• We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations toward the high-mass star-forming region IRAS 18566+0408. Observations at 1.3 mm continuum and in several molecular line transitions were performed in the compact (2."4 angular resolution) and very-extended (~0."4 angular resolution) configurations. The continuum emission from the compact configuration shows a dust core of 150 Msun, while the very-extended configuration reveals a dense (2.6 x 10^7 cm^-3) and compact (~4,000 AU) condensation of 8 Msun. We detect 31 molecular transitions from 14 species including CO isotopologues, SO, CH3OH, OCS, and CH3CN. Using the different k-ladders of the CH3CN line, we derive a rotational temperature at the location of the continuum peak of 240 K. The 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), and SO(6_5-5_4) lines reveal a molecular outflow at PA ~135^o centered at the continuum peak. The extended 12CO(2-1) emission has been recovered with the IRAM 30 m telescope observations. Using the combined data set, we derive an outflow mass of 16.8 Msun. The chemically rich spectrum and the high rotational temperature confirm that IRAS 18566+0408 is harboring a hot molecular core. We find no clear velocity gradient that could suggest the presence of a rotational disk-like structure, even at the high resolution observations obtained with the very-extended configuration.
  • We report on subarcsecond observations of complex organic molecules (COMs) in the high-mass protostar IRAS20126+4104 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in its most extended configurations. In addition to the simple molecules SO, HNCO and H2-13CO, we detect emission from CH3CN, CH3OH, HCOOH, HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3, CH3CH2CN, CH3COCH3, NH2CN, and (CH2OH)2. SO and HNCO present a X-shaped morphology consistent with tracing the outflow cavity walls. Most of the COMs have their peak emission at the putative position of the protostar, but also show an extension towards the south(east), coinciding with an H2 knot from the jet at about 800-1000 au from the protostar. This is especially clear in the case of H2-13CO and CH3OCH3. We fitted the spectra at representative positions for the disc and the outflow, and found that the abundances of most COMs are comparable at both positions, suggesting that COMs are enhanced in shocks as a result of the passage of the outflow. By coupling a parametric shock model to a large gas-grain chemical network including COMs, we find that the observed COMs should survive in the gas phase for about 2000 yr, comparable to the shock lifetime estimated from the water masers at the outflow position. Overall, our data indicate that COMs in IRAS20126+4104 may arise not only from the disc, but also from dense and hot regions associated with the outflow.
  • The SKA will be a state of the art radiotelescope optimized for both large area surveys as well as for deep pointed observations. In this paper we analyze the impact that the SKA will have on Galactic studies, starting from the immense legacy value of the all-sky survey proposed by the continuum SWG but also presenting some areas of Galactic Science that particularly benefit from SKA observations both surveys and pointed. The planned all-sky survey will be characterized by unique spatial resolution, sensitivity and survey speed, providing us with a wide-field atlas of the Galactic continuum emission. Synergies with existing, current and planned radio Galactic Plane surveys will be discussed. SKA will give the opportunity to create a sensitive catalog of discrete Galactic radio sources, most of them representing the interaction of stars at various stages of their evolution with the environment: complete census of all stage of HII regions evolution; complete census of late stages of stellar evolution such as PNe and SNRs; detection of stellar winds, thermal jets, Symbiotic systems, Chemically Peculiar and dMe stars, active binary systems in both flaring and quiescent states. Coherent emission events like Cyclotron Maser in the magnetospheres of different classes of stars can be detected. Pointed, deep observations will allow new insights into the physics of the coronae and plasma processes in active stellar systems and single stars, enabling the detection of flaring activity in larger stellar population for a better comprehension of the mechanism of energy release in the atmospheres of stars with different masses and age.
