• We present one of the most ultraviolet (UV) luminous Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) (J1432+3358) at z=2.78, discovered in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) Bootes field. The R-band magnitude of J1432+3358 is 22.29 AB, more than two magnitudes brighter than typical L* LBGs at this redshift. The deep z-band image reveals two components of J1432+3358 separated by 1.0" with flux ratio of 3:1. The high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) rest-frame UV spectrum shows Lya emission line and interstellar medium absorption lines. The absence of NV and CIV emission lines, the non-detection in X-ray and radio wavelengths and mid-infrared (MIR) colors indicate no or weak active galactic nuclei (AGN) (<10%) in this galaxy. The galaxy shows broader line profile with the full width half maximum (FWHM) of about 1000 km/s and larger outflow velocity (~500 km/s) than those of typical z~3 LBGs. The physical properties are derived by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) with stellar synthesis models. The dust extinction, E(B-V)=0.12, is similar to that in normal LBGs. The star formation rates (SFRs) derived from the SED fitting and the dust-corrected UV flux are consistent with each other, ~300 Msun/yr, and the stellar mass is 1.3e11 Msun. The SFR and stellar mass in J1432+3358 are about an order of magnitude higher than those in normal LBGs. The SED-fitting results support that J1432+3358 has a continuous star formation history with the star formation episode of 630 Myr. The morphology of J1432+3358 and its physical properties suggest that J1432+3358 is in an early phase of 3:1 merger process. The unique properties and the low space number density (~1e-7 Mpc^{-3})are consistent with the interpretation that such galaxies are either found in a short unobscured phase of the star formation or that small fraction of intensive star-forming galaxies are unobscured.
  • We obtained U_330 and B band images of the M31 nucleus using the High Resolution Camera of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The spatial resolution in the U_330-band, 0.03" FWHM, or 0.1 pc at M31, is sufficient to resolve the outskirts of the compact cluster (P3) of UV-bright stars surrounding the M31 black hole. The center of the cluster is marked by an extended source that is both brighter and redder than the other point sources within P3; it is likely to be a blend of several bright stars. We hypothesize that it marks the location of the M31 black hole. Both stellar photometry and a surface brightness fluctuation analysis, show that the P3 stellar population is consistent with early-type main sequence stars formed in a ~100 - ~200 Myr old starburst population. Evolutionary tracks of post early asymptotic giant-branch stars, associated with late-stage evolution of an old population, also traverse the U and U-B domain occupied by the P3 stars; but we argue that only a few stars could be accounted for that way. PEAGB evolution is very rapid, and there is no progenitor population of red giants associated with P3. The result that P3 comprises young stars is consistent with inferences from earlier HST observations of the integrated light of the cluster. Like the Milky Way, M31 harbors a black hole closely surrounded by apparently young stars.
  • We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. (1994) by using high-quality data obtained with several space and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared IRS spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite spectral energy distributions for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid and near-infrared.