• Dwarf galaxies are known to have remarkably low star formation efficiency due to strong feedback. Adopting the dwarf galaxies of the Milky Way as a laboratory, we explore a flexible semi-analytic galaxy formation model to understand how the feedback processes shape the satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Using Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo, we exhaustively search a large parameter space of the model and rigorously show that the general wisdom of strong outflows as the primary feedback mechanism cannot simultaneously explain the stellar mass function and the mass--metallicity relation of the Milky Way satellites. An extended model that assumes that a fraction of baryons is prevented from collapsing into low-mass halos in the first place can be accurately constrained to simultaneously reproduce those observations. The inference suggests that two different physical mechanisms are needed to explain the two different data sets. In particular, moderate outflows with weak halo mass dependence are needed to explain the mass--metallicity relation, and prevention of baryons falling into shallow gravitational potentials of low-mass halos (e.g. "pre-heating") is needed to explain the low stellar mass fraction for a given subhalo mass.
  • Empirical models of galaxy formation require assumptions about the correlations between galaxy and halo properties. These may be calibrated against observations or inferred from physical models such as hydrodynamical simulations. In this Letter, we use the EAGLE simulation to investigate the correlation of galaxy size with halo properties. We motivate this analysis by noting that the common assumption of angular momentum partition between baryons and dark matter in rotationally supported galaxies overpredicts both the spread in the stellar mass-size relation and the anticorrelation of size and velocity residuals, indicating a problem with the galaxy-halo connection it implies. We find the EAGLE galaxy population to perform significantly better on both statistics, and trace this success to the weakness of the correlations of galaxy size with halo mass, concentration and spin at fixed stellar mass. Using these correlations in empirical models will enable fine-grained aspects of galaxy scalings to be matched.
  • We present cosmological constraints from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) using a combined analysis of angular clustering of red galaxies and their cross-correlation with weak gravitational lensing of background galaxies. We use a 139 square degree contiguous patch of DES data from the Science Verification (SV) period of observations. Using large scale measurements, we constrain the matter density of the Universe as Omega_m = 0.31 +/- 0.09 and the clustering amplitude of the matter power spectrum as sigma_8 = 0.74 +/- 0.13 after marginalizing over seven nuisance parameters and three additional cosmological parameters. This translates into S_8 = sigma_8(Omega_m/0.3)^{0.16} = 0.74 +/- 0.12 for our fiducial lens redshift bin at 0.35 <z< 0.5, while S_8 = 0.78 +/- 0.09 using two bins over the range 0.2 <z< 0.5. We study the robustness of the results under changes in the data vectors, modelling and systematics treatment, including photometric redshift and shear calibration uncertainties, and find consistency in the derived cosmological parameters. We show that our results are consistent with previous cosmological analyses from DES and other data sets and conclude with a joint analysis of DES angular clustering and galaxy-galaxy lensing with Planck CMB data, Baryon Accoustic Oscillations and Supernova type Ia measurements.
  • The available probes of the large scale structure in the Universe have distinct properties: galaxies are a high resolution but biased tracer of mass, while weak lensing avoids such biases but, due to low signal-to-noise ratio, has poor resolution. We investigate reconstructing the projected density field using the complementarity of weak lensing and galaxy positions. We propose a maximum-probability reconstruction of the 2D lensing convergence with a likelihood term for shear data and a prior on the Fourier phases constructed from the galaxy positions. By considering only the phases of the galaxy field, we evade the unknown value of the bias and allow it to be calibrated by lensing on a mode-by-mode basis. By applying this method to a realistic simulated galaxy shear catalogue, we find that a weak prior on phases provides a good quality reconstruction down to scales beyond l=1000, far into the noise domain of the lensing signal alone.
  • Weak-lensing measurements of the averaged shear profiles of galaxy clusters binned by some proxy for cluster mass are commonly converted to cluster mass estimates under the assumption that these cluster stacks have spherical symmetry. In this paper we test whether this assumption holds for optically selected clusters binned by estimated optical richness. Using mock catalogues created from N-body simulations populated realistically with galaxies, we ran a suite of optical cluster finders and estimated their optical richness. We binned galaxy clusters by true cluster mass and estimated optical richness and measure the ellipticity of these stacks. We find that the processes of optical cluster selection and richness estimation are biased, leading to stacked structures that are elongated along the line-of-sight. We show that weak-lensing alone cannot measure the size of this orientation bias. Weak lensing masses of stacked optically selected clusters are overestimated by up to 3-6 per cent when clusters can be uniquely associated with haloes. This effect is large enough to lead to significant biases in the cosmological parameters derived from large surveys like the Dark Energy Survey, if not calibrated via simulations or fitted simultaneously. This bias probably also contributes to the observed discrepancy between the observed and predicted Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal of optically-selected clusters.
  • Comparing galaxies across redshifts at fixed cumulative number density is a popular way to estimate the evolution of specific galaxy populations. This method ignores scatter in mass accretion histories and galaxy-galaxy mergers, which can lead to errors when comparing galaxies over large redshift ranges (Delta z > 1). We use abundance matching in the LCDM paradigm to estimate the median change in number density with redshift and provide a simple fit (+0.16 dex per unit Delta z) for progenitors of z = 0 galaxies. We find that galaxy descendants do not evolve in the same way as galaxy progenitors, largely due to scatter in mass accretion histories. We also provide estimates for the 1-sigma range of number densities corresponding to galaxy progenitors and descendants. Finally, we discuss some limits on number density comparisons, which arise due to difficulties measuring physical quantities (e.g., stellar mass) consistently across redshifts. A public tool to calculate number density evolution for galaxies, as well as approximate halo masses, is available online.
