• The Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 was monitored spectroscopically with the Hubble Space Telescope as part of a reverberation mapping campaign that also included Swift, Kepler and ground-based photometric monitoring. During 2016 July 12 - August 6, we obtained 26 spectra across a nearly continuous wavelength range of ~1150 - 10,000A. These were combined with Swift data to produce a UV/optical "lag spectrum", which shows the interband lag relative to the Swift UVW2 band as a function of wavelength. The broad shape of the lag spectrum appears to follow the $\tau \propto \lambda^{4/3}$ relation seen previously in photometric interband lag measurements of other active galactic nuclei (AGN). This shape is consistent with the standard thin disk model but the magnitude of the lags implies a disk that is a factor of ~3 larger than predicted, again consistent with what has been previously seen in other AGN. In all cases these large disk sizes, which are also implied by independent gravitational microlensing of higher-mass AGN, cannot be simply reconciled with the standard model. However the most striking feature in this higher resolution lag spectrum is a clear excess around the 3646A Balmer jump. This strongly suggests that diffuse emission from gas in the much larger broad-line region (BLR) must also contribute significantly to the interband lags. While the relative contributions of the disk and BLR cannot be uniquely determined in these initial measurements, it is clear that both will need to be considered in comprehensively modeling and understanding AGN lag spectra.
  • We report the discovery of 2 new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven H-alpha emitters were discovered using the H-alpha imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three H-alpha emitters were confirmed as Be stars with H-alpha equivalent widths > -10 Angstrom. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph SED-Machine on the Palomar 60 inch Telescope. The SED-Machine results show strong H-alpha emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-Machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.
  • We introduce the first phase of the Kepler-Swift Active Galaxies and Stars survey (KSwAGS), a simultaneous X-ray and UV survey of ~6 square degrees of the Kepler field using the Swift XRT and UVOT. We detect 93 unique X-ray sources with S/N>3 with the XRT, of which 60 have observed UV counterparts. We use the Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) to obtain the optical counterparts of these sources, and construct the X-ray to optical flux ratio as a first approximation of the classification of the source. The survey produces a mixture of stellar sources, extragalactic sources, and sources which we are not able to classify with certainty. We have obtained optical spectra for thirty of these targets, and are conducting an ongoing observing campaign to fully identify the sample. For sources classified as stellar or AGN with certainty, we construct SEDs using the 2MASS, UBV and GALEX data supplied for their optical counterparts by the KIC, and show that the SEDs differ qualitatively between the source types, and so can offer a method of classification in absence of a spectrum. Future papers in this series will analyze the timing properties of the stars and AGN in our sample separately. Our survey provides the first X-ray and UV data for a number of known variable stellar sources, as well as a large number of new X-ray detections in this well-studied portion of the sky. The KSwAGS survey is currently ongoing in the K2 ecliptic plane fields.
  • We present time series analyses of the full Kepler dataset of Zw 229-15. This Kepler light curve --- with a baseline greater than three years, composed of virtually continuous, evenly sampled 30-minute measurements --- is unprecedented in its quality and precision. We utilize two methods of power spectral analysis to investigate the optical variability and search for evidence of a bend frequency associated with a characteristic optical variability timescale. Each method yields similar results. The first interpolates across data gaps to use the standard Fourier periodogram. The second, using the CARMA-based time-domain modeling technique of Kelly et al. (2014), does not need evenly-sampled data. Both methods find excess power at high frequencies that may be due to Kepler instrumental effects. More importantly both also show strong bends ({\Delta}{\alpha} ~ 2) at timescales of ~5 days, a feature similar to those seen in the X-ray PSDs of AGN but never before in the optical. This observed ~5 day timescale may be associated with one of several physical processes potentially responsible for the variability. A plausible association could be made with light-crossing, dynamical or thermal timescales, depending on the assumed value of the accretion disk size and on unobserved disk parameters such as {\alpha} and H/R. This timescale is not consistent with the viscous timescale, which would be years in a ~10^7 Solar mass AGN such as Zw 229-15. However there must be a second bend on long (>~1 year) timescales, and that feature could be associated with the viscous timescale.
  • KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • We have developed the "S_IX" statistic to identify bright, highly-likely Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) candidates solely on the basis of WISE, 2MASS and Rosat all-sky survey data. This statistic was optimized with data from the preliminary WISE survey and the SDSS, and tested with Lick 3-m Kast spectroscopy. We find that sources with S_IX < 0 have a <~95% likelihood of being an AGN (defined in this paper as a Seyfert 1, quasar or blazar). This statistic was then applied to the full WISE/2MASS/RASS dataset, including the final WISE data release, to yield the "W2R" sample of 4,316 sources with S_IX < 0. Only 2,209 of these sources are currently in the Veron-Cetty and Veron (VCV) catalog of spectroscopically confirmed AGN, indicating that the W2R sample contains nearly 2,000 new, relatively bright (J <~ 16) AGN. We utilize the W2R sample to quantify biases and incompleteness in the VCV catalog. We find it is highly complete for bright (J < 14), northern AGN, but the completeness drops below 50% for fainter, southern samples and for sources near the Galactic plane. This approach also led to the spectroscopic identification of 10 new AGN in the Kepler field, more than doubling the number of AGN being monitored by Kepler. This has identified ~1 bright AGN every 10 square degrees, permitting construction of AGN samples in any sufficiently large region of sky.
  • Over three quarters in 2010-2011, Kepler monitored optical emission from four active galactic nuclei (AGN) with ~30 min sampling, >90% duty cycle, and <~0.1% repeatability. These data determined the AGN optical fluctuation power spectral density functions (PSDs) over a wide range in temporal frequency. Fits to these PSDs yielded power law slopes of -2.6 to -3.3, much steeper than typically seen in the X-rays. We find evidence that individual AGN exhibit intrinsically different PSD slopes. The steep PSD fits are a challenge to recent AGN variability models but seem consistent with first order MRI theoretical calculations of accretion disk fluctuations.
  • We present optical broadband (B and R) observations of the Seyfert 1 nucleus NGC 3516, obtained at Wise Observatory from March 1997 to March 2002, contemporaneously with X-ray 2-10 keV measurements with RXTE. With these data we increase the temporal baseline of this dataset to 5 years, more than triple to the coverage we have previously presented for this object. Analysis of the new data does not confirm the 100-day lag of X-ray behind optical variations, tentatively reported in our previous work. Indeed, excluding the first year's data, which drive the previous result, there is no significant correlation at any lag between the X-ray and optical bands. We also find no correlation at any lag between optical flux and various X-ray hardness ratios. We conclude that the close relation observed between the bands during the first year of our program was either a fluke, or perhaps the result of the exceptionally bright state of NGC 3516 in 1997, to which it has yet to return. Reviewing the results of published joint X-ray and UV/optical Seyfert monitoring programs, we speculate that there are at least two components or mechanisms contributing to the X-ray continuum emission up to 10 keV: a soft component that is correlated with UV/optical variations on timescales >1 day, and whose presence can be detected when the source is observed at low enough energies (about 1 keV), is unabsorbed, or is in a sufficiently bright phase; and a hard component whose variations are uncorrelated with the UV/optical.
  • The bright, soft X-ray spectrum Seyfert 1 galaxies Ark 564 and Ton S180 were monitored for 35 days and 12 days with ASCA and RXTE (and EUVE for Ton S180). The short time scale (hours-days) variability patterns were very similar across energy bands, with no evidence of lags between any of the energy bands studied. The fractional variability amplitude was almost independent of energy band. It is difficult to simultaneously explain soft Seyferts stronger variability, softer spectra, and weaker energy-dependence of the variability relative to hard Seyferts. The soft and hard band light curves diverged on the longest time scales probed, consistent with the fluctuation power density spectra that showed relatively greater power on long time scales in the softest bands. The simplest explanation is that a relatively hard, rapidly-variable component dominates the total X-ray spectrum and a slowly-variable soft excess is present in the lowest energy channels of ASCA. Although it would be natural to identify the latter with an accretion disk and the former with a corona surrounding it, a standard thin disk could not get hot enough to radiate significantly in the ASCA band, and the observed variability time scales are much too short. The hard component may have a more complex shape than a pure power-law. The most rapid factor of 2 flares and dips occurred within ~1000 sec in Ark 564 and a bit more slowly in Ton S180. The speed of the luminosity changes rules out viscous or thermal processes and limits the size of the individual emission regions to <~15 Schwarzschild radii (and probably much less), that is, to either the inner disk or small regions in a corona.