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Paul A. Abell, Julius Allison, Scott F. Anderson, John R. Andrew, J. Roger P. Angel, Lee Armus, David Arnett, S. J. Asztalos, Tim S. Axelrod, Stephen Bailey, D. R. Ballantyne, Justin R. Bankert, Wayne A. Barkhouse, Jeffrey D. Barr, L. Felipe Barrientos, Aaron J. Barth, James G. Bartlett, Andrew C. Becker, Jacek Becla, Timothy C. Beers, Joseph P. Bernstein, Rahul Biswas, Michael R. Blanton, Joshua S. Bloom, John J. Bochanski, Pat Boeshaar, Kirk D. Borne, Marusa Bradac, W. N. Brandt, Carrie R. Bridge, Michael E. Brown, Robert J. Brunner, James S. Bullock, Adam J. Burgasser, James H. Burge, David L. Burke, Phillip A. Cargile, Srinivasan Chandrasekharan, George Chartas, Steven R. Chesley, You-Hua Chu, David Cinabro, Mark W. Claire, Charles F. Claver, Douglas Clowe, A. J. Connolly, Kem H. Cook, Jeff Cooke, Asantha Cooray, Kevin R. Covey, Christopher S. Culliton, Roelof de Jong, Willem H. de Vries, Victor P. Debattista, Francisco Delgado, Ian P. Dell'Antonio, Saurav Dhital, Rosanne Di Stefano, Mark Dickinson, Benjamin Dilday, S.G. Djorgovski, Gregory Dobler, Ciro Donalek, Gregory Dubois-Felsmann, Josef Durech, Ardis Eliasdottir, Michael Eracleous, Laurent Eyer, Emilio E. Falco, Xiaohui Fan, Christopher D. Fassnacht, Harry C. Ferguson, Yanga R. Fernandez, Brian D. Fields, Douglas Finkbeiner, Eduardo E. Figueroa, Derek B. Fox, Harold Francke, James S. Frank, Josh Frieman, Sebastien Fromenteau, Muhammad Furqan, Gaspar Galaz, A. Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Eric Gawiser, John Geary, Perry Gee, Robert R. Gibson, Kirk Gilmore, Emily A. Grace, Richard F. Green, William J. Gressler, Carl J. Grillmair, Salman Habib, J. S. Haggerty, Mario Hamuy, Alan W. Harris, Suzanne L. Hawley, Alan F. Heavens, Leslie Hebb, Todd J. Henry, Edward Hileman, Eric J. Hilton, Keri Hoadley, J. B. Holberg, Matt J. Holman, Steve B. Howell, Leopoldo Infante, Zeljko Ivezic, Suzanne H. Jacoby, Bhuvnesh Jain, R, Jedicke, M. James Jee, J. Garrett Jernigan, Saurabh W. Jha, Kathryn V. Johnston, R. Lynne Jones, Mario Juric, Mikko Kaasalainen, Styliani Kafka, Steven M. Kahn, Nathan A. Kaib, Jason Kalirai, Jeff Kantor, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Charles R. Keeton, Richard Kessler, Zoran Knezevic, Adam Kowalski, Victor L. Krabbendam, K. Simon Krughoff, Shrinivas Kulkarni, Stephen Kuhlman, Mark Lacy, Sebastien Lepine, Ming Liang, Amy Lien, Paulina Lira, Knox S. Long, Suzanne Lorenz, Jennifer M. Lotz, R. H. Lupton, Julie Lutz, Lucas M. Macri, Ashish A. Mahabal, Rachel Mandelbaum, Phil Marshall, Morgan May, Peregrine M. McGehee, Brian T. Meadows, Alan Meert, Andrea Milani, Christopher J. Miller, Michelle Miller, David Mills, Dante Minniti, David Monet, Anjum S. Mukadam, Ehud Nakar, Douglas R. Neill, Jeffrey A. Newman, Sergei Nikolaev, Martin Nordby, Paul O'Connor, Masamune Oguri, John Oliver, Scot S. Olivier, Julia K. Olsen, Knut Olsen, Edward W. Olszewski, Hakeem Oluseyi, Nelson D. Padilla, Alex Parker, Joshua Pepper, John R. Peterson, Catherine Petry, Philip A. Pinto, James L. Pizagno, Bogdan Popescu, Andrej Prsa, Veljko Radcka, M. Jordan Raddick, Andrew Rasmussen, Arne Rau, Jeonghee Rho, James E. Rhoads, Gordon T. Richards, Stephen T. Ridgway, Brant E. Robertson, Rok Roskar, Abhijit Saha, Ata Sarajedini, Evan Scannapieco, Terry Schalk, Rafe Schindler, Samuel Schmidt, Sarah Schmidt, Donald P. Schneider, German Schumacher, Ryan Scranton, Jacques Sebag, Lynn G. Seppala, Ohad Shemmer, Joshua D. Simon, M. Sivertz, Howard A. Smith, J. Allyn Smith, Nathan Smith, Anna H. Spitz, Adam Stanford, Keivan G. Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael A. Strauss, Christopher W. Stubbs, Donald W. Sweeney, Alex Szalay, Paula Szkody, Masahiro Takada, Paul Thorman, David E. Trilling, Virginia Trimble, Anthony Tyson, Richard Van Berg, Daniel Vanden Berk, Jake VanderPlas, Licia Verde, Bojan Vrsnak, Lucianne M. Walkowicz, Benjamin D. Wandelt, Sheng Wang, Yun Wang, Michael Warner, Risa H. Wechsler, Andrew A. West, Oliver Wiecha, Benjamin F. Williams, Beth Willman, David Wittman, Sidney C. Wolff, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Przemek Wozniak, Patrick Young, Andrew Zentner, Hu Zhan
