• We analyze the stellar populations and evolutionary history of bulge-dominated field galaxies at redshifts 0.3<z<1.2 as part of the Gemini/HST Galaxy Cluster Project (GCP). High signal-to-noise optical spectroscopy from the Gemini Observatory and imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope are used to analyze a total of 43 galaxies, focusing on the 30 passive galaxies in the sample. Using the size-mass and velocity dispersion-mass relations for the passive field galaxies we find no significant evolution of sizes or velocity dispersions at a given dynamical mass between z~1 and the present. We establish the Fundamental Plane and study mass-to-light (M/L) ratios. The M/L vs. dynamical mass relation shows that the passive field galaxies follow a relation with a steeper slope than the local comparison sample, consistent with cluster galaxies in the GCP at z=0.86. This steeper slope indicates that the formation redshift is mass dependent, in agreement with "downsizing," meaning that the low mass galaxies formed their stars more recently while the high mass galaxies formed their stars at higher redshift. The zero point differences of the scaling relations for the M/L ratios imply a formation redshift of z_form=1.35(+0.10)(-0.07) for the passive field galaxies. This is consistent with the (Hdelta_A + Hgamma_A)' line index which implies a formation redshift of z_form=1.40(+0.60)(-0.18).
  • The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will enable revolutionary studies of galaxies, dark matter, and black holes over cosmic time. The LSST Galaxies Science Collaboration has identified a host of preparatory research tasks required to leverage fully the LSST dataset for extragalactic science beyond the study of dark energy. This Galaxies Science Roadmap provides a brief introduction to critical extragalactic science to be conducted ahead of LSST operations, and a detailed list of preparatory science tasks including the motivation, activities, and deliverables associated with each. The Galaxies Science Roadmap will serve as a guiding document for researchers interested in conducting extragalactic science in anticipation of the forthcoming LSST era.
  • We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at $1<z<1.5$, selected to span a factor $>10$ in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over $\lambda\sim 0.6$--$1.05\mu$m, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes $z^{\prime}<24.25$ and [3.6]$\mu$m$<22.5$, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses $M_\ast\gtrsim10^{10.3}M_\odot$, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning $u$ through $K$, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6$\mu$m. The spectroscopy is $\sim 50$ per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of $\sim 500$ new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.
  • Studies of cluster galaxies are increasingly finding galaxies with spectacular one-sided tails of gas and young stars, suggestive of intense ram-pressure stripping. These so-called "jellyfish" galaxies typically have late-type morphology. In this paper, we present MUSE observations of an elliptical galaxy in Abell 2670 with long tails of material visible in the optical spectra, as well as blobs with tadpole-like morphology. The spectra in the central part of the galaxy reveals a stellar component as well as ionized gas. The stellar component does not have significant rotation, while the ionized gas defines a clear star-forming gas disk. We argue, based on deep optical images of the galaxy, that the gas was most likely acquired during a past wet merger. It is possible that the star-forming blobs are also remnants of the merger. In addition, the direction and kinematics of the one-sided ionized tails, combined with the tadpole morphology of the star-forming blobs, strongly suggests that the system is undergoing ram pressure from the intracluster medium. In summary, this paper presents the discovery of a post-merger elliptical galaxy undergoing ram pressure stripping.
  • We analyse the evolution of environmental quenching efficiency, the fraction of quenched cluster galaxies that would be star-forming if they were in the field, as a function of redshift in 14 spectroscopically confirmed galaxy clusters with 0.87 < z < 1.63 from the Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS). The clusters are the richest in the survey at each redshift. Passive fractions rise from $42_{-13}^{+10}$\% at z ~ 1.6 to $80_{-9}^{+12}$\% at z ~ 1.3 and $88_{-3}^{+4}$\% at z < 1.1, outpacing the change in passive fraction in the field. Environmental quenching efficiency rises dramatically from $16_{-19}^{+15}$ at z ~ 1.6 to $62_{-15}^{+21}\% at z ~ 1.3 and $73_{-7}^{+8}$\% at z $\lesssim$ 1.1. This work is the first to show direct observational evidence for a rapid increase in the strength of environmental quenching in galaxy clusters at z ~ 1.5, where simulations show cluster-mass halos undergo non-linear collapse and virialisation.
