• The debris disk around $\beta$ Pictoris is known to contain gas. Previous ALMA observations revealed a CO belt at $\sim$85 au with a distinct clump, interpreted as a location of enhanced gas production. Photodissociation converts CO into C and O within $\sim$50 years. We resolve CI emission at 492 GHz using ALMA and study its spatial distribution. CI shows the same clump as seen for CO. This is surprising, as C is expected to quickly spread in azimuth. We derive a low C mass (between $4\times10^{-4}$ and $2.2\times10^{-3}$ M$_\oplus$), indicating that gas production started only recently (within $\sim$5000 years). No evidence is seen for an atomic accretion disk inwards of the CO belt, perhaps because the gas did not yet have time to spread radially. The fact that C and CO share the same asymmetry argues against a previously proposed scenario where the clump is due to an outward migrating planet trapping planetesimals in an resonance; nor can the observations be explained by an eccentric planetesimal belt secularly forced by a planet. Instead, we suggest that the dust and gas disks should be eccentric. Such a configuration, we further speculate, might be produced by a recent tidal disruption event. Assuming that the disrupted body has had a CO mass fraction of 10%, its total mass would be $\sim$3 $M_\mathrm{Moon}$.
  • We investigate to what degree local physical and chemical conditions are related to the evolutionary status of various objects in star-forming media. rho Oph A displays the entire sequence of low-mass star formation in a small volume of space. Using spectrophotometric line maps of H2, H2O, NH3, N2H+, O2, OI, CO, and CS, we examine the distribution of the atomic and molecular gas in this dense molecular core. The physical parameters of these species are derived, as are their relative abundances in rho Oph A. Using radiative transfer models, we examine the infall status of the cold dense cores from their resolved line profiles of the ground state lines of H2O and NH3, where for the latter no contamination from the VLA 1623 outflow is observed and line overlap of the hyperfine components is explicitly taken into account. The stratified structure of this photon dominated region (PDR), seen edge-on, is clearly displayed. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and OI are seen throughout the region around the exciting star S1. At the interface to the molecular core 0.05 pc away, atomic hydrogen is rapidly converted into H2, whereas OI protrudes further into the molecular core. This provides oxygen atoms for the gas-phase formation of O2 in the core SM1, where X(O2)~ 5.e-8. There, the ratio of the O2 to H2O abundance [X(H2O)~ 5.e-9] is significantly higher than unity. Away from the core, O2 experiences a dramatic decrease due to increasing H2O formation. Outside the molecular core, on the far side as seen from S1, the intense radiation from the 0.5 pc distant early B-type star HD147889 destroys the molecules. Towards the dark core SM1, the observed abundance ratio X(O2)/X(H2O)>1, which suggests that this object is extremely young, which would explain why O2 is such an elusive molecule outside the solar system.
  • We are addressing the sites of isolated low mass star formation in the solar neighbourhood, i.e. small cloud cores within one kiloparsec. We aim at determining the physical parameters of the cores, i.e., temperature, volume density, column density and (radial) velocity fields, and the status of star formation, i.e., whether embedded objects are present within the cores. Surveying small dark clouds in both celestial hemispheres we study the physical conditions of low-mass star formation for detectable core masses M>0.01Msun. The target list is drawn from catalogues of optically selected dark cloud cores, where the visual extinction exceeds 5 magnitudes. The selected probe is the CS molecule that needs high densities for excitation of its rotational levels. To gauge the state of excitation, the cores were observed in two transitions. In a limited number of cases, optical depths were derived from complementing lines of the rarer isotopologue C34S for the (2-1) and (3-2) transitions. Making small (3arcmin by 3arcmin) maps, the 471 optically selected cores were searched for CS(2-1) and 315 (67%) were detected (T_A*>3sigma). In general, the position of peak CS emission does not coincide with the optically determined centre of the cores. The cores appear cold (T<10K) and, in the majority of cases, the CS emission is optically thin (tau<1). On the arcminute scales of the observations, the median column density of carbon monosulfide is N(CS)=7.E12/cm2. For an average abundance of N(CS)/N(H2)=1.E-8, the median mass of the detected cores is 1.0Msun. The line shapes are most often Gaussian with widths exceeding that due to thermal broadening of <0.1km/s. The observed median FWHM=0.7km/s, i.e. non-thermal turbulence contributes dominantly to the line widths
  • For the last few decades the study of disks around stars young and old and of different types have progressed significantly. During the same time a completely new discipline, the study of exoplanets, planets orbiting stars other than our Sun, have emerged. Both these fields, which are interconnected, have benefited from the development of new instrumentation, and especially by telescopes and detectors deployed in space. In this chapter we are describing the state of the art of such instruments and make an inventory of what is being currently developed. We also state some of the requirements of the next steps and what type of instruments will lead the way forward.