    A survey that can cover the sky in optical bands over wide fields to faint magnitudes with a fast cadence will enable many of the exciting science opportunities of the next decade. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will have an effective aperture of 6.7 meters and an imaging camera with field of view of 9.6 deg^2, and will be devoted to a ten-year imaging survey over 20,000 deg^2 south of +15 deg. Each pointing will be imaged 2000 times with fifteen second exposures in six broad bands from 0.35 to 1.1 microns, to a total point-source depth of r~27.5. The LSST Science Book describes the basic parameters of the LSST hardware, software, and observing plans. The book discusses educational and outreach opportunities, then goes on to describe a broad range of science that LSST will revolutionize: mapping the inner and outer Solar System, stellar populations in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, the structure of the Milky Way disk and halo and other objects in the Local Volume, transient and variable objects both at low and high redshift, and the properties of normal and active galaxies at low and high redshift. It then turns to far-field cosmological topics, exploring properties of supernovae to z~1, strong and weak lensing, the large-scale distribution of galaxies and baryon oscillations, and how these different probes may be combined to constrain cosmological models and the physics of dark energy.
  • We present a deep, wide-field photometric survey of the newly-discovered Hercules dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on data from the Large Binocular Telescope. Images in B, V and r were obtained with the Large Binocular Camera covering a 23' times 23' field of view to a magnitude of ~25.5 (5 sigma). This permitted the construction of colour-magnitude diagrams that reach approximately 1.5 magnitudes below the Hercules main sequence turnoff. Three-filter photometry allowed us to preferentially select probable Hercules member stars, and examine the structure of this system at a previously unattained level. We find that the Hercules dwarf is highly elongated (3:1), considerably more so than any other dSph satellite of the Milky Way except the disrupting Sagittarius dwarf. While we cannot rule out that the unusual structure is intrinsic to Hercules as an equilibrium system, our results suggest tidal disruption as a likely cause of this highly elliptical structure. Given the relatively large Galactocentric distance of this system (132 +/- 12 kpc), signs of tidal disruption would require the Hercules dwarf to be on a highly eccentric orbit around the Milky Way.
  • We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low redshift (z<0.8) quasars observed with HST/STIS as part of a Snap project to understand the relationship between quasar outflows and luminosity. By design, all observations cover the CIV emission line. Nine of the quasars are from the Hamburg-ESO catalog, three are from the Palomar-Green catalog, and one is from the Parkes catalog. The sample contains a few interesting quasars including two broad absorption line (BAL) quasars (HE0143-3535, HE0436-2614), one quasar with a mini-BAL (HE1105-0746), and one quasar with associated narrow absorption (HE0409-5004). These BAL quasars are among the brightest known (though not the most luminous) since they lie at z<0.8. We compare the properties of these BAL quasars to the z<0.5 Palomar-Green and z>1.4 Large Bright Quasar samples. By design, our objects sample luminosities in between these two surveys, and our four absorbed objects are consistent with the v ~ L^0.62 relation derived by Laor & Brandt (2002). Another quasar, HE0441-2826, contains extremely weak emission lines and our spectrum is consistent with a simple power-law continuum. The quasar is radio-loud, but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated morphology, which argues against it being a blazar. The unusual spectrum of this quasar resembles the spectra of the quasars PG1407+265, SDSSJ1136+0242, and PKS1004+13 for which several possible explanations have been entertained.