  • We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of passive and star-forming galaxies with a limiting mass of 10$^{10.1}$ M$_{\odot}$ in four spectroscopically confirmed Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) galaxy clusters at 1.37 $<$ z $<$ 1.63. The clusters have 113 spectroscopically confirmed members combined, with 8-45 confirmed members each. We construct $Ks$-band-selected photometric catalogs for each cluster with an average of 11 photometric bands ranging from $u$ to 8 $\mu$m. We compare our cluster galaxies to a field sample derived from a similar $Ks$-band-selected catalog in the UltraVISTA/COSMOS field. The SMFs resemble those of the field, but with signs of environmental quenching. We find that 30 $\pm$ 20\% of galaxies that would normally be forming stars in the field are quenched in the clusters. The environmental quenching efficiency shows little dependence on projected cluster-centric distance out to $\sim$ 4 Mpc, providing tentative evidence of pre-processing and/or galactic conformity in this redshift range. We also compile the available data on environmental quenching efficiencies from the literature, and find that the quenching efficiency in clusters and in groups appears to decline with increasing redshift in a manner consistent with previous results and expectations based on halo mass growth.
  • This study explored the GALEX ultraviolet (UV) properties of optical red sequence galaxies in 4 rich Abell clusters at z \leq 0.1. In particular, we tried to find a hint of merger-induced recent star formation (RSF) in red sequence galaxies. Using the NUV - r' colors of the galaxies, RSF fractions were derived based on various criteria for post-merger galaxies and normal galaxies. Following k-correction, about 36% of the post-merger galaxies were classified as RSF galaxies with a conservative criterion (NUV - r' \leq 5), and that number was doubled (~ 72%) when using a generous criterion (NUV - r' \leq 5.4). The trend was the same when we restricted the sample to galaxies within 0.5xR_{200}. Post-merger galaxies with strong UV emission showed more violent, asymmetric features in the deep optical images. The RSF fractions did not show any trend along the clustocentric distance within R_{200}. We performed a Dressler-Shectman test to check whether the RSF galaxies had any correlation with the sub-structures in the galaxy clusters. Within R_{200} of each cluster, the RSF galaxies did not appear to be preferentially related to the clusters' sub-structures. Our results suggested that only 30% of RSF red sequence galaxies show morphological hints of recent galaxy mergers. This implies that internal processes (e.g., stellar mass-loss or hot gas cooling) for the supply of cold gas to early-type galaxies may play a significant role in the residual star formation of early-type galaxies at a recent epoch.
  • We study the slope, intercept, and scatter of the color-magnitude and color-mass relations for a sample of ten infrared red-sequence-selected clusters at z ~ 1. The quiescent galaxies in these clusters formed the bulk of their stars above z ~ 3 with an age spread {\Delta}t ~ 1 Gyr. We compare UVJ color-color and spectroscopic-based galaxy selection techniques, and find a 15% difference in the galaxy populations classified as quiescent by these methods. We compare the color-magnitude relations from our red-sequence selected sample with X-ray- and photometric- redshift-selected cluster samples of similar mass and redshift. Within uncertainties, we are unable to detect any difference in the ages and star formation histories of quiescent cluster members in clusters selected by different methods, suggesting that the dominant quenching mechanism is insensitive to cluster baryon partitioning at z ~ 1.
