• Device-independent security is the gold standard for quantum cryptography: not only is security based entirely on the laws of quantum mechanics, but it holds irrespective of any a priori assumptions on the quantum devices used in a protocol, making it particularly applicable in a quantum-wary environment. While the existence of device-independent protocols for tasks such as randomness expansion and quantum key distribution has recently been established, the underlying proofs of security remain very challenging, yield rather poor key rates, and demand very high-quality quantum devices, thus making them all but impossible to implement in practice. We introduce a technique for the analysis of device-independent cryptographic protocols. We provide a flexible protocol and give a security proof that provides quantitative bounds that are asymptotically tight, even in the presence of general quantum adversaries. At a high level our approach amounts to establishing a reduction to the scenario in which the untrusted device operates in an identical and independent way in each round of the protocol. This is achieved by leveraging the sequential nature of the protocol, and makes use of a newly developed tool, the "entropy accumulation theorem" of Dupuis et al. As concrete applications we give simple and modular security proofs for device-independent quantum key distribution and randomness expansion protocols based on the CHSH inequality. For both tasks we establish essentially optimal asymptotic key rates and noise tolerance. In view of recent experimental progress, which has culminated in loophole-free Bell tests, it is likely that these protocols can be practically implemented in the near future.
  • Quantum theory provides an extremely accurate description of fundamental processes in physics. It thus seems likely that the theory is applicable beyond the, mostly microscopic, domain in which it has been tested experimentally. Here we propose a Gedankenexperiment to investigate the question whether quantum theory can, in principle, have universal validity. The idea is that, if the answer was yes, it must be possible to employ quantum theory to model complex systems that include agents who are themselves using quantum theory. Analysing the experiment under this presumption, we find that one agent, upon observing a particular measurement outcome, must conclude that another agent has predicted the opposite outcome with certainty. The agents' conclusions, although all derived within quantum theory, are thus inconsistent. This indicates that quantum theory cannot be extrapolated to complex systems, at least not in a straightforward manner.
  • We propose the concept of a system algebra with a parallel composition operation and an interface connection operation, and formalize composition-order invariance, which postulates that the order of composing and connecting systems is irrelevant, a generalized form of associativity. Composition-order invariance explicitly captures a common property that is implicit in any context where one can draw a figure (hiding the drawing order) of several connected systems, which appears in many scientific contexts. This abstract algebra captures settings where one is interested in the behavior of a composed system in an environment and wants to abstract away anything internal not relevant for the behavior. This may include physical systems, electronic circuits, or interacting distributed systems. One specific such setting, of special interest in computer science, are functional system algebras, which capture, in the most general sense, any type of system that takes inputs and produces outputs depending on the inputs, and where the output of a system can be the input to another system. The behavior of such a system is uniquely determined by the function mapping inputs to outputs. We consider several instantiations of this very general concept. In particular, we show that Kahn networks form a functional system algebra and prove their composition-order invariance. Moreover, we define a functional system algebra of causal systems, characterized by the property that inputs can only influence future outputs, where an abstract partial order relation captures the notion of "later". This system algebra is also shown to be composition-order invariant and appropriate instantiations thereof allow to model and analyze systems that depend on time.
  • A tripartite state $\rho_{ABC}$ forms a Markov chain if there exists a recovery map $\mathcal{R}_{B \to BC}$ acting only on the $B$-part that perfectly reconstructs $\rho_{ABC}$ from $\rho_{AB}$. To achieve an approximate reconstruction, it suffices that the conditional mutual information $I(A:C|B)_{\rho}$ is small, as shown recently. Here we ask what conditions are necessary for approximate state reconstruction. This is answered by a lower bound on the relative entropy between $\rho_{ABC}$ and the recovered state $\mathcal{R}_{B\to BC}(\rho_{AB})$. The bound consists of the conditional mutual information and an entropic correction term that quantifies the disturbance of the $B$-part by the recovery map.
  • The data processing inequality states that the quantum relative entropy between two states $\rho$ and $\sigma$ can never increase by applying the same quantum channel $\mathcal{N}$ to both states. This inequality can be strengthened with a remainder term in the form of a distance between $\rho$ and the closest recovered state $(\mathcal{R} \circ \mathcal{N})(\rho)$, where $\mathcal{R}$ is a recovery map with the property that $\sigma = (\mathcal{R} \circ \mathcal{N})(\sigma)$. We show the existence of an explicit recovery map that is universal in the sense that it depends only on $\sigma$ and the quantum channel $\mathcal{N}$ to be reversed. This result gives an alternate, information-theoretic characterization of the conditions for approximate quantum error correction.
