• The central regions of nearby elliptical galaxies are dominated by baryons (stars) and provide interesting laboratories for studying the radial acceleration relation (RAR). We carry out exploratory analyses and discuss the possibility of constraining the RAR in the super-critical acceleration range $(10^{-9.5},\hspace{1ex}10^{-8})$~${\rm m}~{\rm s}^{-2}$ using a sample of nearly round pure-bulge (spheroidal, dispersion-dominated) galaxies including 24 ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ galaxies and 4201 SDSS galaxies covering a wide range of masses, sizes and luminosity density profiles. We consider a range of current possibilities for the stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M_\star/L$), its gradient and dark or phantom matter (DM/PM) halo profiles. We obtain the probability density functions (PDFs) of the parameters of the considered models via Bayesian inference based on spherical Jeans Monte Carlo modeling of the observed velocity dispersions. We then constrain the DM/PM-to-baryon acceleration ratio $a_{\rm X}/a_{\rm B}$ from the PDFs. Unless we ignore observed radial gradients in $M_\star/L$, or assume unreasonably strong gradients, marginalization over nuisance factors suggests $a_{\rm X}/a_{\rm B} = 10^{p} (a_{\rm B}/a_{+1})^q$ with $p = -1.00 \pm 0.03$ (stat) $^{+0.11}_{-0.06}$ (sys) and $q=-1.02 \pm 0.09$ (stat) $^{+0.16}_{-0.00}$ (sys) around a super-critical acceleration $a_{+1}\equiv 1.2\times 10^{-9}~{\rm m}~{\rm s}^{-2}$. In the context of the $\Lambda$CDM paradigm, this RAR suggests that the NFW DM halo profile is a reasonable description of galactic halos even after the processes of galaxy formation and evolution. In the context of the MOND paradigm, this RAR favors the Simple interpolating function but is inconsistent with the vast majority of other theoretical proposals and fitting functions motivated mainly from sub-critical acceleration data.
  • We carry out spherical Jeans modeling of nearly round pure-bulge galaxies selected from the ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ sample. Our modeling allows for gradients in the stellar mass-to-light ratio ($M_\star/L$) through analytic prescriptions parameterized with a `gradient strength' $K$ introduced to accommodate any viable gradient. We use a generalized Osipkov-Merritt model for the velocity dispersion (VD) anisotropy. We produce Monte Carlo sets of models based on the stellar VD profiles under both the $\Lambda$CDM and MOND paradigms. Here we describe the galaxy data, the empirical inputs, and the modeling procedures of obtaining the Monte Carlo sets. We then present the projected dynamical stellar mass, $M_{\rm \star e}$, within the effective radius $R_{\rm e}$, and the fundamental mass plane (FMP) as a function of $K$. We find the scaling of the $K$-dependent mass with respect to the ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ reported mass as: $\log_{10} \left[M_{\star{\rm e}}(K)/M_{\star{\rm e}}^{\rm A3D} \right] = a' + b' K$ with $a'=-0.019\pm 0.012$ and $b'=-0.18\pm 0.02$ ($\Lambda$CDM), or $a'=-0.023\pm 0.014$ and $b'=-0.23\pm 0.03$ (MOND), for $0\le K < 1.5$. The FMP has coefficients consistent with the virial expectation and only the zero point scales with $K$. The median value of $K$ for the ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ galaxies is $\langle K\rangle =0.53^{+0.05}_{-0.04}$. We perform a similar analysis of the much larger SDSS DR7 spectroscopic sample. In this case, the VD within a single aperture is only available, so we impose the additional requirement that the VD slope be similar to that in the ATLAS$^{\rm 3D}$ galaxies. Our analysis of the SDSS galaxies suggests a positive correlation of $K$ with stellar mass.