  • [Abridged] Aims: This work focuses on one lensed system, HATLAS J142935.3-002836 (H1429-0028), selected in the Herschel-ATLAS field. Gathering a rich, multi-wavelength dataset, we aim to confirm the lensing hypothesis and model the background source's morphology and dynamics, as well as to provide a full physical characterisation. Methods: Multi-wavelength high-resolution data is utilised to assess the nature of the system. A lensing-analysis algorithm which simultaneously fits different wavebands is adopted to characterise the lens. The background galaxy dynamical information is studied by reconstructing the 3-D source-plane of the ALMA CO(J:4-3) transition. Near-IR imaging from HST and Keck-AO allows to constrain rest-frame optical photometry independently for the foreground and background systems. Physical parameters (such as stellar and dust masses) are estimated via modelling of the spectral energy distribution taking into account source blending, foreground obscuration, and differential magnification. Results: The system comprises a foreground edge-on disk galaxy (at z_sp=0.218) with an almost complete Einstein ring around it. The background source (at z_sp=1.027) is magnified by a factor of ~8-10 depending on wavelength. It is comprised of two components and a tens of kpc long tidal tail resembling the Antennae merger. As a whole, the system is a massive stellar system (1.32[-0.41,+0.63] x1E11 Mo) forming stars at a rate of 394+-90 Mo/yr, and has a significant gas reservoir M_ISM = 4.6+-1.7 x1E10 Mo. Its depletion time due to star formation alone is thus expected to be tau_SF=M_ISM/SFR=117+-51 Myr. The dynamical mass of one of the components is estimated to be 5.8+-1.7 x1E10 Mo, and, together with the photometric total mass estimate, it implies that H1429-0028 is a major merger system (1:2.8[-1.5,+1.8]).
  • We analyse the extended, ionized-gas emission of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) at $0<z<1$ from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We discuss different possible sources of ionization and favour star-formation as the main cause of the observed emission. 10 galaxies have disturbed gas kinematics, while 14 have rotating gas disks. In addition, 15 galaxies are in the field, while 9 are in the infall regions of clusters. This implies that, if the gas has an internal origin, this is likely stripped as the galaxies get closer to the cluster centre. If the gas instead comes from an external source, then our results suggest that this is more likely acquired outside the cluster environment, where galaxy-galaxy interactions more commonly take place. We analyse the Tully-Fisher relation of the ETGs with gas disks, and compare them to EDisCS spirals. Taking a matched range of redshifts, $M_{B}<-20$, and excluding galaxies with large velocity uncertainties, we find that, at fixed rotational velocity, ETGs are 1.7 mag fainter in $M_{B}$ than spirals. At fixed stellar mass, we also find that ETGs have systematically lower specific star-formation rates than spirals. This study constitutes an important step forward towards the understanding of the evolution of the complex ISM in ETGs by significantly extending the look-back-time baseline explored so far.
  • We present the stellar mass functions (SMFs) of star-forming and quiescent galaxies from observations of 10 rich clusters in the Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS) in the redshift range 0.86<z<1.34. We compare our results with field measurements at similar redshifts using data from a Ks-band selected catalogue of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. We construct a Ks-band selected multi-colour catalogue for the clusters in 11 photometric bands covering u-8um, and estimate photometric redshifts and stellar masses using SED fitting techniques. To correct for interlopers in our cluster sample, we use the deep spectroscopic component of GCLASS, which contains spectra for 1282 identified cluster and field galaxies taken with Gemini/GMOS. Both the photometric and spectroscopic samples are sufficiently deep that we can probe the SMF down to masses of 10^10 Msun. We distinguish between star-forming and quiescent galaxies using the rest-frame U-V versus V-J diagram, and find that the best-fitting Schechter parameters alpha and M* are similar within the uncertainties for these galaxy types within the different environments. However, there is a significant difference in the shape and normalisation of the total SMF between the clusters and the field sample. This difference in the total SMF is primarily a reflection of the increased fraction of quiescent galaxies in high-density environments. We apply a simple quenching model that includes components of mass- and environment-driven quenching, and find that in this picture 45% of the star-forming galaxies, which normally would be forming stars in the field, are quenched by the cluster. If galaxies in clusters and the field quench their star formation via different mechanisms, these processes have to conspire in such a way that the shapes of the quiescent and star-forming SMF remain similar in these different environments.