  • Information-theoretic approaches provide a promising avenue for extending the laws of thermodynamics to the nanoscale. Here, we provide a general fundamental lower limit, valid for systems with an arbitrary Hamiltonian and in contact with any thermodynamic bath, on the work cost for the implementation of any logical process. This limit is given by a new information measure---the coherent relative entropy---which accounts for the Gibbs weight of each microstate. The coherent relative entropy enjoys a collection of natural properties justifying its interpretation as a measure of information, and can be understood as a generalization of a quantum relative entropy difference. As an application, we show that the standard first and second laws of thermodynamics emerge from our microscopic picture in the macroscopic limit. Finally, our results have an impact on understanding the role of the observer in thermodynamics: Our approach may be applied at any level of knowledge---for instance at the microscopic, mesoscopic or macroscopic scales---thus providing a formulation of thermodynamics that is inherently relative to the observer. We obtain a precise criterion for when the laws of thermodynamics can be applied, thus making a step forward in determining the exact extent of the universality of thermodynamics and enabling a systematic treatment of Maxwell-demon-like situations.
  • We reconsider the basic building blocks of classical phenomenological thermodynamics. While doing so we show that the zeroth law is a redundant postulate for the theory by deriving it from the first and the second laws. This is in stark contrast to the prevalent conception that the three laws, the zeroth, first and second, are all necessary and independent axioms.
  • Optimal (reversible) processes in thermodynamics can be modelled as step-by-step processes, where the system is successively thermalized with respect to different Hamiltonians due to interactions with different parts of a thermal bath (see e.g. Skrzypczyk et al, Nat. Commun. 5, 4185 (2014)). However, in practice precise control of the interaction between system and thermal bath is usually out of reach. Motivated by this observation, we consider noisy and uncontrolled operations between system and bath, which result in thermalizations that are only partial in each step. Our main result is that optimal processes can still be achieved for any non-trivial partial thermalizations, at the price of increasing the number of operations. Focusing on work extraction protocols, we quantify the errors for qubit systems and a finite number of operations, providing corrections to Landauer's principle in the presence of partial thermalizations. Our results show that optimal processes are robust to noise and imperfections in small quantum systems, and can be achieved by a large set of interactions between system and bath.
  • Quantum teleportation uses prior shared entanglement and classical communication to send an unknown quantum state from one party to another. Remote state preparation (RSP) is a similar distributed task in which the sender knows the entire classical description of the state to be sent. (This may also be viewed as the task of non-oblivious compression of a single sample from an ensemble of quantum states.) We study the communication complexity of approximate remote state preparation, in which the goal is to prepare an approximation of the desired quantum state. Jain [Quant. Inf. & Comp., 2006] showed that the worst-case communication complexity of approximate RSP can be bounded from above in terms of the maximum possible information in an encoding. He also showed that this quantity is a lower bound for communication complexity of (exact) remote state preparation. In this work, we tightly characterize the worst-case and average-case communication complexity of remote state preparation in terms of non-asymptotic information-theoretic quantities. We also show that the average-case communication complexity of RSP can be much smaller than the worst-case one. In the process, we show that n bits cannot be communicated with less than n transmitted bits in LOCC protocols. This strengthens a result due to Nayak and Salzman [J. ACM, 2006] and may be of independent interest.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • We address the question of whether the quantum-mechanical wave function $\Psi$ of a system is uniquely determined by any complete description $\Lambda$ of the system's physical state. We show that this is the case if the latter satisfies a notion of "free choice". This notion requires that certain experimental parameters---those that according to quantum theory can be chosen independently of other variables---retain this property in the presence of $\Lambda$. An implication of this result is that, among all possible descriptions $\Lambda$ of a system's state compatible with free choice, the wave function $\Psi$ is as objective as $\Lambda$.
  • Degradable quantum channels are an important class of completely positive trace-preserving maps. Among other properties, they offer a single-letter formula for the quantum and the private classical capacity and are characterized by the fact that a complementary channel can be obtained from the channel by applying a degrading channel. In this work we introduce the concept of approximate degradable channels, which satisfy this condition up to some finite $\varepsilon\geq0$. That is, there exists a degrading channel which upon composition with the channel is $\varepsilon$-close in the diamond norm to the complementary channel. We show that for any fixed channel the smallest such $\varepsilon$ can be efficiently determined via a semidefinite program. Moreover, these approximate degradable channels also approximately inherit all other properties of degradable channels. As an application, we derive improved upper bounds to the quantum and private classical capacity for certain channels of interest in quantum communication.