  • We use a 200 $h^{-1}Mpc$ a side N-body simulation to study the mass accretion history (MAH) of dark matter halos to be accreted by larger halos, which we call infall halos. We define a quantity $a_{\rm nf}\equiv (1+z_{\rm f})/(1+z_{\rm peak})$ to characterize the MAH of infall halos, where $z_{\rm peak}$ and $z_{\rm f}$ are the accretion and formation redshifts, respectively. We find that, at given $z_{\rm peak}$, their MAH is bimodal. Infall halos are dominated by a young population at high redshift and by an old population at low redshift. For the young population, the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution is narrow and peaks at about $1.2$, independent of $z_{\rm peak}$, while for the old population, the peak position and width of the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution both increases with decreasing $z_{\rm peak}$ and are both larger than those of the young population. This bimodal distribution is found to be closely connected to the two phases in the MAHs of halos. While members of the young population are still in the fast accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$, those of the old population have already entered the slow accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$. This bimodal distribution is not found for the whole halo population, nor is it seen in halo merger trees generated with the extended Press-Schechter formalism. The infall halo population at $z_{\rm peak}$ are, on average, younger than the whole halo population of similar masses identified at the same redshift. We discuss the implications of our findings in connection to the bimodal color distribution of observed galaxies and to the link between central and satellite galaxies.
  • The excursion set approach is a framework for estimating how the number density of nonlinear structures in the cosmic web depends on the expansion history of the universe and the nature of gravity. A key part of the approach is the estimation of the first crossing distribution of a suitably chosen barrier by random walks having correlated steps: The shape of the barrier is determined by the physics of nonlinear collapse, and the correlations between steps by the nature of the initial density fluctuation field. We describe analytic and numerical methods for calculating such first up-crossing distributions. While the exact solution can be written formally as an infinite series, we show how to approximate it efficiently using the Stratonovich approximation. We demonstrate its accuracy using Monte-Carlo realizations of the walks, which we generate using a novel Cholesky-decomposition based algorithm, which is significantly faster than the algorithm that is currently in the literature.
  • Due to late time non-linearities, the location of the acoustic peak in the two-point galaxy correlation function is a redshift-dependent quantity, thus it cannot be simply employed as a cosmological standard ruler. This has motivated the recent proposal of a novel ruler, also located in the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation range of scales of the correlation function, dubbed the "linear point". Unlike the peak, it is insensitive at the $0.5\%$ level to many of the non-linear effects that distort the clustering correlation function and shift the peak. However, this is not enough to make the linear point a useful standard ruler. In addition, we require a model-independent method to estimate its value from real data, avoiding the need to deploy a poorly known non-linear model of the correlation function. In this manuscript, we precisely validate a procedure for model-independent estimation of the linear point. We also identify the optimal set-up to estimate the linear point from the correlation function using galaxy catalogs. The methodology developed here is of general validity, and can be applied to any galaxy correlation-function data. As a working example, we apply this procedure to the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples of the Twelfth Data Release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), for which the estimates of cosmic distances using the linear point have been presented in Anselmi et al. (2017) [1].
  • We show how a characteristic length scale imprinted in the galaxy two-point correlation function, dubbed the "linear point", can serve as a comoving cosmological standard ruler. In contrast to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation peak location, this scale is constant in redshift and is unaffected by non-linear effects to within $0.5$ percent precision. We measure the location of the linear point in the galaxy correlation function of the LOWZ and CMASS samples from the Twelfth Data Release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) collaboration. We combine our linear-point measurement with cosmic-microwave-background constraints from the Planck satellite to estimate the isotropic-volume distance $D_{V}(z)$, without relying on a model-template or reconstruction method. We find $D_V(0.32)=1264\pm 28$ Mpc and $D_V(0.57)=2056\pm 22$ Mpc respectively, consistent with the quoted values from the BOSS collaboration. This remarkable result suggests that all the distance information contained in the baryon acoustic oscillations can be conveniently compressed into the single length associated with the linear point.
