• Context: Anticyclonic vortices are considered as a favourable places for trapping dust and forming planetary embryos. On the other hand, they are massive blobs that can interact gravitationally with the planets in the disc. Aims: We aim to study how a vortex interacts gravitationally with a planet which migrates toward it or a planet which is created inside the vortex. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a viscous locally isothermal disc using GFARGO and FARGO-ADSG. We set a stationary Gaussian pressure bump in the disc in a way that RWI is triggered. After a large vortex is established, we implanted a low mass planet in the outer disc or inside the vortex and allowed it to migrate. We also examined the effect of vortex strength on the planet migration and checked the validity of the final result in the presence of self-gravity. Results: We noticed regardless of the planet's initial position, the planet is finally locked to the vortex or its migration is stopped in a farther orbital distance in case of a stronger vortex. For the model with the weaker vortex, we studied the effect of different parameters such as background viscosity, background surface density, mass of the planet and different planet positions. In these models, while the trapping time and locking angle of the planet vary for different parameters, the main result, which is the planet-vortex locking, remains valid. We discovered that even a planet with a mass less than 5 * 10^{-7} M_{\star} comes out from the vortex and is locked to it at the same orbital distance. For a stronger vortex, both in non-self-gravitated and self-gravitating models, the planet migration is stopped far away from the radial position of the vortex. This effect can make the vortices a suitable place for continual planet formation under the condition that they save their shape during the planetary growth.
  • Dissipationless N-body models of rotating galaxies, iso-energetic to a non-rotating model, are examined as regards the mass in regular and in chaotic motion. The values of their spin parameters $\lambda$ are near the value $\lambda=0.22$ of our Galaxy. We obtain the distinction between the sets of particles moving in regular and in chaotic orbits and we show that the spatial distribution of these two sets of particles is much different. The rotating models are characterized by larger fractions of mass in chaotic motion ($\thickapprox 65%$) compared with the fraction of mass in chaotic motion in the non-rotating iso-energetic model ($\thickapprox 32%$). Furthermore, the Lyapunov numbers of the chaotic orbits in the rotating models become by about one order of magnitude larger than in the non-rotating model. Chaotic orbits are concentrated preferably in values of the Jacobi integral around the value of the effective potential at the corotation radius. We find that density waves form a central rotating bar embedded in a thin and a thick disc with exponential surface density profile. A surprising new result is that long living spiral arms are exited on the disc, composed almost completely by chaotic orbits. The bar excites an $m=2$ mode of spiral waves on the surface density of the disc, emanating from the corotation radius. These spiral waves are deformed, fade, or disappear temporarily, but they grow again re-forming a well developed spiral pattern. Spiral arms are discernible up to 20 or 30 rotations of the bar (lasting for about a Hubble time).