• The submillimeter galaxy (SMG) HERMES J105751.1+573027 (hereafter HLock01) at z = 2.9574 +/- 0.0001 is one of the brightest gravitationally lensed sources discovered in the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey. Apart from the high flux densities in the far-infrared, it is also extremely bright in the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV), with a total apparent magnitude m_UV = 19.7 mag. We report here deep spectroscopic observations with the Gran Telescopio Canarias of the optically bright lensed images of HLock01. Our results suggest that HLock01 is a merger system composed of the Herschel-selected SMG and an optically bright Lyman break-like galaxy (LBG), separated by only 3.3 kpc in projection. While the SMG appears very massive (M* = 5x10^11 Msun), with a highly extinguished stellar component (A_V = 4.3), the LBG is a young, lower-mass (M* = 1x10^10 Msun), but still luminous (10xL*_UV) satellite galaxy. Detailed analysis of the high signal-to-noise (S/N) rest-frame UV spectrum of the LBG shows complex kinematics of the gas, exhibiting both blueshifted and redshifted absorption components. While the blueshifted component is associated with strong galactic outflows from the massive stars in the LBG, as is common in most star-forming galaxies, the redshifted component may be associated with gas inflow seen along a favorable sightline to the LBG. We also find evidence of an extended gas reservoir around HLock01 at an impact parameter of 110 kpc, through the detection of C II 1334$\AA$ absorption in the red wing of a bright Ly-alpha emitter at z = 3.327. The data presented here highlight the power of gravitational lensing in high S/N studies to probe deeply into the physics of high-z star forming galaxies.
  • We present the largest submillimeter images that have been made of the extragalactic sky. The Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) is a survey of 660 deg$^2$ with the PACS and SPIRE cameras in five photometric bands: 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500{\mu}m. In this paper we present the images from our two largest fields which account for ~75% of the survey. The first field is 180.1 deg$^2$ in size centered on the North Galactic Pole (NGP) and the second field is 317.6 deg$^2$ in size centered on the South Galactic Pole. The NGP field serendipitously contains the Coma cluster. Over most (~80%) of the images, the pixel noise, including both instrumental noise and confusion noise, is approximately 3.6, and 3.5 mJy/pix at 100 and 160{\mu}m, and 11.0, 11.1 and 12.3 mJy/beam at 250, 350 and 500{\mu}m, respectively, but reaches lower values in some parts of the images. If a matched filter is applied to optimize point-source detection, our total 1{\sigma} map sensitivity is 5.7, 6.0, and 7.3 mJy at 250, 350, and 500{\mu}m, respectively. We describe the results of an investigation of the noise properties of the images. We make the most precise estimate of confusion in SPIRE maps to date finding values of 3.12+/-0.07, 4.13+/-0.02 and 4.45+/-0.04 mJy/beam at 250, 350, and 500{\mu}m in our un-convolved maps. For PACS we find an estimate of the confusion noise in our fast-parallel observations of 4.23 and 4.62 mJy/beam at 100 and 160{\mu}m. Finally, we give recipes for using these images to carry out photometry, both for unresolved and extended sources.
  • The SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) is a three-year JCMT Large Program aiming at reaching the 450 $\mu$m confusion limit in the COSMOS-CANDELS region, to study a representative sample of the high-redshift far-infrared galaxy population that gives rise to the bulk of the far-infrared background. We present the first-year data from STUDIES. We have reached a 450 $\mu$m noise level of 0.91~mJy for point sources at the map center, covered an area of 151 arcmin$^2$, and detected 98 and 141 sources at 4.0 and 3.5 $\sigma$, respectively. Our derived counts are best constrained in the 3.5-25 mJy regime using directly detected sources. Below the detection limits, our fluctuation analysis further constrains the slope of the counts down to 1 mJy. The resulting counts at 1-25 mJy are consistent with a power law having a slope of $-2.59$ ($\pm0.10$ for 3.5-25 mJy, and $^{+0.4}_{-0.7}$ for 1-3.5 mJy). There is no evidence of a faint-end termination or turn-over of the counts in this flux density range. Our counts are also consistent with previous SCUBA-2 blank-field and lensing cluster surveys. The integrated surface brightness from our counts down to 1 mJy is $90.0\pm17.2$ Jy deg$^{-2}$, which can account for up to $83^{+15}_{-16}\%$ of the COBE 450 $\mu$m background. We show that Herschel counts at 350 and 500 $\mu$m are significantly higher than our 450 $\mu$m counts, likely caused by its large beam and source clustering. High-angular resolution instruments like SCUBA-2 at 450 $\mu$m are therefore highly beneficial for measuring the luminosity and spatial density of high-redshift dusty galaxies.
  • Debris discs are evidence of the ongoing destructive collisions between planetesimals, and their presence around stars also suggests that planets exist in these systems. In this paper, we present submillimetre images of the thermal emission from debris discs that formed the SCUBA-2 Observations of Nearby Stars (SONS) survey, one of seven legacy surveys undertaken on the James Clerk Maxwell telescope between 2012 and 2015. The overall results of the survey are presented in the form of 850 microns (and 450 microns, where possible) images and fluxes for the observed fields. Excess thermal emission, over that expected from the stellar photosphere, is detected around 49 stars out of the 100 observed fields. The discs are characterised in terms of their flux density, size (radial distribution of the dust) and derived dust properties from their spectral energy distributions. The results show discs over a range of sizes, typically 1-10 times the diameter of the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt in our Solar System. The mass of a disc, for particles up to a few millimetres in size, is uniquely obtainable with submillimetre observations and this quantity is presented as a function of the host stars' age, showing a tentative decline in mass with age. Having doubled the number of imaged discs at submillimetre wavelengths from ground-based, single dish telescope observations, one of the key legacy products from the SONS survey is to provide a comprehensive target list to observe at high angular resolution using submillimetre/millimetre interferometers (e.g., ALMA, SMA).
  • We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the SXDF using 1.6 {\mu}m and 3.6 {\mu}m selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ~0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to LIR < 10^11 Lsun and a star formation rate (SFR) of ~ 15 Msun/yr at z = 2. We find that galaxies brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to be also brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than m[3.6um] = 23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z ~ 2.5 H-alpha emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 +/- 1.2 Jy/deg, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys, Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.
  • Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass halos at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of five submillimeter sources (S_1.1mm = 0.54-2.02 mJy) that were detected during our 1.1-mm-deep continuum survey in the SXDF-UDS-CANDELS field (2 arcmin^2, 1sigma = 0.055 mJy beam^-1) using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The two brightest sources correspond to a known single-dish (AzTEC) selected bright submillimeter galaxy (SMG), whereas the remaining three are faint SMGs newly uncovered by ALMA. If we exclude the two brightest sources, the contribution of the ALMA-detected faint SMGs to the infrared extragalactic background light is estimated to be ~ 4.1^{+5.4}_{-3.0} Jy deg^{-2}, which corresponds to ~ 16^{+22}_{-12}% of the infrared extragalactic background light. This suggests that their contribution to the infrared extragalactic background light is as large as that of bright SMGs. We identified multi-wavelength counterparts of the five ALMA sources. One of the sources (SXDF-ALMA3) is extremely faint in the optical to near-infrared region despite its infrared luminosity (L_IR ~ 1e12 L_sun or SFR ~ 100 M_sun yr^{-1}). By fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) at the optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths of the remaining four ALMA sources, we obtained the photometric redshifts (z_photo) and stellar masses (M_*): z_photo ~ 1.3-2.5, M_* ~ (3.5-9.5)e10 M_sun. We also derived their star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (sSFRs) as ~ 30-200 M_sun yr^{-1} and ~ 0.8-2 Gyr^{-1}, respectively. These values imply that they are main-sequence star-forming galaxies.
  • We report 1.1 mm number counts revealed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field (SXDF). The advent of ALMA enables us to reveal millimeter-wavelength number counts down to the faint end without source confusion. However, previous studies are based on the ensemble of serendipitously-detected sources in fields originally targeting different sources and could be biased due to the clustering of sources around the targets. We derive number counts in the flux range of 0.2-2 mJy by using 23 (>=4sigma) sources detected in a continuous 2.0 arcmin$^2$ area of the SXDF. The number counts are consistent with previous results within errors, suggesting that the counts derived from serendipitously-detected sources are not significantly biased, although there could be field-to-field variation due to the small survey area. By using the best-fit function of the number counts, we find that ~40% of the extragalactic background light at 1.1 mm is resolved at S(1.1mm) > 0.2 mJy.
  • In this work we present IRAM-30m telescope observations of a sample of bulge-dominated galaxies with large dust lanes, which have had a recent minor merger. We find these galaxies are very gas rich, with H2 masses between 4x10^8 and 2x10^10 Msun. We use these molecular gas masses, combined with atomic gas masses from an accompanying paper, to calculate gas-to-dust and gas-to-stellar mass ratios. The gas-to-dust ratios of our sample objects vary widely (between ~50 and 750), suggesting many objects have low gas-phase metallicities, and thus that the gas has been accreted through a recent merger with a lower mass companion. We calculate the implied minor companion masses and gas fractions, finding a median predicted stellar mass ratio of ~40:1. The minor companion likely had masses between ~10^7 - 10^10 Msun. The implied merger mass ratios are consistent with the expectation for low redshift gas-rich mergers from simulations. We then go on to present evidence that (no matter which star-formation rate indicator is used) our sample objects have very low star-formation efficiencies (star-formation rate per unit gas mass), lower even than the early-type galaxies from ATLAS3D which already show a suppression. This suggests that minor mergers can actually suppress star-formation activity. We discuss mechanisms that could cause such a suppression, include dynamical effects induced by the minor merger.
  • We present the properties of the first 250 $\mu$m blind sample of nearby galaxies (15 < D < 46 Mpc) containing 42 objects from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). Herschel's sensitivity probes the faint end of the dust luminosity function for the first time, spanning a range of stellar mass (7.4 < log$_{10}$ M$_{\star}$ < 11.3 M$_{\odot}$), star formation activity (-11.8 < log$_{10}$ SSFR < -8.9 yr$^{-1}$), gas fraction (3-96 per cent), and colour (0.6 < FUV-Ks < 7.0 mag). The median cold dust temperature is 14.6 K, colder than in the Herschel Reference Survey (18.5 K) and Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue 17.7 K. The mean dust-to-stellar mass ratio in our sample is higher than these surveys by factors of 3.7 and 1.8, with a dust mass volume density of (3.7 $\pm$ 0.7) x 10$^{5}$ M$_{\odot}$ Mpc$^{-3}$. Counter-intuitively, we find that the more dust rich a galaxy, the lower its UV attenuation. Over half of our dust-selected sample are very blue in FUV-Ks colour, with irregular and/or highly flocculent morphology, these galaxies account for only 6 per cent of the sample's stellar mass but contain over 35 per cent of the dust mass. They are the most actively star forming galaxies in the sample, with the highest gas fractions and lowest UV attenuation. They also appear to be in an early stage of converting their gas into stars, providing valuable insights into the chemical evolution of young galaxies.
  • Interstellar dust in galaxies can be traced either through its extinction effects on the star light, or through its thermal emission at infrared wavelengths. Recent radiative transfer studies of several nearby edge-on galaxies have found an apparent inconsistency in the dust energy balance: the radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction underestimate the observed fluxes by an average factor of three. We investigate the dust energy balance for IC4225 and NGC5166, two edge-on spiral galaxies observed by the Herschel Space Observatory in the frame of the H-ATLAS survey. We start from models which were constrained from optical data and extend them to construct the entire spectral energy distribution of our galaxies. These predicted values are subsequently compared to the observed far-infrared fluxes. We find that including a young stellar population in the modelling is necessary as it plays a non-negligible part in the heating of the dust grains. While the modelling approach for both galaxies is nearly identical, we find two very different results. As is often seen in other edge-on spiral galaxies, the far-infrared emission of our radiative transfer model of IC4225 underestimates the observed fluxes by a factor of about three. For NGC5166 on the other hand, we find that both the predicted spectral energy distribution as well as the simulated images match the observations particularly well. We explore possible reasons for this difference and conclude that it is unlikely that one single mechanism is the cause of the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies. We discuss the different approaches that can be considered in order to get a conclusive answer on the origin this discrepancy.
  • We use deep panchromatic datasets in the GOODS-N field, from GALEX to the deepest Herschel far-infrared and VLA radio continuum imaging, to explore, using mass-complete samples, the evolution of the star formation activity and dust attenuation of star-forming galaxies to z~4. Our main results can be summarized as follows: i) the slope of the SFR-M correlation is consistent with being constant, and equal to ~0.8 at least up to z~1.5, while its normalization keeps increasing with redshift; ii) for the first time here we are able to explore the FIR-radio correlation for a mass-selected sample of star-forming galaxies: the correlation does not evolve up to z~4; iii) we confirm that galaxy stellar mass is a robust proxy for UV dust attenuation in star-forming galaxies, with more massive galaxies being more dust attenuated, strikingly we find that this attenuation relation evolves very weakly with redshift, the amount of dust attenuation increasing by less than 0.3 magnitudes over the redshift range [0.5-4] for a fixed stellar mass, as opposed to a tenfold increase of star formation rate; iv) the correlation between dust attenuation and the UV spectral slope evolves in redshift, with the median UV spectral slope of star-forming galaxies becoming bluer with redshift. By z~3, typical UV slopes are inconsistent, given the measured dust attenuation, with the predictions of commonly used empirical laws. Finally, building on existing results, we show that gas reddening is marginally larger (by a factor of around 1.3) than stellar reddening at all redshifts probed, and also that the amount of dust attenuation at a fixed ISM metallicity increases with redshift. We speculate that our results support evolving ISM conditions of typical star-forming galaxies such that at z~1.5 Main Sequence galaxies have ISM conditions getting closer to those of local starbursts.
  • Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic phenomena in the Universe; believed to result from the collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars. Even though it has profound consequences for our understanding of their nature and selection biases, little is known about the dust properties of the galaxies hosting GRBs. We present analysis of the far-infrared properties of an unbiased sample of 20 \textit{BeppoSAX} and \textit{Swift} GRB host galaxies (at an average redshift of $z\,=\,3.1$) located in the {\it Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, the {\it Herschel} Virgo Cluster Survey, the {\it Herschel} Fornax Cluster Survey, the {\it Herschel} Stripe 82 Survey and the {\it Herschel} Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, totalling $880$ deg$^2$, or $\sim 3$\% of the sky in total. Our sample selection is serendipitous, based only on whether the X-ray position of a GRB lies within a large-scale {\it Herschel} survey -- therefore our sample can be considered completely unbiased. Using deep data at wavelengths of 100\,--\,500$\,\mu$m, we tentatively detected 1 out of 20 GRB hosts located in these fields. We constrain their dust masses and star formation rates (SFRs), and discuss these in the context of recent measurements of submillimetre galaxies and ultraluminous infrared galaxies. The average far-infrared flux of our sample gives an upper limit on SFR of $<114\,{\rm M}\odot\,\mbox{yr}^{-1}$. The detection rate of GRB hosts is consistent with that predicted assuming that GRBs trace the cosmic SFR density in an unbiased way, i.e. that the fraction of GRB hosts with $\mbox{SFR}>500\,{\rm M}\odot\,\mbox{yr}^{-1}$ is consistent with the contribution of such luminous galaxies to the cosmic star formation density.
  • We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO). We target H-alpha emission of three SMGs at redshifts z~1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) on Keck. The spatially-resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad H-alpha line regions (FWHM>1000 km/s) likely associated with an AGN and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line H-alpha emission (FWHM<500 km/s) dominated by multiple Halpha-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1-30% of the total clump-integrated H-alpha emission. We find that these SMGs host high star-formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended H-alpha emission over 4-16 kpc. H-alpha kinematics show no evidence of ordered global motion as would be found in a disk, but rather large velocity offsets (~few x 100 km/s) between the distinct stellar clumps. Together with the asymmetric distribution of the stellar clumps around the AGN in these objects, it is unlikely that we are unveiling a clumpy disk structure as has been suggested in other high-redshift populations of star-forming galaxies. The SMG clumps in this sample may correspond to remnants of originally independent gas-rich systems that are in the process of merging, hence triggering the ultraluminous SMG phase.
  • We determine star formation rates (SFRs) in a sample of color-selected, star-forming (sBzK) galaxies (K(AB)<21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field - South. To identify and avoid active galactic nuclei, we use X-ray, IRAC color, and IR/radio flux ratio selection methods. Photometric redshift-binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Spitzer-MIPS IR, BLAST and APEX/LABOCA submillimeter, VLA and GMRT radio and Chandra X-ray data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio spectral energy distributions. We determine the total IR luminosities and compare SFR calibrations from FIR, 24 micron, UV, radio and X-ray wavebands. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR(IR+UV), to within errors for the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results imply that 24 micron only and X-ray SFR estimates should be applied to high redshift galaxies with caution. Average IR luminosities are consistent with luminous infrared galaxies. We find SFR(IR+UV) for our stacked sBzKs at median redshifts 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2 to be 55+/-6 (random error), 74+/-8 and 154+/-17 Msun yr^-1 respectively, with additional systematic uncertainty of a factor of ~2.