  • We present the discovery of three z>5 quasars in the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) spectroscopic observations of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey (NDWFS) Bootes Field. These quasars were selected as part of a larger Spitzer mid-infrared quasar sample with no selection based on optical colors. The highest redshift object, NDWFS J142516.3+325409, z=5.85, is the lowest-luminosity z>5.8 quasar currently known. We compare mid-infrared techniques for identifying z>5 quasars to more traditional optical techniques and show that mid-infrared colors allow for selection of high-redshift quasars even at redshifts where quasars lie near the optical stellar locus and at z>7 where optical selection is impossible. Using the superb multi-wavelength coverage available in the NDWFS Bootes field, we construct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high-redshift quasars from observed Bw-band to 24 microns (rest-frame 600 Angstroms - 3.7 microns). We show that the three high-redshift quasars have quite similar SEDs, and the rest-frame composite SED of low-redshift quasars from the literature shows little evolution compared to our high-redshift objects. We compare the number of z>5 quasars we have discovered to the expected number from published quasar luminosity functions. While analyses of the quasar luminosity function are tenuous based on only three objects, we find that a relatively steep luminosity function with Psi L^(-3.2) provides the best agreement with the number of high-redshift quasars discovered in our survey.
  • We present simultaneous X-ray, far-ultraviolet, and near-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 7469 obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, and the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. Previous non-simultaneous observations of this galaxy found two distinct UV absorption components, at -560 and -1900 km/s, with the former as the likely counterpart of the X-ray absorber. We confirm these two absorption components in our new UV observations, in which we detect prominent O VI, Ly alpha, N V, and C IV absorption. In our Chandra spectrum we detect O VIII emission, but no significant O VIII or O VII absorption. We also detect a prominent Fe K alpha emission line in the Chandra spectrum, as well as absorption due to hydrogen-like and helium-like neon, magnesium, and silicon at velocities consistent with the -560 km/s UV absorber. The FUSE and STIS data reveal that the H I and C IV column densities in this UV- and X-ray- absorbing component have increased over time, as the UV continuum flux decreased. We use measured H I, N V, C IV, and O VI column densities to model the photoionization state of both absorbers self-consistently. We confirm the general physical picture of the outflow in which the low velocity component is a highly ionized, high density absorber with a total column density of 10^20 cm^-2, located near the broad emission line region, although due to measurable columns of N V and C IV, we assign it a somewhat smaller ionization parameter than found previously, U~1. The high velocity UV component is of lower density, log N=18.6, and likely resides farther from the central engine as we find its ionization parameter to be U=0.08.
  • We investigate the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, we define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71 (rather than the intended U-B < -0.44), implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B=-0.7 and the 2-sigma error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z<0.5. There is, however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z>0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). We find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.
  • We investigate the ultraviolet-to-optical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 17 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) using quasi-simultaneous spectrophotometry spanning 900-9000 Angstrom (rest frame). We employ data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Taking advantage of the short-wavelength coverage, we are able to study the so-called "big blue bump," the region where the energy output peaks, in detail. Most objects exhibit a spectral break around 1100 Angstrom. Although this result is formally associated with large uncertainty for some objects, there is strong evidence in the data that the far-ultraviolet spectral region is below the extrapolation of the near-ultraviolet-optical slope, indicating a spectral break around 1100 Angstrom. We compare the behavior of our sample to those of non-LTE thin-disk models covering a range in black-hole mass, Eddington ratio, disk inclination, and other parameters. The distribution of ultraviolet-optical spectral indices redward of the break, and far-ultraviolet indices shortward of the break, are in rough agreement with the models. However, we do not see a correlation between the far-ultraviolet spectral index and the black hole mass, as seen in some accretion disk models. We argue that the observed spectral break is intrinsic to AGNs, although intrinsic reddening as well as Comptonization can strongly affect the far-ultraviolet spectral index. We make our data available online in digital format.
  • The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has surveyed a large sample (> 100) of active galactic nuclei in the low redshift universe (z < 1). Its response at short wavelengths makes it possible to measure directly the EUV spectral shape of QSOs and Seyfert 1 galaxies at z < 0.3. Using archival FUSE spectra, we form a composite extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum of QSOs at z < 1 and compare it to UV/optical composite spectra of QSOs at higher redshift, particularly the composite spectrum from archival Hubble Space Telescope spectra.
