• There is increasing interest in learning how human brain networks vary as a function of a continuous trait, but flexible and efficient procedures to accomplish this goal are limited. We develop a Bayesian semiparametric model, which combines low-rank factorizations and flexible Gaussian process priors to learn changes in the conditional expectation of a network-valued random variable across the values of a continuous predictor, while including subject-specific random effects. The formulation leads to a general framework for inference on changes in brain network structures across human traits, facilitating borrowing of information and coherently characterizing uncertainty. We provide an efficient Gibbs sampler for posterior computation along with simple procedures for inference, prediction and goodness-of-fit assessments. The model is applied to learn how human brain networks vary across individuals with different intelligence scores. Results provide interesting insights on the association between intelligence and brain connectivity, while demonstrating good predictive performance.
  • Currently, connectomes (e.g., functional or structural brain graphs) can be estimated in humans at $\approx 1~mm^3$ scale using a combination of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. This manuscript summarizes a novel, scalable implementation of open-source algorithms to rapidly estimate magnetic resonance connectomes, using both anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) and voxel-size vertices. To assess the reliability of our pipeline, we develop a novel nonparametric non-Euclidean reliability metric. Here we provide an overview of the methods used, demonstrate our implementation, and discuss available user extensions. We conclude with results showing the efficacy and reliability of the pipeline over previous state-of-the-art.