  • The Born rule assigns a probability to any possible outcome of a quantum measurement, but leaves open the question how these probabilities are to be interpreted and, in particular, how they relate to the outcome observed in an actual experiment. We propose to avoid this question by replacing the Born rule with two non-probabilistic postulates: (i) the projector associated to the observed outcome must have a positive overlap with the state of the measured system; (ii) statements about observed outcomes are robust, that is, remain valid under small perturbations of the state. We show that the two postulates suffice to retrieve the interpretations of the Born rule that are commonly used for analysing experimental data.
  • Complex information-processing systems, for example quantum circuits, cryptographic protocols, or multi-player games, are naturally described as networks composed of more basic information-processing systems. A modular analysis of such systems requires a mathematical model of systems that is closed under composition, i.e., a network of these objects is again an object of the same type. We propose such a model and call the corresponding systems causal boxes. Causal boxes capture superpositions of causal structures, e.g., messages sent by a causal box A can be in a superposition of different orders or in a superposition of being sent to box B and box C. Furthermore, causal boxes can model systems whose behavior depends on time. By instantiating the Abstract Cryptography framework with causal boxes, we obtain the first composable security framework that can handle arbitrary quantum protocols and relativistic protocols.
  • Thermodynamic entropy, as defined by Clausius, characterizes macroscopic observations of a system based on phenomenological quantities such as temperature and heat. In contrast, information-theoretic entropy, introduced by Shannon, is a measure of uncertainty. In this Letter, we connect these two notions of entropy, using an axiomatic framework for thermodynamics [Lieb, Yngvason, Proc. Roy. Soc.(2013)]. In particular, we obtain a direct relation between the Clausius entropy and the Shannon entropy, or its generalisation to quantum systems, the von Neumann entropy. More generally, we find that entropy measures relevant in non-equilibrium thermodynamics correspond to entropies used in one-shot information theory.
  • We ask the question whether entropy accumulates, in the sense that the operationally relevant total uncertainty about an $n$-partite system $A = (A_1, \ldots A_n)$ corresponds to the sum of the entropies of its parts $A_i$. The Asymptotic Equipartition Property implies that this is indeed the case to first order in $n$, under the assumption that the parts $A_i$ are identical and independent of each other. Here we show that entropy accumulation occurs more generally, i.e., without an independence assumption, provided one quantifies the uncertainty about the individual systems $A_i$ by the von Neumann entropy of suitably chosen conditional states. The analysis of a large system can hence be reduced to the study of its parts. This is relevant for applications. In device-independent cryptography, for instance, the approach yields essentially optimal security bounds valid for general attacks, as shown by Arnon-Friedman et al.
  • Precise characterization of quantum devices is usually achieved with quantum tomography. However, most methods which are currently widely used in experiments, such as maximum likelihood estimation, lack a well-justified error analysis. Promising recent methods based on confidence regions are difficult to apply in practice or yield error bars which are unnecessarily large. Here, we propose a practical yet robust method for obtaining error bars. We do so by introducing a novel representation of the output of the tomography procedure, the "quantum error bars". This representation is (i) concise, being given in terms of few parameters, (ii) intuitive, providing a fair idea of the "spread" of the error, and (iii) useful, containing the necessary information for constructing confidence regions. The statements resulting from our method are formulated in terms of a figure of merit, such as the fidelity to a reference state. We present an algorithm for computing this representation and provide ready-to-use software. Our procedure is applied to actual experimental data obtained from two superconducting qubits in an entangled state, demonstrating the applicability of our method.
  • The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence of an uncorrelated ancilla system. This removes a restriction on the standard notion of decoupling, which becomes important for structureless resources, and yields a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. Catalytic decoupling naturally unifies various tasks like the erasure of correlations and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling.
  • We construct an explicit quantum coding scheme which achieves a communication rate not less than the coherent information when used to transmit quantum information over a noisy quantum channel. For Pauli and erasure channels we also present efficient encoding and decoding algorithms for this communication scheme based on polar codes (essentially linear in the blocklength), but which do not require the sender and receiver to share any entanglement before the protocol begins. Due to the existence of degeneracies in the involved error-correcting codes it is indeed possible that the rate of the scheme exceeds the coherent information. We provide a simple criterion which indicates such performance. Finally we discuss how the scheme can be used for secret key distillation as well as private channel coding.