  • We describe deep (40 orbits) HST/STIS observations of the BALQSO PG 0946+301 and make them available to the community. These observations are the major part of a multi-wavelength campaign on this object aimed at determining the ionization equilibrium and abundances (IEA) in broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs. We present simple template fits to the entire data set, which yield firm identifications for more than two dozen BALs from 18 ions and give lower limits for the ionic column densities. We find that the outflow's metalicity is consistent with being solar, while the abundance ratio of phosphorus to other metals is at least ten times solar. These findings are based on diagnostics that are not sensitive to saturation and partial covering effects in the BALs, which considerably weakened previous claims for enhanced metalicity. Ample evidence for these effects is seen in the spectrum. We also discuss several options for extracting tighter IEA constraints in future analyses, and present the significant temporal changes which are detected between these spectra and those taken by the HST/FOS in 1992.
  • This study explores the space density and properties of active galaxies to z=0.8. We have investigated the frequency and nature of unresolved nuclei in galaxies at moderate redshift as indicators of nuclear activity such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) or starbursts. Candidates are selected by fitting imaged galaxies with multi-component models using maximum likelihood estimate techniques to determine the best model fit. We select those galaxies requiring an unresolved, point source component in the galaxy nucleus, in addition to a disk and/or bulge component, to adequately model the galaxy light. We have searched 70 WFPC2 images primarily from the Medium Deep Survey for galaxies containing compact nuclei. In our survey of 1033 galaxies, the fraction containing an unresolved nuclear component greater than 3% of the total galaxy light is 16+/-3% corrected for incompleteness and 9+/-1% for nuclei greater than 5% of the galaxy light. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for 35 of our AGN/starburst candidates and photometric redshifts are estimated to an accuracy of sigma_z=0.1 for the remaining sample. In this paper, the first of two in this series, we present the selected HST imaged galaxies having unresolved nuclei and discuss the selection procedure. We also present the ground-based spectroscopy for these galaxies as well as the photometric redshifts estimated for those galaxies without spectra.
  • This study explores the space density and properties of active galaxies to z=0.8. We have investigated the frequency and nature of unresolved nuclei in galaxies at moderate redshift as indicators of nuclear activity such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) or starbursts. Candidates are selected by fitting imaged galaxies with multi-component models using maximum likelihood estimate techniques to determine the best model fit. We select those galaxies requiring an unresolved point-source component in the galaxy nucleus, in addition to a disk and/or bulge component, to adequately model the galaxy light. We have searched 70 WFPC2 images primarily from the Medium Deep Survey for galaxies containing compact nuclei. In our survey of 1033 galaxies, the fraction containing an unresolved nuclear component greater than 5% of the total galaxy light is 9+/-1% corrected for incompleteness. In this second of two papers in this series, we discuss the nature of the compact nuclei and their hosts. We present the upper limit luminosity function (LF) for low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) in two redshift bins to z=0.8. Mild number density evolution is detected for nuclei at -18 < M_B < -14. The LFs appear to flatten at M_B > -16 and this flatness, combined with the increase in number density, is inconsistent with pure luminosity evolution. Based on the amount of density evolution observed for these objects, we find that almost all present-day spiral galaxies could have hosted a LLAGN at some point in their lives. We also comment on the likely contribution of these compact nuclei to the soft X-ray background.
  • We have analyzed the broad absorption line system of the bright (V=16.5) high-redshift (z=2.361) QSO SBS1542+541 using UV spectra from the HST FOS along with optical data from the MMT and the Steward Observatory 2.3m telescope. These spectra give continuous wavelength coverage from 1200 to 8000 Angstroms, corresponding to 340 to 2480 Angstroms in the QSO rest frame. This object therefore offers a rare opportunity to study broad absorption lines in the rest-frame extreme UV. We find that the absorption system is dominated by very high-ionization species, including O VI, NeVIII, and SiXII. We also identify apparently saturated broad Lyman-series lines of order Ly-gamma and higher. There is strong evidence for partial occultation of the QSO emission source, particularly from the higher-order Lyman lines which indicate a covered fraction less than 0.2. Overall, the data suggest a correlation between a larger covered fraction and a higher state of ionization. We suggest that the different covered fractions can be explained by either a special line of sight through a disk-like geometry or by the existence of density fluctuations of a factor >2 in the BAL gas. Our photoionization models of the system indicate a large column density and high ionization state similar to that found in X-ray ``warm absorbers''.