  • We use measurements of the stellar mass function, galaxy clustering, and galaxy-galaxy lensing within the COSMOS survey to constrain the stellar-to-halo mass relation (SHMR) of star forming and quiescent galaxies over the redshift range z=[0.2,1.0]. For massive galaxies, M*>~10^10.6 Msol, our results indicate that star-forming galaxies grow proportionately as fast as their dark matter halos while quiescent galaxies are outpaced by dark matter growth. At lower masses, there is minimal difference in the SHMRs, implying that the majority low-mass quiescent galaxies have only recently been quenched of their star formation. Our analysis also affords a breakdown of all COSMOS galaxies into the relative numbers of central and satellite galaxies for both populations. At z=1, satellite galaxies dominate the red sequence below the knee in the stellar mass function. But the number of quiescent satellites exhibits minimal redshift evolution; all evolution in the red sequence is due to low-mass central galaxies being quenched of their star formation. At M*~10^10 Msol, the fraction of central galaxies on the red sequence increases by a factor of ten over our redshift baseline, while the fraction of quenched satellite galaxies at that mass is constant with redshift. We define a "migration rate" to the red sequence as the time derivative of the passive galaxy abundances. We find that the migration rate of central galaxies to the red sequence increases by nearly an order of magnitude from z=1 to z=0. These results imply that the efficiency of quenching star formation for centrals is increasing with cosmic time, while the mechanisms that quench the star formation of satellite galaxies in groups and clusters is losing efficiency.
  • Many approaches to obtaining cosmological constraints rely on the connection between galaxies and dark matter. However, the distribution of galaxies is dependent on their formation and evolution as well as the cosmological model, and galaxy formation is still not a well-constrained process. Thus, methods that probe cosmology using galaxies as a tracer for dark matter must be able to accurately estimate the cosmological parameters without knowing the details of galaxy formation a priori. We apply this reasoning to the method of obtaining $\Omega_m$ and $\sigma_8$ from galaxy clustering combined with the mass-to-number ratio of galaxy clusters. To test the sensitivity of this method to variations due to galaxy formation, we consider several different models applied to the same cosmological dark matter simulation. The cosmological parameters are then estimated using the observables in each model, marginalizing over the parameters of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD). We find that for models where the galaxies can be well represented by a parameterized HOD, this method can successfully extract the desired cosmological parameters for a wide range of galaxy formation prescriptions.
  • Maximizing the utility of upcoming photometric cluster surveys requires a thorough understanding of the richness-mass relation of galaxy clusters. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the impact of various sources of observational scatter on this relation. Cluster ellipticity, photometric errors, photometric redshift errors, and cluster-to-cluster variations in the properties of red-sequence galaxies contribute negligible noise. Miscentering, however, can be important, and likely contributes to the scatter in the richness-mass relation of galaxy maxBCG clusters at the low mass end, where centering is more difficult. We also investigate the impact of projection effects under several empirically motivated assumptions about cluster environments. Using SDSS data and the maxBCG cluster catalog, we demonstrate that variations in cluster environments can rarely (\approx 1% - 5% of the time) result in significant richness boosts. Due to the steepness of the mass/richness function, the corresponding fraction of optically selected clusters that suffer from these projection effects is \approx 5% - 15%. We expect these numbers to be generic in magnitude, but a precise determination requires detailed, survey-specific modeling.
  • We present a new non-parametric method for determining mean 3D density and mass profiles from weak lensing measurements around stacked samples of galaxies or clusters, that is, from measurement of the galaxy-shear or cluster-shear correlation functions. Since the correlation function is statistically isotropic, this method evades problems, such as projection of large-scale structure along the line of sight or halo asphericity, that complicate attempts to infer masses from weak lensing measurements of individual objects. We demonstrate the utility of this method in measuring halo profiles, galaxy-mass and cluster-mass cross-correlation functions, and cluster virial masses. We test this method on an N-body simulation and show that it correctly and accurately recovers the 3D density and mass profiles of halos. We find no evidence of problems due to a mass sheet degeneracy in the simulation. Cross-correlation lensing provides a powerful method for calibrating the mass-observable relation for use in measurement of the cluster mass function in large surveys. It can also be used on large scales to measure and remove the halo bias and thereby provide a direct measurement of Omega_m * sigma_8.
  • We present the "C4 Cluster Catalog", a new sample of 748 clusters of galaxies identified in the spectroscopic sample of the Second Data Release (DR2) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The C4 cluster--finding algorithm identifies clusters as overdensities in a seven-dimensional position and color space, thus minimizing projection effects which plagued previous optical clusters selection. The present C4 catalog covers ~2600 square degrees of sky with groups containing 10 members to massive clusters having over 200 cluster members with redshifts. We provide cluster properties like sky location, mean redshift, galaxy membership, summed r--band optical luminosity (L_r), velocity dispersion, and measures of substructure. We use new mock galaxy catalogs to investigate the sensitivity to the various algorithm parameters, as well as to quantify purity and completeness. These mock catalogs indicate that the C4 catalog is ~90% complete and 95% pure above M_200 = 1x10^14 solar masses and within 0.03 <=z <= 0.12. The C4 algorithm finds 98% of X-ray identified clusters and 90% of Abell clusters within 0.03 <= z <= 0.12. We show that the L_r of a cluster is a more robust estimator of the halo mass (M_200) than the line-of-sight velocity dispersion or the richness of the cluster. L_r. The final SDSS data will provide ~2500 C4 clusters and will represent one of the largest and most homogeneous samples of local clusters.