  • The bright, strongly variable BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 was observed by XMM for two essentially uninterrupted periods of ~11 and 16 hr on 30-31 May 2000. The strongest variations occurred in the highest energy bands. After scaling for this effect, the three softest bands (0.1-1.7 keV) showed strong correlation with no measurable lag to reliable limits of $\tau \ls 0.3$ hr. However, the hardest band (~3 keV) was less well-correlated with the other three, especially on short time scales, showing deviations of ~10-20% in ~1 hr although, again, no significant interband lag was detected. This result and examination of previous ASCA and BeppoSAX cross-correlation functions suggest that previous claims of soft lags on time scales of 0.3-4 hr could well be an artifact of periodic interruptions due to Earth-occultation every 1.6 hr. Previous determinations of the magnetic field/bulk Lorentz factor were therefore premature, as these data provide only a lower limit of $B \gamma^{1/3} \gs 2.5$ G. The hardest band encompasses the spectral region above the high-energy break; its enhanced variability could be indicating that the break energy of the synchrotron spectrum, and therefore of the underlying electron energy distribution, changes independently of the lower energies.
  • During 1998 April 13-16, NGC 3516 was monitored almost continuously with HST for 10.3 hr in the UV and 2.8 d in the optical, and simultaneous RXTE and ASCA monitoring covered the same period. The X-rays were strongly variable with the soft (0.5-2 keV) showing stronger variations (~65% peak-to-peak) than the hard (2-10 keV; ~50% peak-to-peak). The optical continuum showed much smaller but highly significant variations: a slow ~2.5% rise followed by a faster ~3.5% decline. The short UV observation did not show significant variability. The soft and hard X-ray light curves were strongly correlated with no significant lag. Likewise, the optical continuum bands (3590 and 5510 A) were also strongly correlated with no measurable lag above limits of <0.15 d. However no significant correlation or simple relationship could be found for the optical and X-ray light curves. These results appear difficult to reconcile with previous reports of correlations between X-ray and optical variations and of measurable lags within the optical band for some other Seyfert 1s. These results also present serious problems for "reprocessing" models in which the X-ray source heats a stratified accretion disk which then reemits in the optical/ultraviolet: the synchronous variations within the optical would suggest that the emitting region is <0.3 lt-d across, while the lack of correlation between X-ray and optical variations would indicate, in the context of this model, that any reprocessing region must be >1 lt-d in size. It may be possible to resolve this conflict by invoking anisotropic emission or special geometry, but the most natural explanation appears to be that the bulk of the optical luminosity is generated by some other mechanism than reprocessing.
  • During 1997 March-July, XTE observed the bright, strongly variable Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 once every ~12.8 hr for 4.5 months and nearly continuously (with interruptions due to SAA passage but not Earth occultation) for a 4.2 day period in the middle. These were followed by ongoing monitoring once every ~4.3 days. These data are used to construct the first well-determined X-ray fluctuation power density spectrum (PDS) of an active galaxy to span more than 4 decades of usable temporal frequency. The PDS shows no signs of any strict or quasi-periodicity, but does show a progressive flattening of the power-law slope from -1.74 at short time scales to -0.73 at longer time scales. This is the clearest observation to date of the long-predicted cutoff in the PDS. The characteristic variability time scale corresponding to this cutoff temporal frequency is 1 month. Although it is unclear how this time scale may be interpreted in terms of a physical size or process, there are several promising candidate models. The PDS appears similar to those seen for Galactic black hole candidates such as Cyg X-1, suggesting that these two classes of objects with very different luminosities and putative black hole masses (differing by more than a factor of 10^5) may have similar X-ray generation processes and structures.