  • Context: The abundance of key molecules determines the level of cooling that is necessary for the formation of stars and planetary systems. In this context, one needs to understand the details of the time dependent oxygen chemistry, leading to the formation of molecular oxygen and water. Aims: We aim to determine the degree of correlation between the occurrence of O2 and HOOH (hydrogen peroxide) in star-forming molecular clouds. We first detected O2 and HOOH in the rho Ophiuchi cloud (core A), we now search for HOOH in Orion Molecular Cloud OMC A, where O2 has also been detected. Methods: We mapped a 3 arcmin times 3 arcmin region around Orion H2-Peak 1 with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). In addition to several maps in two transitions of HOOH, viz. 219.17 GHz and 251.91 GHz, we obtained single-point spectra for another three transitions towards the position of maximum emission. Results: Line emission at the appropriate LSR-velocity (Local Standard of Rest) and at the level of greater or equal to 4 sigma was found for two transitions, with lower S/N (2.8 - 3.5 sigma) for another two transitions, whereas for the remaining transition, only an upper limit was obtained. The emitting region, offset 18 arcsec south of H2-Peak 1, appeared point-like in our observations with APEX. Conclusions: The extremely high spectral line density in Orion makes the identification of HOOH much more difficult than in rho Oph A. As a result of having to consider the possible contamination by other molecules, we left the current detection status undecided.
  • According to traditional gas-phase chemical models, O2 should be abundant in molecular clouds, but until recently, attempts to detect interstellar O2 line emission with ground- and space-based observatories have failed. Following the multi-line detections of O2 with low abundances in the Orion and rho Oph A molecular clouds with Herschel, it is important to investigate other environments, and we here quantify the O2 abundance near a solar-mass protostar. Observations of O2, at 487 GHz toward a deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 protostar, NGC 1333-IRAS 4A, are presented, using the HIFI instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory. Complementary data of the chemically related NO and CO molecules are obtained as well. The high spectral resolution data are analysed using radiative transfer models to infer column densities and abundances, and are tested directly against full gas-grain chemical models. The deep HIFI spectrum fails to show O2 at the velocity of the dense protostellar envelope, implying one of the lowest abundance upper limits of O2/H2 at <6x10^-9 (3 sigma). However, a tentative (4.5 sigma) detection of O2 is seen at the velocity of the surrounding NGC 1333 molecular cloud, shifted by 1 km/s relative to the protostar. For the protostellar envelope, pure gas-phase models and gas-grain chemical models require a long pre-collapse phase (~0.7-1x10^6 years), during which atomic and molecular oxygen are frozen out onto dust grains and fully converted to H2O, to avoid overproduction of O2 in the dense envelope. The same model also reproduces the limits on the chemically related NO molecule. The tentative detection of O2 in the surrounding cloud is consistent with a low-density PDR model with small changes in reaction rates. The low O2 abundance in the collapsing envelope around a low-mass protostar suggests that the gas and ice entering protoplanetary disks is very poor in O2.
  • We report the results of a search for molecular oxygen (O2) toward the Orion Bar, a prominent photodissociation region at the southern edge of the HII region created by the luminous Trapezium stars. We observed the spectral region around the frequency of the O2 N_J = 3_3 - 1_2 transition at 487 GHz and the 5_4 - 3_4 transition at 774 GHz using the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on the Herschel Space Observatory. Neither line was detected, but the 3sigma upper limits established here translate to a total line-of-sight O2 column density < 1.5 10^16 cm^-2 for an emitting region whose temperature is between 30K and 250 K, or < 1 10^16 cm^-2 if the O2 emitting region is primarily at a temperature of ~< 100 K. Because the Orion Bar is oriented nearly edge-on relative to our line of sight, the observed column density is enhanced by a factor estimated to be between 4 and 20 relative to the face-on value. Our upper limits imply that the face-on O2 column density is less than 4 10^15 cm^-2, a value that is below, and possibly well below, model predictions for gas with a density of 10^4 - 10^5 cm^-3 exposed to a far ultraviolet flux 10^4 times the local value, conditions inferred from previous observations of the Orion Bar. The discrepancy might be resolved if: (1) the adsorption energy of O atoms to ice is greater than 800 K; (2) the total face-on Av of the Bar is less than required for O2 to reach peak abundance; (3) the O2 emission arises within dense clumps with a small beam filling factor; or, (4) the face-on depth into the Bar where O2 reaches its peak abundance, which is density dependent, corresponds to a sky position different from that sampled by our Herschel beams.
