• A collection of active photometric observations over the last half decade, archival data from the past 120 years, radial velocity observations from 1984, and recent monitoring through a pro-am collaboration reveal that the 9th magnitude F9 Ib supergiant HDE 344787 is a double-mode Cepheid variable of extremely small amplitude. It displays remarkably similar, but much more extreme, properties to the exotic Cepheid Polaris, including a rapidly-increasing period and sinusoidal light variations of decreasing amplitude suggesting that pulsational stability may occur as early as 2045. Unlike Polaris, HDE 344787 displays sinusoidal light variations at periods of both 5.4 and 3.8 days, corresponding to canonical fundamental mode and overtone pulsation. But it may be similar to Polaris in helping to define a small subgroup of Cepheids that display characteristics consistent with a first crossing of the instability strip. An update of 2010 observations of this remarkable star is presented.
  • The results of a coordinated space-based photometric and ground-based spectroscopic observing campaign on the enigmatic gamma-ray binary LS 5039 are reported. Sixteen days of observations from the MOST satellite have been combined with high-resolution optical echelle spectroscopy from the 2.3m ANU Telescope in Siding Spring, Australia. These observations were used to measure the orbital parameters of the binary and to study the properties of stellar wind from the O primary. We found that any broad-band optical photometric variability at the orbital period is below the 2 mmag level, supporting the scenario that the orbital eccentricity of the system is near the 0.24 +/- 0.08 value implied by our spectroscopy, which is lower than values previously obtained by other workers. The low amplitude optical variability also implies the component masses are at the higher end of estimates based on the primary's O6.5V((f)) spectral type with a primary mass of ~26 solar masses and a mass for the compact star of at least 1.8 solar masses. The mass loss rate from the O primary was determined to be 3.7E-7 to 4.8E-7 solar masses per year.
  • The high-mass X-ray binary RX J0146.9+6121, with optical counterpart LS I+61 235 (V831 Cas), is an intriguing system on the outskirts of the open cluster NGC 663. It contains the slowest X-ray pulsar known with a pulse period of around 1400s and, primarily from the study of variation in the emission line profile of H alpha, it is known to have a Be decretion disk with a one-armed density wave period of approximately 1240d. Here we present the results of an extensive photometric campaign, supplemented with optical spectroscopy, aimed at measuring short time-scale periodicities. We find three significant periodicities in the photometric data at, in order of statistical significance, 0.34d, 0.67d and 0.10d. We give arguments to support the interpretation that the 0.34d and 0.10d periods could be due to stellar oscillations of the B type primary star and that the 0.67d period is the spin period of the Be star with a spin axis inclination of 23 +10 -8 degrees. We measured a systemic velocity of -37.0 +- 4.3 km/s confirming that LS I+61 235 has a high probability of membership in the young cluster NGC 663 from which the system's age can be estimated as 20-25 Myr. From archival RXTE ASM data we further find "super" X-ray outbursts roughly every 450d. If these super outbursts are caused by the alignment of the compact star with the one-armed decretion disk enhancement, then the orbital period is approximately 330d.
  • This is a call for amateur astronomers who have the equipment and experience for producing high quality photometry to contribute to a program of finding periods in the optical light curves of high mass X-ray binaries (HMXB). HMXBs are binary stars in which the lighter star is a neutron star or a black hole and the more massive star is an O type supergiant or a Be type main sequence star. Matter is transferred from the ordinary star to the compact object and X-rays are produced as the the gravitational energy of the accreting gas is converted into light. HMXBs are very bright, many are brighter than 10th magnitude, and so make perfect targets for experienced amateur astronomers with photometry capable CCD equipment coupled with almost any size telescope.