  • Recent work has confirmed that the masses of supermassive black holes, estimated from scaling relations with global properties such as the stellar masses of their host galaxies, may be biased high. Much of this may be caused by the requirement that the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole must be resolved for the black-hole mass to be reliably estimated. We revisit this issue by using a comprehensive galaxy evolution semi-analytic model, which self-consistently evolves supermassive black holes from high-redshift seeds via gas accretion and mergers, and also includes AGN feedback. Once tuned to reproduce the (mean) correlation of black-hole mass with velocity dispersion, the model is unable to also account for the correlation with stellar mass. This behaviour is independent of the model's parameters, thus suggesting an internal inconsistency in the data. The predicted distributions, especially at the low-mass end, are also much broader than observed. However, if selection effects are included, the model's predictions tend to align with the observations. We also demonstrate that the correlations between the residuals of the local scaling relations are more effective than the scaling relations themselves at constraining AGN feedback models. In fact, we find that our semi-analytic model, while in apparent broad agreement with the scaling relations when accounting for selection biases, yields very weak correlations between their residuals at fixed stellar mass, in stark contrast with observations. This problem persists when changing the AGN feedback strength, and is also present in the $z\sim 0$ outputs of the hydrodynamic cosmological simulation Horizon-AGN, which includes state-of-the-art treatments of AGN feedback. This suggests that current AGN feedback models may be too weak or are simply not capturing the effect of the black hole on the stellar velocity dispersion.
  • The protohalo patches from which halos form are defined by a number of constraints imposed on the Lagrangian dark matter density field. Each of these constraints contributes to biasing the spatial distribution of the protohalos relative to the matter. We show how measurements of this spatial distribution -- linear combinations of protohalo bias factors -- can be used to make inferences about the physics of halo formation. Our analysis exploits the fact that halo bias factors satisfy consistency relations which encode this physics, and that these relations are the same even for sub-populations in which assembly bias has played a role. We illustrate our methods using a model in which three parameters matter: a density threshold, the local slope and the curvature of the smoothed density field. The latter two are nearly degenerate; our approach naturally allows one to build an accurate effective two-parameter model for which the consistency relations still apply. This, with an accurate description of the smoothing window, allows one to describe the protohalo-matter cross-correlation very well, both in Fourier and configuration space. We then use our determination of the large scale bias parameters together with the consistency relations, to estimate the enclosed density and mean slope on the Lagrangian radius scale of the protohalos. Direct measurements of these quantities, made on smaller scales than those on which the bias parameters are typically measured, are in good agreement.
  • We propose a new way of looking at the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the Large Scale Structure clustering correlation function. We identify a scale s_LP that has two fundamental features: its position is insensitive to non-linear gravity, redshift space distortions, and scale-dependent bias at the 0.5% level; it is geometrical, i.e. independent of the power spectrum of the primordial density fluctuation parameters. These two properties together make s_LP, called the "linear point", an excellent cosmological standard ruler. The linear point is also appealing because it is easily identified irrespectively of how non-linearities distort the correlation function. Finally, the correlation function amplitude at s_LP is similarly insensitive to non-linear corrections to within a few percent. Hence, exploiting the particular Baryon features in the correlation function, we propose three new estimators for growth measurements. A preliminary analysis of s_LP in current data is encouraging.
  • Mass around dark matter halos can be divided into "infalling" material and "collapsed" material that has passed through at least one pericenter. Analytical models and simulations predict a rapid drop in the halo density profile associated with the transition between these two regimes. Using data from SDSS, we explore the evidence for such a feature in the density profiles of galaxy clusters and investigate the connection between this feature and a possible phase space boundary. We first estimate the steepening of the outer galaxy density profile around clusters: the profiles show an abrupt steepening, providing evidence for truncation of the halo profile. Next, we measure the galaxy density profile around clusters using two sets of galaxies selected based on color. We find evidence of an abrupt change in the galaxy colors that coincides with the location of the steepening of the density profile. Since galaxies are likely to be quenched of star formation and turn red inside of clusters, this change in the galaxy color distribution can be interpreted as the transition from an infalling regime to a collapsed regime. We also measure this transition using a model comparison approach which has been used recently in studies of the "splashback" phenomenon, but find that this approach is not a robust way to quantify the significance of detecting a splashback-like feature. Finally, we perform measurements using an independent cluster catalog to test for potential systematic errors associated with cluster selection. We identify several avenues for future work: improved understanding of the small-scale galaxy profile, lensing measurements, identification of proxies for the halo accretion rate, and other tests. With upcoming data from the DES, KiDS and HSC surveys, we can expect significant improvements in the study of halo boundaries.
