• The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is the the next generation facility of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes; two sites will cover both hemispheres. CTA will reach unprecedented sensitivity, energy and angular resolution in very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. Each CTA array will include four Large Size Telescopes (LSTs), designed to cover the low-energy range of the CTA sensitivity ($\sim$20 GeV to 200 GeV). In the baseline LST design, the focal-plane camera will be instrumented with 265 photodetector clusters; each will include seven photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), with an entrance window of 1.5 inches in diameter. The PMT design is based on mature and reliable technology. Recently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are emerging as a competitor. Currently, SiPMs have advantages (e.g. lower operating voltage and tolerance to high illumination levels) and disadvantages (e.g. higher capacitance and cross talk rates), but this technology is still young and rapidly evolving. SiPM technology has a strong potential to become superior to the PMT one in terms of photon detection efficiency and price per square mm of detector area. While the advantage of SiPMs has been proven for high-density, small size cameras, it is yet to be demonstrated for large area cameras such as the one of the LST. We are working to develop a SiPM-based module for the LST camera, in view of a possible camera upgrade. We will describe the solutions we are exploring in order to balance a competitive performance with a minimal impact on the overall LST camera design.
  • So far the current ground-based Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have energy thresholds in the best case in the range of ~30 to 50 GeV (H.E.S.S. II and MAGIC telescopes). Lowest energy gamma-ray showers produce low light intensity images and cannot be efficiently separated from dominating images from hadronic background. A cost effective way of improving the telescope performance at lower energies is to use novel photosensors with superior photon detection efficiency (PDE). Currently the best commercially available superbialkali photomultipliers (PMTs) have a PDE of about 30-33%, whereas the silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs, also known as MPPC, GAPD) from some manufacturers show a photon detection efficiency of about 40-45%. Using these devices can lower the energy threshold of the instrument and may improve the background rejection due to intrinsic properties of SiPMs such as a superb single photoelectron resolution. Compared to PMTs, SiPMs are more compact, fast in response, operate at low voltage, and are insensitive to magnetic fields. SiPMs can be operated at high background illumination, which would allow to operate the IACT also during partial moonlight, dusk and dawn, hence increasing the instrument duty cycle. We are testing the SiPMs for Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and CTA. Here we present an overview of our setup and first measurements, which we perform in two independent laboratories, in Munich, Germany and in Barcelona, Spain.
  • A new method for analyzing the returns of the custom-made 'micro'-LIDAR system, which is operated along with the two MAGIC telescopes, allows to apply atmospheric corrections in the MAGIC data analysis chain. Such corrections make it possible to extend the effective observation time of MAGIC under adverse atmospheric conditions and reduce the systematic errors of energy and flux in the data analysis. LIDAR provides a range-resolved atmospheric backscatter profile from which the extinction of Cherenkov light from air shower events can be estimated. Knowledge of the extinction can allow to reconstruct the true image parameters, including energy and flux. Our final goal is to recover the source-intrinsic energy spectrum also for data affected by atmospheric extinction from aerosol layers, such as clouds.
  • Currently the standard light sensors for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are the classical photo multiplier tubes that are using bialkali photo cathodes. About eight years ago we initiated an improvement program with the Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT) manufacturers Hamamatsu (Japan), Electron Tubes Enterprises (England) and Photonis (France) for the needs of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. As a result, after about 40 years of stagnation of the peak Quantum Efficiency (QE) on the level of 25-27%, new PMTs appeared with a peak QE of 35%. These have got the name super-bialkali. The second significant upgrade has happened very recently, as a result of a dedicated improvement program for the candidate PMT for Cherenkov Telescope Array. The latter is going to be the next generation major instrument in the field of very high energy gamma astrophysics and will consist of over 100 telescopes of three different sizes of 23m, 12m and 4-7m, located both in southern and northern hemispheres. Now PMTs with average peak QE of approximately 40% became available. Also, the photo electron collection efficiency of the previous generation PMTs of 80- 90% has been enhanced towards 95-98% for the new ones. The after-pulsing of novel PMTs has been reduced towards the level of 0.02% for the set threshold of 4 photo electrons. We will report on the PMT development work by the companies Electron Tubes Enterprises and Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. show the achieved results and the current status.
  • Mechanics of the camera for the large size telescopes of CTA must protect and provide a stable environment for its instrumentation. This is achieved by a stiff support structure enclosed in an air and water tight volume. The structure is specially devised to facilitate extracting the power dissipated by the focal plane electronics while keeping its weight small enough to guarantee an optimum load on the telescope structure. A heat extraction system is designed to keep the electronics temperature within its optimal operation range, stable in time and homogeneous along the camera volume, whereas it is decoupled from the temperature in the telescope environment. In this contribution, we present the details of this system as well as its verification based in finite element analysis computations and tested prototypes. Finally, issues related to the integration of the camera mechanics and electronics will be dealt with.
  • Very high energy gamma rays coming from extra-galactic sources can interact with intergalactic radiation fields. This process may result in electromagnetic cascades with the following cycle: the production of electron-positron pairs and then secondary gamma-rays due to inverse Compton scattering. Since electrons and positrons will be scattered in the intergalactic magnetic field, under certain conditions their radiation may be redirected towards the observer. Thus one can anticipate that the secondary gamma-ray emission may produce an apparent extended halo around the source. MAGIC is an Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescope located on Canary island of La Palma at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (2200 m.a.s.l). Various source sizes and extended emission profiles within $1^\circ$ diameter have been studied by using dedicated Monte Carlo simulations for the MAGIC telescope. We present results of the study of a possible extended emission for Mrk 421 and Mrk501 done with the MAGIC telescope.
  • In February 2007 the MAGIC Air Cherenkov Telescope for gamma ray astronomy was fully upgraded with a fast 2 GSamples/s digitization system. The upgraded readout system uses a novel fiber-optic multiplexing technique. It consists of 10-bit 2 GSamples/s FADCs to digitize 16 channels consecutively and optical fibers to delay the analog signals. A distributed data acquisition system using GBit Ethernet and FiberChannel technology allows to read out the 100 kByte events with a continuous rate of up to 1 kHz.