  • We perform a morphological study of 124 spectroscopically confirmed cluster galaxies in the z=0.84 galaxy cluster RX J0152.7-1357. Our classification scheme includes color information, visual morphology, and 1-component and 2-component light profile fitting derived from Hubble Space Telescope riz imaging. We adopt a modified version of a detailed classification scheme previously used in studies of field galaxies and found to be correlated with kinematic features of those galaxies. We compare our cluster galaxy morphologies to those of field galaxies at similar redshift. We also compare galaxy morphologies in regions of the cluster with different dark-matter density as determined by weak-lensing maps. We find an early-type fraction for the cluster population as a whole of 47%, about 2.8 times higher than the field, and similar to the dynamically young cluster MS 1054 at similar redshift. We find the most drastic change in morphology distribution between the low and intermediate dark matter density regions within the cluster, with the early type fraction doubling and the peculiar fraction dropping by nearly half. The peculiar fraction drops more drastically than the spiral fraction going from the outskirts to the intermediate-density regions. This suggests that many galaxies falling into clusters at z~0.8 may evolve directly from peculiar, merging, and compact systems into early-type galaxies, without having the chance to first evolve into a regular spiral galaxy.
  • We present a new two-color algorithm, the "Stellar Bump Sequence" (SBS), that is optimized for robustly identifying candidate high-redshift galaxy clusters in combined wide-field optical and mid-infrared (MIR) data. The SBS algorithm is a fusion of the well-tested cluster red-sequence method of Gladders & Yee (2000) with the MIR 3.6um - 4.5um cluster detection method developed by Papovich (2008). As with the cluster red-sequence method, the SBS identifies candidate overdensities within 3.6um - 4.5um color slices, which are the equivalent of a rest-frame 1.6um stellar bump "red-sequence". In addition to employing the MIR colors of galaxies, the SBS algorithm incorporates an optical/MIR (z' - 3.6um) color cut. This cut effectively eliminates foreground 0.2 < z < 0.4 galaxies which have 3.6um - 4.5um colors that are similarly red as z > 1.0 galaxies and add noise when searching for high-redshift galaxy overdensities. We demonstrate using the z ~ 1 GCLASS cluster sample that similar to the red sequence, the stellar bump sequence appears to be a ubiquitous feature of high-redshift clusters, and that within that sample the color of the stellar bump sequence increases monotonically with redshift and provides photometric redshifts accurate to dz = 0.05. We apply the SBS method in the XMM-LSS SWIRE field and show that it robustly recovers the majority of confirmed optical, MIR, and X-ray-selected clusters at z > 1.0 in that field. Lastly, we present confirmation of SpARCS J022427-032354 at z = 1.63, a new cluster detected with the method and confirmed with 12 high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts obtained using FORS2 on the VLT. We conclude with a discussion of future prospects for using the algorithm.
  • We confirm the detection of 3 groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z~1.3, and give their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies as compared to the central clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453, selecting 89 galaxies in the clusters and 74 galaxies in the groups. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30% -40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g. based on Sersic index). In luminosity selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of Sa galaxies. The ETG fractions never rise above ~50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in clusters at z~1. However, ETG plus Sa fractions are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z~1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as Sas might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples, the ETG fraction show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations occur at lower masses and densities. The ETG mass-size relation shows evolution towards smaller sizes at higher redshift in both clusters and groups, while the late-type mass-size relation matches that observed locally. The group ETG red sequence shows lower zero points and larger scatters than in clusters, both expected to be an indication of a younger galaxy population. The estimated age difference is small when compared to the difference in age at different galaxy masses.
  • We evaluate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties at 0.85 < z < 1.20 using a 3.6um-selected spectroscopic sample of 797 cluster and field galaxies drawn from the GCLASS survey. We confirm that for galaxies with LogM* > 9.3 the well-known correlations between environment and properties such as star-forming fraction (f_SF), SFR, SSFR, D(4000), and color are already in place at z ~ 1. We separate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxies by comparing the properties of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at fixed environment, and fixed stellar mass. The SSFR of star-forming galaxies at fixed environment is correlated with stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass it is independent of environment. The same trend exists for the D(4000) measures of both the star-forming and quiescent galaxies and shows that their properties are determined primarily by their stellar mass, not by their environment. Instead, it appears that environment's primary role is to control the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Using the spectra we identify candidate poststarburst galaxies and find that those with 9.3 < LogM* < 10.7 are 3.1 +/- 1.1 times more common in high-density regions compared to low-density regions. The clear association of poststarbursts with high-density regions as well as the lack of a correlation between the SSFRs and D(4000)s of star-forming galaxies with their environment suggests that at z ~ 1 the environmental-quenching timescale must be rapid. Lastly, we construct a simple quenching model which demonstrates that the lack of a correlation between the D(4000) of quiescent galaxies and their environment results naturally if self quenching dominates over environmental quenching at z > 1, or if the evolution of the self-quenching rate mirrors the evolution of the environmental-quenching rate at z > 1, regardless of which dominates.