  • (abridged) A complete census of planetary systems around a volume-limited sample of solar-type stars (FGK dwarfs) in the Solar neighborhood with uniform sensitivity down to Earth-mass planets within their Habitable Zones out to several AUs would be a major milestone in extrasolar planets astrophysics. This fundamental goal can be achieved with a mission concept such as NEAT - the Nearby Earth Astrometric Telescope. NEAT is designed to carry out space-borne extremely-high-precision astrometric measurements sufficient to detect dynamical effects due to orbiting planets of mass even lower than Earth's around the nearest stars. Such a survey mission would provide the actual planetary masses and the full orbital geometry for all the components of the detected planetary systems down to the Earth-mass limit. The NEAT performance limits can be achieved by carrying out differential astrometry between the targets and a set of suitable reference stars in the field. The NEAT instrument design consists of an off-axis parabola single-mirror telescope, a detector with a large field of view made of small movable CCDs located around a fixed central CCD, and an interferometric calibration system originating from metrology fibers located at the primary mirror. The proposed mission architecture relies on the use of two satellites operating at L2 for 5 years, flying in formation and offering a capability of more than 20,000 reconfigurations (alternative option uses deployable boom). The NEAT primary science program will encompass an astrometric survey of our 200 closest F-, G- and K-type stellar neighbors, with an average of 50 visits. The remaining time might be allocated to improve the characterization of the architecture of selected planetary systems around nearby targets of specific interest (low-mass stars, young stars, etc.) discovered by Gaia, ground-based high-precision radial-velocity surveys.
  • We report observations of three rotational transitions of molecular oxygen (O2) in emission from the H2 Peak 1 position of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in Orion. We observed the 487 GHz, 774 GHz, and 1121 GHz lines using HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, having velocities of 11 km s-1 to 12 km s-1 and widths of 3 km s-1. The beam-averaged column density is N(O2) = 6.5\times1016 cm-2, and assuming that the source has an equal beam filling factor for all transitions (beam widths 44, 28, and 19"), the relative line intensities imply a kinetic temperature between 65 K and 120 K. The fractional abundance of O2 relative to H2 is 0.3 - 7.3\times10-6. The unusual velocity suggests an association with a ~ 5" diameter source, denoted Peak A, the Western Clump, or MF4. The mass of this source is ~ 10 M\odot and the dust temperature is \geq 150 K. Our preferred explanation of the enhanced O2 abundance is that dust grains in this region are sufficiently warm (T \geq 100 K) to desorb water ice and thus keep a significant fraction of elemental oxygen in the gas phase, with a significant fraction as O2. For this small source, the line ratios require a temperature \geq 180 K. The inferred O2 column density \simeq 5\times1018 cm-2 can be produced in Peak A, having N(H2) \simeq 4\times1024 cm-2. An alternative mechanism is a low-velocity (10 to 15 km s-1) C-shock, which can produce N(O2) up to 1017 cm-2.
  • After Earth's origin, our host star, the Sun, was shining 20 to 25 percent less brightly than today. Without greenhouse-like conditions to warm the atmosphere, our early planet would have been an ice ball and life may never have evolved. But life did evolve, which indicates that greenhouse gases must have been present on early Earth to warm the planet. Evidence from the geologic record indicates an abundance of the greenhouse gas CO2. CH4 was probably present as well, and in this regard methanogenic bacteria, which belong to a diverse group of anaerobic procaryotes that ferment CO 2 plus H2 to CH4, may have contributed to modification of the early atmosphere. Molecular oxygen was not present, as is indicated by the study of rocks from that era, which contain iron carbonate rather than iron oxide. Multicellular organisms originated as cells within colonies that became increasingly specialized. The development of photosynthesis allowed the Sun's energy to be harvested directly by life forms. The resultant oxygen accumulated in the atmosphere and formed the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere. Aided by the absorption of harmful UV radiation in the ozone layer, life colonized Earth's surface. Our own planet is a very good example of how life forms modified the atmosphere over the planets' life time. We show that these facts have to be taken into account when we discover and characterize atmospheres of Earth-like exoplanets. If life has originated and evolved on a planet, then it should be expected that a strong co-evolution occurred between life and the atmosphere, the result of which is the planets' climate.
  • In this outlook we describe what could be the next steps of the direct characterization of habitable exoplanets after first the medium and large mission projects and investigate the benefits of the spectroscopic and direct imaging approaches. We show that after third and fourth generation missions foreseeable for the next 100 years, we will face a very long era before being able to see directly the morphology of extrasolar organisms.
  • Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the universe, but its chemistry in the interstellar medium is still not well understood. In order to critically examine the entire oxygen budget, we attempt here initially to estimate the abundance of atomic oxygen, O, in the only one region, where molecular oxygen, O2, has been detected to date. We analyse ISOCAM-CVF spectral image data toward rho Oph A to derive the temperatures and column densities of H2 at the locations of ISO-LWS observations of two [OI] 3P_J lines. The intensity ratios of the (J=1-2) 63um to (J=0-1) 145um lines largely exceed ten, attesting to the fact that these lines are optically thin. This is confirmed by radiative transfer calculations, making these lines suitable for abundance determinations. For that purpose, we calculate line strengths and compare them to the LWS observations. Excess [OI] emission is observed to be associated with the molecular outflow from VLA 1623. For this region, we determine the physical parameters, T and N(H2), from the CAM observations and the gas density, n(H2), is determined from the flux ratio of the [O I]63um and [O I]145um lines. For the oxygen abundance, our analysis leads to essentially three possibilities: (1) Extended low density gas with standard ISM O-abundance, (2) Compact high density gas with standard ISM O-abundance and (3) Extended high density gas with reduced oxygen abundance, [O/H] ~ 2E-5. As option (1) disregards valid [O I] 145um data, we do not find it very compelling; we favour option (3), as lower abundances are expected as a result of chemical cloud evolution, but we are not able to dismiss option (2) entirely. Observations at higher angular resolution than offered by the LWS are required to decide between these possibilities.
  • We report observations of gaseous methanol in an edge-on torus surrounding the young stellar object L1551 IRS5. The peaks in the torus are separated by ~ 10,000 AU from L1551 IRS5, and contain ~ 0.03 earth masses of cold methanol. We infer that the methanol abundance increases in the outer part of the torus, probably as a result of methanol evaporation from dust grain surfaces heated by the shock luminosity associated with the shocks associated with the jets of an externally located x-ray source. Any methanol released in such a cold environment will rapidly freeze again, spreading methanol throughout the circumbinary torus to nascent dust grains, planitesimals, and primitive bodies. These observations probe the initial chemical conditions of matter infalling onto the disk.
  • We have used VLT/UVES to spatially resolve the gas disk of beta Pictoris. 88 extended emission lines are observed, with the brightest coming from Fe I, Na I and Ca II. The extent of the gas disk is much larger than previously anticipated; we trace Na I radially from 13 AU out to 323 AU and Ca II to heights of 77 AU above the disk plane, both to the limits of our observations. The degree of flaring is significantly larger for the gas disk than the dust disk. A strong NE/SW brightness asymmetry is observed, with the SW emission being abruptly truncated at 150-200 AU. The inner gas disk is tilted about 5 degrees with respect to the outer disk, similar to the appearance of the disk in light scattered from dust. We show that most, perhaps all, of the Na I column density seen in the 'stable' component of absorption, comes from the extended disk. Finally, we discuss the effects of radiation pressure in the extended gas disk and show that the assumption of hydrogen, in whatever form, as a braking agent is inconsistent with observations.
  • We present high resolution Na I D spectroscopy of the beta Pic disk, and the resonantly scattered sodium emission can be traced from less than 30 AU to at least 140 AU from the central star. This atomic gas is co-existent with the dust particles, suggestive of a common origin or source. The disk rotates towards us in the south-west and away from us in the north-east. The velocity pattern of the gas finally provides direct evidence that the faint linear feature seen in images of the star is a circumstellar disk in Keplerian rotation. From modelling the spatial distribution of the Na I line profiles we determine the effective dynamical mass to be 1.40 +/- 0.05 M_sun, which is smaller than the stellar mass, 1.75 M_sun. We ascribe this difference to the gravity opposing radiation pressure in the Na I lines. We argue that this is consistent with the fact that Na is nearly completely ionised throughout the disk (Na I/Na < 10^-4). The total column density of sodium gas is N(Na) = 10^15 cm^-2.
  • Since a majority of young low-mass stars are members of multiple systems, the study of their stellar and disk configurations is crucial to our understanding of both star and planet formation processes. Here we present near-infrared adaptive optics observations of the young multiple star system VW Cha. The previously known 0.7 arcsec binary is clearly resolved already in our raw J and K band images. We report the discovery of a new, faint companion to the secondary, at an apparent separation of only 0.1 arcsec or 16 AU. Our high-resolution photometric observations also make it possible to measure the J-K colors of each of the three components individually. We detect an infrared excess in the primary, consistent with theoretical models of a circumprimary disk. Analytical and numerical calculations of orbital stability show that VW Cha may be a stable triple system. Using models for the age and total mass of the secondary pair, we estimate the orbital period to be 74 years. Thus, follow-up astrometric observations might yield direct dynamical masses within a few years, and constrain evolutionary models of low-mass stars. Our results demonstrate that adaptive optics imaging in conjunction with deconvolution techniques is a powerful tool for probing close multiple systems.