  • In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed with the PdBI in the most extended configuration the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO(2-1) emission of four massive cores. We detect dust condensations down to ~0.3 Msun and separate millimeter sources down to 0.4" or ~1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO(2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, ~30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into ~4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and found no correlation of any of these parameters with the fragmentation level. In order to investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, radiative feedback and turbulence in the fragmentation process, we compared our observations to radiation magneto-hydrodynamic simulations, and found that the low-fragmented regions are well reproduced in the magnetized core case, while the highly-fragmented regions are consistent with cores where turbulence dominates over the magnetic field. Overall, our study suggests that the fragmentation in massive dense cores could be determined by the initial magnetic field/turbulence balance in each particular core.
  • This work presents a detailed study of the gas kinematics towards the "Hot Molecular Core" (HMC) G31.41+0.31 via multi-epoch VLBI observations of the H2O 22 GHz and CH3OH 6.7 GHz masers, and single-epoch VLBI of the OH 1.6 GHz masers. Water masers present a symmetric spatial distribution with respect to the HMC center, where two nearby (0.2" apart), compact, VLA sources (labeled "A" and "B") are previously detected. The spatial distribution of a first group of water masers, named "J1", is well fit with an elliptical profile, and the maser proper motions mainly diverge from the ellipse center, with average speed of 36 km s-1. These findings strongly suggest that the "J1" water maser group traces the heads of a young (dynamical time of 1.3 10^3 yr), powerful (momentum rate of ~0.2 M_sun yr-1 km s-1), collimated (semi-opening angle ~10 deg) jet emerging from a MYSO located close (within 0.15") to the VLA source "B". Most of the water features not belonging to "J1" present an elongated (about 2" in size), NE--SW oriented (PA = 70 deg), S-shape distribution, which we denote with the label "J2". The elongated distribution of the "J2" group and the direction of motion, approximately parallel to the direction of elongation, of most "J2" water masers suggests the presence of another collimated outflow, emitted from a MYSO near the VLA source "A". The orientation of the "J2" jet agrees well with that (PA = 68 deg) of the well-defined V_LSR gradient across the HMC revealed by previous interferometric, thermal line observations. Furthermore, the "J2" jet is powerful enough to sustain the large momentum rate, 0.3 M_sun yr-1 km s-1, estimated assuming that the V_LSR gradient represents a collimated outflow. These two facts lead us to favour the interpretation of the V_LSR gradient across the G31.41+0.31 HMC in terms of a compact and collimated outflow.
  • We used the CSO 10.4 meter telescope to image the 350 micron and 450 micron continuum and CO J=6-5 line emission of the IRAS 20126+4104 clump. The continuum and line observations show that the clump is isolated over a 4 pc region and has a radius of ~ 0.5 pc. Our analysis shows that the clump has a radial density profile propto r ^{-1.2} for r <~ 0.1 pc and has propto r^{-2.3} for r >~ 0.1 pc which suggests the inner region is infalling, while the infall wave has not yet reached the outer region. Assuming temperature gradient of r^{-0.35}, the power law indices become propto r ^{-0.9} for r < ~0.1 pc and propto r^{-2.0} for r >~ 0.1 pc. Based on a map of the flux ratio of 350micron/450micron, we identify three distinct regions: a bipolar feature that coincides with the large scale CO bipolar outflow; a cocoon-like region that encases the bipolar feature and has a warm surface; and a cold layer outside of the cocoon region. The complex patterns of the flux ratio map indicates that the clump is no longer uniform in terms of temperature as well as dust properties. The CO emission near the systemic velocity traces the dense clump and the outer layer of the clump shows narrow line widths (< ~3 km/s). The clump has a velocity gradient of ~ 2 km/s pc^{-1}, which we interpret as due to rotation of the clump, as the equilibrium mass (~ 200 Msun) is comparable to the LTE mass obtained from the CO line. Over a scale of ~ 1 pc, the clump rotates in the opposite sense with respect to the >~ 0.03 pc disk associated with the (proto)star. This is one of four objects in high-mass and low-mass star forming regions for which a discrepancy between the rotation sense of the envelope and the core has been found, suggesting that such a complex kinematics may not be unusual in star forming regions.