  • The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a z'-passband imaging survey of the 50 deg^2 Spitzer SWIRE Legacy fields, designed with the primary aim of creating the first large, homogeneously selected sample of massive clusters at z>1. SpARCS uses an infrared adaptation of the two-filter cluster red-sequence technique. In this paper we report Keck/LRIS spectroscopic confirmation of two new exceptionally rich galaxy clusters, SpARCS J161315+564930 at z=0.871+/-0.002, with 14 high-confidence members and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of sigma_v= 1230+/-320 km s^-1, and SpARCS J161641+554513 at z=1.161+/-0.003, with seven high-confidence members (including one AGN) and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of sigma_v=950+/-330 km s^-1. We also report confirmation of a third new system, SpARCS J161037+552417 at z=1.210+/-0.002, with seven high-confidence members and a rest-frame velocity dispersion of sigma_v=410+/-300 km s^-1. These three new spectroscopically confirmed clusters further demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of two-filter imaging for detecting bona fide galaxy clusters at high redshift. We conclude by demonstrating that prospects are good for the current generation of surveys aiming to estimate cluster redshifts and masses at z>~1 directly from optical-infrared imaging.
  • The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a deep z'-band imaging survey covering the Spitzer SWIRE Legacy fields designed to create the first large homogeneously-selected sample of massive clusters at z > 1 using an infrared adaptation of the cluster red-sequence method. We present an overview of the northern component of the survey which has been observed with CFHT/MegaCam and covers 28.3 deg^2. The southern component of the survey was observed with CTIO/MOSAICII, covers 13.6 deg^2, and is summarized in a companion paper by Wilson et al. (2008). We also present spectroscopic confirmation of two rich cluster candidates at z ~ 1.2. Based on Nod-and-Shuffle spectroscopy from GMOS-N on Gemini there are 17 and 28 confirmed cluster members in SpARCS J163435+402151 and SpARCS J163852+403843 which have spectroscopic redshifts of 1.1798 and 1.1963, respectively. The clusters have velocity dispersions of 490 +/- 140 km/s and 650 +/- 160 km/s, respectively which imply masses (M200) of (1.0 +/- 0.9) x 10^{14} M_{solar} and (2.4 +/- 1.8) x 10^{14} M_{solar}. Confirmation of these candidates as bona fide massive clusters demonstrates that two-filter imaging is an effective, yet observationally efficient, method for selecting clusters at z > 1.
  • The Spitzer Adaptation of the Red-sequence Cluster Survey (SpARCS) is a z'-passband imaging survey, consisting of deep (z' ~ 24 AB) observations made from both hemispheres using the CFHT 3.6m and CTIO 4m telescopes. The survey was designed with the primary aim of detecting galaxy clusters at z >~ 1. In tandem with pre-existing 3.6um observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope SWIRE Legacy Survey, SpARCS detects clusters using an infrared adaptation of the two-filter red-sequence cluster technique. The total effective area of the SpARCS cluster survey is 41.9 deg^2. In this paper, we provide an overview of the 13.6 deg^2 Southern CTIO/MOSAICII observations. The 28.3 deg^2 Northern CFHT/MegaCam observations are summarized in a companion paper by Muzzin et al. (2008). In this paper, we also report spectroscopic confirmation of SpARCS J003550-431224, a very rich galaxy cluster at z = 1.335, discovered in the ELAIS-S1 field. To date, this is the highest spectroscopically confirmed redshift for a galaxy cluster discovered using the red-sequence technique. Based on nine confirmed members, SpARCS J003550-431224 has a preliminary velocity dispersion of 1050 +/- 230 km/s. With its proven capability for efficient cluster detection, SpARCS is a demonstration that we have entered an era of large, homogeneously-selected z > 1 cluster surveys.