  • Cross-correlations between biased tracers and the dark matter field encode information about the physical variables which characterize these tracers. However, if the physical variables of interest are correlated with one another, then extracting this information is not as straightforward as one might naively have thought. We show how to exploit these correlations so as to estimate scale-independent bias factors of all orders in a model-independent way. We also show that failure to account for this will lead to incorrect conclusions about which variables matter and which do not. Morever, accounting for this allows one to use the scale dependence of bias to constrain the physics of halo formation; to date the argument has been phrased the other way around. We illustrate by showing that the scale dependence of linear and nonlinear bias, measured on nonlinear scales, can be used to provide consistent estimates of how the critical density for halo formation depends on halo mass. Our methods work even when the bias is nonlocal and stochastic, such as when, in addition to the spherically averaged density field and its derivatives, the quadrupolar shear field also matters for halo formation. In such models, the nonlocal bias factors are closely related to the more familiar local nonlinear bias factors, which are much easier to measure. Our analysis emphasizes the fact that biased tracers are biased because they do not sample fields (density, velocity, shear, etc.) at all positions in space in the same way that the dark matter does.
  • Recent analytical work on the modelling of dark halo abundances and clustering has demonstrated the advantages of combining the excursion set approach with peaks theory. We extend these ideas and introduce a model of excursion set peaks that incorporates the role of initial tidal effects or shear in determining the gravitational collapse of dark haloes. The model -- in which the critical density threshold for collapse depends on the tidal influences acting on protohaloes -- is well motivated from ellipsoidal collapse arguments and is also simple enough to be analytically tractable. We show that the predictions of this model are in very good agreement with measurements of the halo mass function and traditional scale dependent halo bias in N-body simulations across a wide range of masses and redshift. The presence of shear in the collapse threshold means that halo bias is naturally predicted to be nonlocal, and that protohalo densities at fixed mass are naturally predicted to have Lognormal-like distributions. We present the first direct estimate of Lagrangian nonlocal bias in N-body simulations, finding broad agreement with the model prediction. Finally, the simplicity of the model (which has essentially a single free parameter) opens the door to building efficient and accurate non-universal fitting functions of halo abundances and bias for use in precision cosmology.
  • The window function for protohalos in Lagrangian space is often assumed to be a tophat in real space. We measure this profile directly and find that it is more extended than a tophat but less extended than a Gaussian; its shape is well-described by rounding the edges of the tophat by convolution with a Gaussan that has a scale length about 5 times smaller. This effective window $W_{\rm eff}$ is particularly simple in Fourier space, and has an analytic form in real space. Together with the excursion set bias parameters, $W_{\rm eff}$ describes the scale-dependence of the Lagrangian halo-matter cross correlation up to $kR_{\rm Lag} \sim 10 $, where $R_{\rm Lag}$ is the Lagrangian size of the protohalo. Moreover, with this $W_{\rm eff}$, all the spectral moments of the power spectrum are finite. While this simplifies analysis of the excursion set peak model, the predicted mass function which results is significantly lower, and hence appreciably lower than in simulations for halos of mass $\lesssim 10^{14} M_{\odot}/h $.
