• Non-orthogonal multiple access (NoMA) as an efficient way of radio resource sharing can root back to the network information theory. For generations of wireless communication systems design, orthogonal multiple access (OMA) schemes in time, frequency, or code domain have been the main choices due to the limited processing capability in the transceiver hardware, as well as the modest traffic demands in both latency and connectivity. However, for the next generation radio systems, given its vision to connect everything and the much evolved hardware capability, NoMA has been identified as a promising technology to help achieve all the targets in system capacity, user connectivity, and service latency. This article will provide a systematic overview of the state-of-the-art design of the NoMA transmission based on a unified transceiver design framework, the related standardization progress, and some promising use cases in future cellular networks, based on which the interested researchers can get a quick start in this area.
  • A novel technique is proposed which enables each transmitter to acquire global channel state information (CSI) from the sole knowledge of individual received signal power measurements, which makes dedicated feedback or inter-transmitter signaling channels unnecessary. To make this possible, we resort to a completely new technique whose key idea is to exploit the transmit power levels as symbols to embed information and the observed interference as a communication channel the transmitters can use to exchange coordination information. Although the used technique allows any kind of {low-rate} information to be exchanged among the transmitters, the focus here is to exchange local CSI. The proposed procedure also comprises a phase which allows local CSI to be estimated. Once an estimate of global CSI is acquired by the transmitters, it can be used to optimize any utility function which depends on it. While algorithms which use the same type of measurements such as the iterative water-filling algorithm (IWFA) implement the sequential best-response dynamics (BRD) applied to individual utilities, here, thanks to the availability of global CSI, the BRD can be applied to the sum-utility. Extensive numerical results show that significant gains can be obtained and, this, by requiring no additional online signaling.