  • (Abridged) We report a discovery of possible large-scale structures around the RDCS J1252.9-2927 cluster at z=1.24 based on photometric redshifts. We carried out multi-band wide-field imaging with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope and WFCAM on the United Kingdom Infra-Red Telescope (UKIRT). The distribution of photo-z selected galaxies reveals clumpy structures surrounding the central cluster. We compare the observed structure with an X-ray map and find that two of the four plausible clumps show significant X-ray emissions and one with a marginal detection, which strongly suggest that they are dynamically bound systems. Following the discovery of the possible large-scale structure, we carried out deeper SOFI K_s-band imaging with New Technology Telescope on the four plausible clumps. We construct the optical-to-near-infrared colour-magnitude diagrams of the galaxies in the clumps, and find that the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) of the red galaxies in the clumps is sharply truncated below K_s=22. Interestingly, the main cluster shows a clear relation down to K_s=23 (Lidman et al. 2004). We suggest that galaxies follow the 'environment-dependent down-sizing' evolution. Massive galaxies in high density environments first stop forming stars and become red. Less massive galaxies in less dense environments become red at later times. Based on a few assumptions, we predict that the brightest tip of the CMR appears at z~2.5.
  • Color-magnitude relations have been derived in the clusters RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 at z~1.26. The color-magnitude relation was determined from Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging in the WFC F775W (i_775) and F850LP (z_850) filters combined with ground-based spectroscopy. Early-type cluster candidates have been identified according to the Postman et al. morphological classification. In both clusters the bright red early-type population defines a tight color-magnitude relation very similar in color, although the two clusters present different X-ray luminosities and shapes, with RX J0849+4452 being three times more X-ray luminous and more compact, and having a temperature two times higher. The elliptical galaxy color-magnitude relations (CMR) in RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 show an intrinsic (i_775-z_850) color scatter of 0.026 +/- 0.012 mag and 0.024 +/- 0.015 mag, respectively, within 2 arcminutes (~1Mpc at z=1.26) from the cluster X-ray emission centers. Simple modeling of the scatters using stellar population models from Bruzual and Charlot, gives a mean luminosity-weighted age t > 2.5 Gyr (z_f > 2.75). S0 galaxies follow the elliptical CMR; they show larger scatters about the CMR. The intrinsic scatter decreases and the CMR slopes are steeper at smaller radii, within both clusters. We conclude that old stellar populations in cluster elliptical galaxies are already in place at z=1.26, both in the more evolved cluster RX J0849+4452, and in its less evolved companion RX J0848+4453. Even at a lookback time of 9 Gyr, in the early merging and buildup of massive clusters, the bulk of the stellar content of the bright elliptical galaxy population was in place - apparently formed some 2.5~Gyr earlier at z~3
  • Self-gravitating systems such as elliptical galaxies appear to have a constant specific entropy and obey a scaling law relating their potential energy to their mass. These properties can be interpreted as due to the physical processes involved in the formation of these structures. Dark matter haloes obtained through numerical simulations have also been found to obey a scaling law relating their potential energy to their mass with the same slope as ellipticals. Since the X-ray gas in clusters is weakly dissipative, we have checked the hypothesis that it might verify similar properties. We have analyzed ROSAT-PSPC images of 24 clusters, and also found that: 1) the S\'ersic law parameters (intensity, shape and scale) describing the X-ray gas emission are correlated two by two; 2) the hot gas in all these clusters roughly has the same specific entropy; 3) a scaling law linking the cluster potential energy to the mass of the X-ray gas is observed, with the same slope as for elliptical galaxies and dark matter haloes.
  • We present high quality BVRI CCD photometry of the variable star V716 Monocerotis (= NSV 03775). We confirm it to be an RR Lyrae star of variability type ab (i.e. a fundamental mode pulsator), and determine its metallicity ([Fe/H] = -1.33 +/- 0.25), luminosity (Mv = 0.80 +/- 0.06), and foreground reddening (E(B-V) = 0.05-0.17) from the Fourier components of its light curve. These parameters indicate a distance of 4.1 +/- 0.3 kpc, placing V716 Mon near the plane of the Galaxy well outside the solar circle. This research was conducted as part of the 1999 Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) and Practicas de Investigacion en Astronomia (PIA) Programs at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO).