• We present in detail the convolutional neural network used in our previous work to detect cosmic strings in cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy maps. By training this neural network on numerically generated CMB temperature maps, with and without cosmic strings, the network can produce prediction maps that locate the position of the cosmic strings and provide a probabilistic estimate of the value of the string tension $G\mu$. Supplying noiseless simulations of CMB maps with arcmin resolution to the network resulted in the accurate determination both of string locations and string tension for sky maps having strings with string tension as low as $G\mu=5\times10^{-9}$. The code is publicly available online. Though we trained the network with a long straight string toy model, we show the network performs well with realistic Nambu-Goto simulations.
  • There exists various proposals to detect cosmic strings from Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) or 21 cm temperature maps. Current proposals do not aim to find the location of strings on sky maps, all of these approaches can be thought of as a statistic on a sky map. We propose a Bayesian interpretation of cosmic string detection and within that framework, we derive a connection between estimates of cosmic string locations and cosmic string tension $G\mu$. We use this Bayesian framework to develop a machine learning framework for detecting strings from sky maps and outline how to implement this framework with neural networks. The neural network we trained was able to detect and locate cosmic strings on noiseless CMB temperature map down to a string tension of $G\mu=5 \times10^{-9}$ and when analyzing a CMB temperature map that does not contain strings, the neural network gives a 0.95 probability that $G\mu\leq2.3\times10^{-9}$.