  • We make available in electronic form the stellar catalog of 19,494 objects from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS). The DMS is based on CCD imaging with the Mayall 4-m telescope in U,B,V,R',I75,I86 and covers 0.83 sq. deg. in six fields at high galactic latitude. The survey reached 5 sigma limiting magnitudes of 22.1 in I86 to 23.8 in B. The catalog gives positions, magnitudes and error estimates, and classification codes in the six filter bands for all the objects. We present tables that summarize the spectroscopic results for the 55 quasars, 44 compact narrow emission-line galaxies, and 135 stars in the DMS that we have confirmed to date. We also make available illustrations of all the spectra. The catalog and spectra can be obtained from the World Wide Web at http://www.astronomy.ohio-state.edu/~posmer/DMS/.
  • A method of obtaining approximate redshifts and spectral types of galaxies using a photometric system of six broad-bandpass filters is developed. The technique utilizes a smallest maximum difference approach rather than a least-squares approach, and does not consider a galaxy's apparent magnitude in the determination of its redshift. In an evalution of its accuracy using two distinct galaxy samples, the photometric redshifts are found to have a root mean square deviation of $\pm$0.05 from spectroscopically determined redshifts. Possible systematic errors of the method are investigated, including the effects of post-starburst (``E+A'') galaxies and attempts to measure redshifts with incomplete color information. Applications of the technique are discussed.
  • A complete sample of 659 field galaxies with 17.0$<$U$\leq$21.1, each with U-B-V-R-I7500-I8600 photometry, has been selected from a deep field survey which covers 0.83 deg$^2$ along six lines of sight (Hall et al. 1996a). Each galaxy's spectral type and redshift has been estimated using a multicolor photometric technique (Liu & Green 1998). Total number counts of the galaxies in the U-band give a count slope d(logN)/dM = 0.55 $\pm$ 0.05, consistent with previous studies. The 545 galaxies in the sample classified as spectral type Sbc or bluer are analyzed for signs of evolution with redshift, and for unusual star formation histories. The U-band luminosity function of these blue galaxies at 0.02$<$z$<$0.15 has a steep $\alpha$ $\simeq$ -1.85 down to M(B)$\simeq$-14. The luminosity functions at 0.15$\leq$z$<$0.3 and 0.3$\leq$z$\leq$0.5 show significant evolution in M* and $\phi*$, at levels consistent with those found in the Canada-France and Autofib Redshift Surveys. A significant population of very blue (rest frame U-B$<$-0.35) galaxies, with spectral energy distributions indicating strong starburst activity, is observed at z$\gtrsim$0.3 but not at z$<$0.3. This population is confirmed via spectroscopy of part of the sample. These may be galaxies temporarily brightened by global starbursts, which subsequently fade and redden at lower redshifts.
  • We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614, astro-ph/9512052). We have identified 9 new quasars with 0.3 < z < 2.8 and 16.8 < B < 21.6, all from the group of candidates with ultraviolet excess (UVX). No new quasars with z > 3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B-R) and (V-R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3 < z < 2, nine with 2 < z < 3, three with 3 < z < 4, and 1 at z = 4.3. One new quasar, DMS 0059-0055, is very bright with B=16.8 and z=0.3, making its detection by our survey very unexpected. Including this new spectroscopy, the results of the DMS are converging with the predicted space densities of other surveys. In particular, we no longer find an excess of quasars with z < 2.3 and B < 21 in the survey over predictions based on models by Koo & Kron. Also, the excess in the number of quasars seen at z > 3 over predictions based on models by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.