  • Theory predicts and observations confirm that low-mass stars (like the Sun) in their early life grow by accreting gas from the surrounding material. But for stars ~ 10 times more massive than the Sun (~10 M_sun), the powerful stellar radiation is expected to inhibit accretion and thus limit the growth of their mass. Clearly, stars with masses >10 M_sun exist, so there must be a way for them to form. The problem may be solved by non-spherical accretion, which allows some of the stellar photons to escape along the symmetry axis where the density is lower. The recent detection of rotating disks and toroids around very young massive stars has lent support to the idea that high-mass (> 8 M_sun) stars could form in this way. Here we report observations of an ammonia line towards a high-mass star forming region. We conclude from the data that the gas is falling inwards towards a very young star of ~20 M_sun, in line with theoretical predictions of non-spherical accretion.
  • We report on new aspects of the star-forming region S235AB revealed through high-resolution observations at radio and mid-infrared wavelengths. Using the Very Large Array, we carried out sensitive observations of S235AB in the cm continuum (6, 3.6, 1.3, and 0.7) and in the 22 GHz water maser line. These were complemented with Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Array Camera archive data to clarify the correspondence between radio and IR sources. We made also use of newly presented data from the Medicina water maser patrol, started in 1987, to study the variability of the water masers found in the region. S235A is a classical HII region whose structure is now well resolved. To the south, no radio continuum emission is detected either from the compact molecular core or from the jet-like structure observed at 3.3 mm, suggesting emission from dust in both cases. We find two new compact radio continuum sources (VLA-1 and VLA-2) and three separate maser spots. VLA-1 coincides with one of the maser spots and with a previously identified IR source (M1). VLA-2 lies towards S235B and represents the first radio detection from this peculiar nebula that may represent an ionized wind from a more evolved star. The two other maser spots coincide with an elongated structure previously observed within the molecular core in the C34S line. This structure is perpendicular to a bipolar molecular outflow observed in HCO+(1-0) and may trace the associated equatorial disk. The Spitzer images reveal a red object towards the molecular core. This is the most viable candidate for the embedded source originating the outflow and maser phenomenology. The picture emerging from these and previous data shows the extreme complexity of a small (< 0.5 pc) star-forming region where widely different stages of stellar evolution are present.
  • In an ongoing effort to identify and study high-mass protostellar candidates we have observed in various tracers a sample of 235 sources selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog, mostly with dec < -30 deg, with the SEST antenna at millimeter wavelengths. The sample contains 142 Low sources and 93 High, which are believed to be in different evolutionary stages. Both sub-samples have been studied in detail by comparing their physical properties and morphologies. Massive dust clumps have been detected in all but 8 regions, with usually more than one clump per region. The dust emission shows a variety of complex morphologies, sometimes with multiple clumps forming filaments or clusters. The mean clump has a linear size of ~0.5 pc, a mass of ~320 Msolar for a dust temperature Td=30 K, an H_2 density of 9.5E5 cm-3, and a surface density of 0.4 g cm-2. The median values are 0.4 pc, 102 Msolar, 4E4 cm-3, and 0.14 g cm-2, respectively. The mean value of the luminosity-to-mass ratio, L/M ~99 Lsolar/Msolar, suggests that the sources are in a young, pre-ultracompact HII phase. We have compared the millimeter continuum maps with images of the mid-IR MSX emission, and have discovered 95 massive millimeter clumps non-MSX emitters, either diffuse or point-like, that are potential prestellar or precluster cores. The physical properties of these clumps are similar to those of the others, apart from the mass that is ~3 times lower than for clumps with MSX counterpart. Such a difference could be due to the potential prestellar clumps having a lower dust temperature. The mass spectrum of the clumps with masses above M ~100 Msolar is best fitted with a power-law dN/dM proportional to M-alpha with alpha=2.1, consistent with the Salpeter (1955) stellar IMF, with alpha=2.35.
  • We report on a water maser survey towards a sample of 27 planetary nebulae (PNe) using the Robledo de Chavela and Medicina single-dish antennas, as well as the Very Large Array (VLA). Two detections have been obtained: the already known water maser emission in K 3-35, and a new cluster of masers in IRAS 17347-3139. This low rate of detections is compatible with the short life-time of water molecules in PNe (~100 yr). The water maser cluster at IRAS 17347-3139 are distributed on a ellipse of size ~ 0.2" x 0.1", spatially associated with compact 1.3 cm continuum emission (simultaneously observed with the VLA). From archive VLA continuum data at 4.9, 8.4, and 14.9 GHz, a spectral index alpha = 0.76 +- 0.03 is derived for this radio source, which is consistent with either a partially optically thick ionized region or with an ionized wind. However, the latter scenario can be ruled out on mass-loss considerations, thus indicating that this source is probably a young PN. The spatial distribution and the radial velocities of the water masers are suggestive of a rotating and expanding maser ring, tracing the innermost regions of a torus formed at the end of the AGB phase. Given that the 1.3 cm continuum emission peak is located near one of the tips of the major axis of the ellipse of masers, we speculate on a possible binary nature of IRAS 17347-3139, where the radio continuum emission could belong to one of the components and the water masers would be associated with a companion.
  • The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope has been used to obtain submillimeter and millimeter continuum photometry of a sample of 30 IRAS sources previously studied in molecular lines and centimeter radio continuum. All the sources have IRAS colours typical of very young stellar objects (YSOs) and are associated with dense gas. In spite of their high luminosities (L>10000 solar units), only ten of these sources are also associated with a radio counterpart. In 17 cases we could identify a clear peak of millimeter emission associated with the IRAS source, while in 9 sources the millimeter emission was extended or faint and a clear peak could not be identified; upper limits were found in 4 cases only. Using simple greybody fitting model to the observed SED, we derive global properties of the circumstellar dust. The dust temperature varies from 24 K to 45 K, while the exponent of the dust emissivity vs frequency power-law spans a range 1.56<beta<2.38, characteristic of silicate dust; total circumstellar masses range up to more than 500 solar masses. We find that for sources with comparable luminosities, the total column densities derived from the dust masses do not distinguish between sources with and without radio counterpart. We interpret this result as an indication that dust does not play a dominant role in inhibiting the formation of the HII region. We examine several scenarios for their origin in terms of newborn ZAMS stars and although most of these fail to explain the observations, we cannot exclude that these sources are young stars already on the ZAMS with modest residual accretion that quenches the expansion of the HII region. Finally, we consider the possibility that the IRAS sources are high-mass pre-ZAMS (or pre-H-burning) objects deriving most of the emitted luminosity from accretion.
  • IRAS 23385+6053 is a Young Stellar Object with luminosity 16,000 solar luminosities at a kinematic distance of 4.9 kpc. This candidate precursor of an ultracompact HII region is associated with a millimeter source detected at the JCMT but is undetected at centimeter wavelengths with the VLA. We observed this source with the OVRO millimeter array at 3.4 mm in the continuum, HCO+(1-0), H13CO+(1-0) and SiO(v=0, 2-1) line emission, and with CAM aboard ISO at 6.75 and 15 um. The IRAS source is coincident with a 3.4 mm compact (r~0.048 pc) and massive (M~370 solar masses) core, which is undetected at 15 um to a 3 sigma level of 6 mJy; this is compatible with the derived H2 column density of 2x10(24) and the estimated visual extinction of about 2000 mag. We find L(submm)/L(bol)>10(-3) and M(env)/M(star)>>1, typical of Class 0 objects. The source is also associated with a compact outflow characterized by a size similar to the core radius, a dynamical timescale of about 7,000 years, and a mass loss rate of about 10(-3) solar masses/year. The axis of the outflow is oriented nearly perpendicular to the plane of the sky, ruling out the possibility that the non-detection at 15 um is the result of a geometric effect. All these properties suggest that IRAS 23385+6053 is the first example of a bona fide massive Class 0 object.