  • The abundance of galaxy clusters can constrain both the geometry and growth of structure in our Universe. However, this probe could be significantly complicated by recent claims of nonuniversality -- non-trivial dependences with respect to the cosmological model and redshift. In this work we analyse the dependance of the mass function on the way haloes are identified and establish if this can cause departures from universality. In order to explore this dependance, we use a set of different N-body cosmological simulations (Le SBARBINE simulations), with the latest cosmological parameters from the Planck collaboration; this first suite of simulations is followed by a lower resolution set, carried out with different cosmological parameters. We identify dark matter haloes using a Spherical Overdensity algorithm with varying overdensity thresholds (virial, 2000rho_c, 1000rho_c, 500rho_c, 200rho_c and 200rho_b) at all redshifts. We notice that, when expressed in term of the rescaled variable nu, the mass functionfor virial haloes is a nearly universal as a function of redshift and cosmology, while this is clearly not the case for the other overdensities we considered. We provide fitting functions for the halo mass function parameters as a function of overdensity, that allow to predict, to within a few percent accuracy, the halo mass function for a wide range of halo definitions, redshifts and cosmological models. We then show how the departures from universality associated with other halo definitions can be derived by combining the universality of the virial definition with the expected shape of the density profile of halos.
  • The excursion set approach uses the statistics of the density field smoothed on a wide range of scales, to gain insight into a number of interesting processes in nonlinear structure formation, such as cluster assembly, merging and clustering. The approach treats the curve defined by the height of the overdensity fluctuation field when changing the smoothing scale as a random walk. The steps of the walks are often assumed to be uncorrelated, so that the walk heights are a Markov process, even though this assumption is known to be inaccurate for physically relevant filters. We develop a model in which the walk steps, rather than heights, are a Markov process, and correlations between steps arise because of nearest neighbour interactions. This model is a particular case of a general class, which we call Markov Velocity models. We show how these can approximate the walks generated by arbitrary power spectra and filters, and, unlike walks with Markov heights, provide a very good approximation to physically relevant models. We define a Markov Velocity Monte Carlo algorithm to generate walks whose first crossing distribution is very similar to that of TopHat-smoothed LCDM walks. Finally, we demonstrate that Markov Velocity walks generically exhibit a simple but realistic form of assembly bias, so we expect them to be useful in the construction of more realistic merger history trees.
  • The simplest stochastic halo formation models assume that the traceless part of the shear field acts to increase the initial overdensity (or decrease the underdensity) that a protohalo (or protovoid) must have if it is to form by the present time. Equivalently, it is the difference between the overdensity and (the square root of the) shear that must be larger than a threshold value. To estimate the effect this has on halo abundances using the excursion set approach, we must solve for the first crossing distribution of a barrier of constant height by the random walks associated with the difference, which is now (even for Gaussian initial conditions) a non-Gaussian variate. The correlation properties of such non-Gaussian walks are inherited from those of the density and the shear, and, since they are independent processes, the solution is in fact remarkably simple. We show that this provides an easy way to understand why earlier heuristic arguments about the nature of the solution worked so well. In addition to modelling halos and voids, this potentially simplifies models of the abundance and spatial distribution of filaments and sheets in the cosmic web.
  • We examine the two-point correlation function of local maxima in temperature fluctuations at the last scattering surface when this stochastic field is modified by the additional fluctuations produced by straight cosmic strings via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We demonstrate that one can detect the imprint of cosmic strings with tension $G\mu \gtrsim 1.2 \times 10^{-8}$ on noiseless $1^\prime$ resolution cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps at 95% confidence interval. Including the effects of foregrounds and anticipated systematic errors increases the lower bound to $G\mu \gtrsim 9.0\times 10^{-8}$ at $2\sigma$ confidence level. Smearing by beams of order 4' degrades the bound further to $G\mu \gtrsim 1.6 \times 10^{-7}$. Our results indicate that two-point statistics are more powerful than 1-point statistics (e.g. number counts) for identifying the non-Gaussianity in the CMB due to straight cosmic strings.
  • Recently, we provided a simple but accurate formula which closely approximates the first crossing distribution associated with random walks having correlated steps. The approximation is accurate for the wide range of barrier shapes of current interest and is based on the requirement that, in addition to having the right height, the walk must cross the barrier going upwards. Therefore, it only requires knowledge of the bivariate distribution of the walk height and slope, and is particularly useful for excursion set models of the massive end of the halo mass function. However, it diverges at lower masses. We show how to cure this divergence by using a formulation which requires knowledge of just one other variable. While our analysis is general, we use examples based on Gaussian initial conditions to illustrate our results. Our formulation, which is simple and fast, yields excellent agreement with the considerably more computationally expensive Monte-Carlo solution of the first crossing distribution, for a wide variety of moving barriers, even at very low masses.
  • Halos are biased tracers of the dark matter distribution. It is often assumed that the patches from which halos formed are locally biased with respect to the initial fluctuation field, meaning that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in that of the dark matter. If quantities other than the local density influence halo formation, then this Lagrangian bias will generically be nonlocal; the Taylor series must be performed with respect to these other variables as well. We illustrate the effect with Monte-Carlo simulations of a model in which halo formation depends on the local shear (the quadrupole of perturbation theory), and provide an analytic model which provides a good description of our results. Our model, which extends the excursion set approach to walks in more than one dimension, works both when steps in the walk are uncorrelated, as well as when there are correlations between steps. For walks with correlated steps, our model includes two distinct types of nonlocality: one is due to the fact that the initial density profile around a patch which is destined to form a halo must fall sufficiently steeply around it -- this introduces k-dependence to even the linear bias factor, but otherwise only affects the monopole of the clustering signal. The other is due to the surrounding shear field; this affects the quadratic and higher order bias factors, and introduces an angular dependence to the clustering signal. In both cases, our analysis shows that these nonlocal Lagrangian bias terms can be significant, particularly for massive halos; they must be accounted for in analyses of higher order clustering such as the halo bispectrum in Lagrangian or Eulerian space. Although we illustrate these effects using halos, our analysis and conclusions also apply to the other constituents of the cosmic web -- filaments, sheets and voids.
  • We analyze environmental correlations using mark clustering statistics with the mock galaxy catalogue constructed by Muldrew et al. (Paper I). We find that mark correlation functions are able to detect even a small dependence of galaxy properties on the environment, quantified by the overdensity $1+\delta$, while such a small dependence would be difficult to detect by traditional methods. We then show that rank ordering the marks and using the rank as a weight is a simple way of comparing the correlation signals for different marks. With this we quantify to what extent fixed-aperture overdensities are sensitive to large-scale halo environments, nearest-neighbor overdensities are sensitive to small-scale environments within haloes, and colour is a better tracer of overdensity than is luminosity.
  • Motivated by the recent detection of an enhanced clustering signal along the major axis of haloes in N-body simulations, we derive a formula for the anisotropic density distribution around haloes and voids on large scales. Our model, which assumes linear theory and that the formation and orientation of nonlinear structures are strongly correlated with the Lagrangian shear, is in good agreement with measurements. We also show that the measured amplitude is inconsistent with a model in which the alignment is produced by the initial inertia rather than shear tensor.
  • If one accounts for correlations between scales, then nonlocal, k-dependent halo bias is part and parcel of the excursion set approach, and hence of halo model predictions for galaxy bias. We present an analysis that distinguishes between a number of different effects, each one of which contributes to scale-dependent bias in real space. We show how to isolate these effects and remove the scale dependence, order by order, by cross-correlating the halo field with suitably transformed versions of the mass field. These transformations may be thought of as simple one-point, two-scale measurements that allow one to estimate quantities which are usually constrained using n-point statistics. As part of our analysis, we present a simple analytic approximation for the first crossing distribution of walks with correlated steps which are constrained to pass through a specified point, and demonstrate its accuracy. Although we concentrate on nonlinear, nonlocal bias with respect to a Gaussian random field, we show how to generalize our analysis to more general fields.