  • I Zw 1 is the prototype narrow line quasar. We report here the results of our study of the UV emission of I Zw 1 using a high S/N (50-120) spectrum obtained with the HST FOS. The following main new results are obtained: 1. The Mg II and Al III doublets are partially/fully resolved. The measured doublet ratios verify theoretical predictions that the lines are thermalized in the BLR. 2. A weak associated UV absorption system is detected in N~V, and possibly also in C IV and Lya, suggesting an outflow with a velocity of 1870 km/s and velocity dispersion <300 km/s. 3. Lines from ions of increasing ionization level show increasing excess blue wing flux, and an increasing line peak velocity shift, reaching a maximum blueshift of about 2000 km/s for He II 1640. This may indicate an out-flowing component in the BLR, where the ionization level increases with velocity, and which is visible only in the approaching direction. The highest velocity part of this outflow may produce the associated UV absorption system. 4. The small C III] 1909 EW, and the small C III] 1909/Lya and C III] 1909/Si III] 1892 flux ratios indicate a typical BLR density of 10^11, i.e. about an order of magnitude larger than implied by C III] 1909 in most quasars. A BLR component of a higher density is implied by the EW and doublet ratio of the Al III 1857 doublet. 5. Prominent Fe II UV 191 emission is seen, together with weaker line emission at 1294 and 1871 A. These three features have been proposed as evidence for significant Lya pumping of the 8-10 eV levels of Fe II. 6. Significant Fe III emission is present. The Fe III UV 34 and UV 48 multiplets are clearly resolved, and Fe III UV 1, UV 47, UV 50, and UV 68 may also be present. (Shortened version)
  • I Zw 1 is a well known narrow line quasar with very strong Fe II emission. High S/N spectra obtained with the HST FOS show a remarkably rich emission line spectrum. The C III$^* \lambda 1176$ line is clearly detected in emission for the first time in AGNs. This line arises from radiative decay to the $2s2p^3P^o_{0,1,2}$ metastable levels of C III. The observed flux is 50 larger than expected from collisional excitation, or dielectronic recombination, in photoionized gas. The most plausible mechanism for the large enhancement in the C III^* \lambda 1176 flux is resonance scattering of continuum photons by C III^* ions. This mechanism requires large velocity gradients 1000 km/s within each emitting cloud in the BLR. Such large velocity gradients can be induced by forces external to the gas in the BLR clouds, such as tidal disruption, or radiation pressure.
  • We have used the KPNO 4-meter Mayall telescope to image 0.83 square degrees of sky in six fields at high galactic latitude in six filters spanning 3000-10000\AA\ to magnitude limits ranging from 22.1 to 23.8. We have assembled a catalog of 21,375 stellar objects detected in the fields for use primarily in conducting a multicolor search for quasars. This paper describes the data reduction techniques used on the CCD data, the methods used to construct the stellar object catalog, and the simulations performed to understand its completeness and contamination.
  • We have used the KPNO 4-meter Mayall telescope to image 0.83 square degrees of sky in six fields at high galactic latitude in six filters spanning 3000-10000\AA\ to magnitude limits ranging from 22.1 to 23.8. As a first use of this database, we have conducted a multicolor survey for quasars. We discuss various methods of selecting outliers in different color-color diagrams and multicolor space that have been used to identify quasars at all redshifts from their colors alone. We discuss the initial results of our program of spectroscopic identification which has so far resulted in the identification of over forty faint quasars, including one at z$>$4, a similar number of compact narrow-emission-line galaxies, and a number of unusual and potentially interesting stars. We use these spectroscopic results, along with extensive simulations of quasar spectra, to study the efficiency of our candidate selection procedures. Finally, we compare the number counts of our quasars and quasar candidates to the expected numbers based on previous studies of the quasar luminosity function. The agreement of our observations with these expectations is good in most cases. However, we do estimate that our survey contains more quasars with B$<$21 and z$<$2.3 than expected from the results of Koo \& Kron (1988) and more z$>$3 quasars than expected from the results of Warren, Hewett, \& Osmer (1994), both at the 3$\sigma$\ level. Additional spectroscopic observations will be required to confirm or refute these excesses.
  • We report the results of a search for X-ray emission from quasar host clusters at moderate redshift using the {\sl ROSAT} HRI. We detect no emission from the host clusters of 3C~263 (z=0.646) and PKS~2352-34 (z=0.706) to 3$\sigma$\ limits of 3.26 and 2.86 $\times$10$^{44}$\ ergs~s$^{-1}$ respectively (H$_o$=50, q$_o$=1/2) for clusters with r$_{core}$=125~kpc and T=5~keV. These limits show that these quasar host clusters are not substantially more X-ray luminous than optically or X-ray selected clusters of similar richnesses at z$\gtrsim$0.5. We also report the possible detection of a clump of X-ray emitting gas coincident with the brightest radio lobe of 3C~263. This may be evidence for the existence of a clumpy ICM in the host cluster of 3C~263.