• We present integral field spectroscopy of galaxy cluster Abell 3827, using ALMA and VLT/MUSE. It reveals an unusual configuration of strong gravitational lensing in the cluster core, with at least seven lensed images of a single background spiral galaxy. Lens modelling based on HST imaging had suggested that the dark matter associated with one of the cluster's central galaxies may be offset. The new spectroscopic data enable better subtraction of foreground light, and better identification of multiple background images. The inferred distribution of dark matter is consistent with being centered on the galaxies, as expected by LCDM. Each galaxy's dark matter also appears to be symmetric. Whilst we do not find an offset between mass and light (suggestive of self-interacting dark matter) as previously reported, the numerical simulations that have been performed to calibrate Abell 3827 indicate that offsets and asymmetry are still worth looking for in collisions with particular geometries. Meanwhile, ALMA proves exceptionally useful for strong lens image identifications.
  • Simulations of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) predict that dark matter should lag behind galaxies during a collision. If the interaction is mediated by a high-mass force carrier, the distribution of dark matter can also develop asymmetric dark matter tails. To search for this asymmetry, we compute the gravitational lensing properties of a mass distribution with a free {\em skewness} parameter. We apply this to the dark matter around the four central galaxies in cluster Abell~3827. In the galaxy whose dark matter peak has previously been found to be offset, we tentatively measure a skewness $s=0.23^{+0.05}_{-0.22}$ in the same direction as the peak offset. Our method may be useful in future gravitational lensing analyses of colliding galaxy clusters and merging galaxies.
  • We present IFS-RedEx, a spectrum and redshift extraction pipeline for integral-field spectrographs. A key feature of the tool is a wavelet-based spectrum cleaner. It identifies reliable spectral features, reconstructs their shapes, and suppresses the spectrum noise. This gives the technique an advantage over conventional methods like Gaussian filtering, which only smears out the signal. As a result, the wavelet-based cleaning allows the quick identification of true spectral features. We test the cleaning technique with degraded MUSE spectra and find that it can detect spectrum peaks down to S/N = 8 while reporting no fake detections. We apply IFS-RedEx to MUSE data of the strong lensing cluster MACSJ1931.8-2635 and extract 54 spectroscopic redshifts. We identify 29 cluster members and 22 background galaxies with z >= 0.4. IFS-RedEx is open source and publicly available.