  • We present a fast method of producing mock galaxy catalogues that can be used to compute covariance matrices of large-scale clustering measurements and test the methods of analysis. Our method populates a 2nd-order Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (2LPT) matter field, where we calibrate masses of dark matter halos by detailed comparisons with N-body simulations. We demonstrate the clustering of halos is recovered at ~10 per cent accuracy. We populate halos with mock galaxies using a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) prescription, which has been calibrated to reproduce the clustering measurements on scales between 30 and 80 Mpc/h. We compare the sample covariance matrix from our mocks with analytic estimates, and discuss differences. We have used this method to make catalogues corresponding to Data Release 9 of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS),producing 600 mock catalogues of the "CMASS" galaxy sample. These mocks enabled detailed tests of methods and errors that formed an integral part of companion analyses of these galaxy data.
  • The relationship between galaxy and matter overdensities, bias, is most often assumed to be local. This is however unstable under time evolution, we provide proofs under several sets of assumptions. In the simplest model galaxies are created locally and linearly biased at a single time, and subsequently move with the matter (no velocity bias) conserving their comoving number density (no merging). We show that, after this formation time, the bias becomes unavoidably non-local and non-linear at large scales. We identify the non-local gravitationally induced fields in which the galaxy overdensity can be expanded, showing that they can be constructed out of the invariants of the deformation tensor (Galileons). In addition, we show that this result persists if we include an arbitrary evolution of the comoving number density of tracers. We then include velocity bias, and show that new contributions appear, a dipole field being the signature at second order. We test these predictions by studying the dependence of halo overdensities in cells of fixed matter density: measurements in simulations show that departures from the mean bias relation are strongly correlated with the non-local gravitationally induced fields identified by our formalism. The effects on non-local bias seen in the simulations are most important for the most biased halos, as expected from our predictions. The non-locality seen in the simulations is not fully captured by assuming local bias in Lagrangian space. Accounting for these effects when modeling galaxy bias is essential for correctly describing the dependence on triangle shape of the galaxy bispectrum, and hence constraining cosmological parameters and primordial non-Gaussianity. We show that using our formalism we remove an important systematic in the determination of bias parameters from the galaxy bispectrum, particularly for luminous galaxies. (abridged)
  • The coefficients a and b of the Fundamental Plane relation R ~ Sigma^a I^b depend on whether one minimizes the scatter in the R direction or orthogonal to the Plane. We provide explicit expressions for a and b (and confidence limits) in terms of the covariances between logR, logSigma and logI. Our analysis is more generally applicable to any other correlations between three variables: e.g., the color-magnitude-Sigma relation, the L-Sigma-Mbh relation, or the relation between the X-ray luminosity, Sunyaev-Zeldovich decrement and optical richness of a cluster, so we provide IDL code which implements these ideas, and we show how our analysis generalizes further to correlations between more than three variables. We show how to account for correlated errors and selection effects, and quantify the difference between the direct, inverse and orthogonal fit coefficients. We show that the three vectors associated with the Fundamental Plane can all be written as simple combinations of a and b because the distribution of I is much broader than that of Sigma, and Sigma and I are only weakly correlated. Why this should be so for galaxies is a fundamental open question about the physics of early-type galaxy formation. If luminosity evolution is differential, and Rs and Sigmas do not evolve, then this is just an accident: Sigma and I must have been correlated in the past. On the other hand, if the (lack of) correlation is similar to that at the present time, then differential luminosity evolution must have been accompanied by structural evolution. A model in which the luminosities of low-L galaxies evolve more rapidly than do those of higher-L galaxies is able to produce the observed decrease in a (by a factor of 2 at z~1) while having b decrease by only about 20 percent. In such a model, the Mdyn/L ratio is a steeper function of Mdyn at higher z.