  • How far can we take the resource theoretic approach to explore physics? Resource theories like LOCC, reference frames and quantum thermodynamics have proven a powerful tool to study how agents who are subject to certain constraints can act on physical systems. This approach has advanced our understanding of fundamental physical principles, such as the second law of thermodynamics, and provided operational measures to quantify resources such as entanglement or information content. In this work, we significantly extend the approach and range of applicability of resource theories. Firstly we generalize the notion of resource theories to include any description or knowledge that agents may have of a physical state, beyond the density operator formalism. We show how to relate theories that differ in the language used to describe resources, like micro and macroscopic thermodynamics. Finally, we take a top-down approach to locality, in which a subsystem structure is derived from a global theory rather than assumed. The extended framework introduced here enables us to formalize new tasks in the language of resource theories, ranging from tomography, cryptography, thermodynamics and foundational questions, both within and beyond quantum theory.
  • We show that the conditional min-entropy Hmin(A|B) of a bipartite state rho_AB is directly related to the maximum achievable overlap with a maximally entangled state if only local actions on the B-part of rho_AB are allowed. In the special case where A is classical, this overlap corresponds to the probability of guessing A given B. In a similar vein, we connect the conditional max-entropy Hmax(A|B) to the maximum fidelity of rho_AB with a product state that is completely mixed on A. In the case where A is classical, this corresponds to the security of A when used as a secret key in the presence of an adversary holding B. Because min- and max-entropies are known to characterize information-processing tasks such as randomness extraction and state merging, our results establish a direct connection between these tasks and basic operational problems. For example, they imply that the (logarithm of the) probability of guessing A given B is a lower bound on the number of uniform secret bits that can be extracted from A relative to an adversary holding B.
  • A central question in quantum information theory is to determine how well lost information can be reconstructed. Crucially, the corresponding recovery operation should perform well without knowing the information to be reconstructed. In this work, we show that the quantum conditional mutual information measures the performance of such recovery operations. More precisely, we prove that the conditional mutual information $I(A:C|B)$ of a tripartite quantum state $\rho_{ABC}$ can be bounded from below by its distance to the closest recovered state $\mathcal{R}_{B \to BC}(\rho_{AB})$, where the $C$-part is reconstructed from the $B$-part only and the recovery map $\mathcal{R}_{B \to BC}$ merely depends on $\rho_{BC}$. One particular application of this result implies the equivalence between two different approaches to define topological order in quantum systems.
  • The use of the von Neumann entropy in formulating the laws of thermodynamics has recently been challenged. It is associated with the average work whereas the work guaranteed to be extracted in any single run of an experiment is the more interesting quantity in general. We show that an expression that quantifies majorisation determines the optimal guaranteed work. We argue it should therefore be the central quantity of statistical mechanics, rather than the von Neumann entropy. In the limit of many identical and independent subsystems (asymptotic i.i.d) the von Neumann entropy expressions are recovered but in the non-equilbrium regime the optimal guaranteed work can be radically different to the optimal average. Moreover our measure of majorisation governs which evolutions can be realized via thermal interactions, whereas the nondecrease of the von Neumann entropy is not sufficiently restrictive. Our results are inspired by single-shot information theory.
  • Irreversible information processing cannot be carried out without some inevitable thermodynamical work cost. This fundamental restriction, known as Landauer's principle, is increasingly relevant today, as the energy dissipation of computing devices impedes the development of their performance. Here we determine the minimal work required to carry out any logical process, for instance a computation. It is given by the entropy of the discarded information conditional to the output of the computation. Our formula takes precisely into account the statistically fluctuating work requirement of the logical process. It enables the explicit calculation of practical scenarios, such as computational circuits or quantum measurements. On the conceptual level, our result gives a precise and operationally justified connection between thermodynamic and information entropy, and explains the emergence of the entropy state function in macroscopic thermodynamics.
  • Time plays a crucial role in the intuitive understanding of the world around us. Within quantum mechanics, however, time is not usually treated as an observable quantity; it enters merely as a parameter in the laws of motion of physical systems. Here we take an operational approach to time. Towards this goal we consider quantum clocks, i.e., quantum systems that generate an observable time scale. We then study the quality of quantum clocks in terms of their ability to stay synchronised. To quantify this, we introduce the "Alternate Ticks Game" and analyse a few strategies pertinent to this game.