration of the WNL and WNC phases, while reducing those of the WNE and WC phases, as was already shown in previous works. Rotation increases the frequency of type Ic SNe. The upper mass limit for type II-P SNe is \sim 19.0 MSun for the non rotating models and \sim 16.8 MSun for the rotating ones. Both values agree with observations. Moreover, present rotating models provide a very good fit to the progenitor of SN 2008ax. We discuss future directions of research for further improving the agreement between the models and the observations. We conclude that the mass-loss rates in the WNL and RSG phases are probably underestimated at present. We show that up to an initial mass of 40 M\odot, a surface magnetic field inferior to about 200 G may be sufficient to produce some braking. Much lower values are needed at the red supergiant stage. We suggest that the presence/absence of any magnetic braking effect may play a key role in questions regarding rotation rates of young pulsars and the evolution leading to LGRBs.