  • We describe the infrared properties of sources detected over ~36 deg^2 of sky in the GAMA 15-hr equatorial field, using data from both the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large-Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and Wide-field Infrared Survey (WISE). With 5-sigma point-source depths of 34 and 0.048 mJy at 250 micron and 3.4 micron, respectively, we are able to identify 50.6% of the H-ATLAS sources in the WISE survey, corresponding to a surface density of ~630 deg^{-2}. Approximately two-thirds of these sources have measured spectroscopic or optical/near-IR photometric redshifts of z<1. For sources with spectroscopic redshifts at z<0.3, we find a linear correlation between the infrared luminosity at 3.4 micron and that at 250 micron, with +-50% scatter over ~1.5 orders of magnitude in luminosity, ~10^9 - 10^{10.5} L_sun. By contrast, the matched sources without previously measured redshifts (r>~20.5) have 250-350 micron flux density ratios that suggest either high-redshift galaxies (z>~1.5) or optically faint low-redshift galaxies with unusually low temperatures (T<~20). Their small 3.4-250 micron flux ratios favor a high-redshift galaxy population, as only the most actively star-forming galaxies at low redshift (e.g., Arp 220) exhibit comparable flux density ratios. Furthermore, we find a relatively large AGN fraction (~30%) in a 12 micron flux-limited subsample of H-ATLAS sources, also consistent with there being a significant population of high-redshift sources in the no-redshift sample.
  • We present deep 1.2 mm continuum mapping of a 566 arcmin^2 area within the Lockman Hole North field, previously a target of the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey and extremely deep 20 cm mapping with the Very Large Array, which we have obtained using the Max-Planck millimeter bolometer (MAMBO) array on the IRAM 30 m telescope. After filtering, our full map has an RMS sensitivity ranging from 0.45 to 1.5 mJy/beam, with an average of 0.75 mJy/beam. Using the pixel flux distribution in a map made from our best data, we determine the shape, normalization, and approximate flux density cutoff for 1.2 mm number counts well below our nominal sensitivity and confusion limits. After validating our full dataset through comparison with this map, we successfully detect 41 1.2 mm sources with S/N > 4.0 and S(1.2 mm)\simeq 2-5 mJy. We use the most significant of these detections to directly determine the integral number counts down to 1.8 mJy, which are consistent with the results of the pixel flux distribution analysis. 93% of our 41 individual detections have 20 cm counterparts, 49% have Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron counterparts, and one may have a significant Chandra X-ray counterpart. We resolve \simeq 3% of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.2 mm into significant detections, and directly estimate a 0.05 mJy faint-end cutoff for the counts that is consistent with the full intensity of the 1.2 mm CIB. The median redshift of our 17 detections with spectroscopic or robust photometric redshifts is z(median)=2.3, and rises to z(median)=2.9 when we include redshifts estimated from the radio/far-infrared spectral index. By using a nearest neighbor and angular correlation function analysis, we find evidence that our S/N>4.0 detections are clustered at the 95% confidence level.
  • We present a joint analysis of the overlapping BLAST 250, 350, 500um, and LABOCA 870um observations (from the LESS survey) of the ECDF-S. Out to z~3, the BLAST filters sample near the peak wavelength of far-infrared (FIR) emission from galaxies (rest-frame wavelengths ~60--200um), primarily produced by dust heated through absorption in star-forming clouds. However, identifying counterparts to individual BLAST peaks is very challenging, given the large beams (FWHM 36--60"). In contrast, the 870um observations have a significantly smaller 19" FWHM beam, and are sensitive to higher redshifts (z~1--5, and potentially beyond) due to the more favourable negative K-correction. We use the LESS data, as well as deep Spitzer and VLA imaging, to identify 118 individual sources that produce significant emission in the BLAST bands. We characterize the temperatures and FIR luminosities for a subset of 69 sources which have well-measured submm SEDs and redshift measurements out to z~3. For flux-limited sub-samples in each BLAST band, and a dust emissivity index \beta=2.0, we find a median temperature T=30K (all bands) as well as median redshifts: z=1.1 (interquartile range 0.2--1.9) for S250 > 40mJy; z=1.3 (interquartile range 0.6--2.1) for S350 > 30mJy; and z=1.6 (interquartile range 1.3--2.3) for S500 > 20mJy. Taking into account selection effects for our survey (a bias toward detecting lower-temperature galaxies), we find no evidence for evolution in the local FIR-temperature correlation out to z~2.5. Comparing with star-forming galaxy SED templates, about 8% of our sample appears to exhibit significant excesses in the radio and/or mid-IR, consistent with those sources harbouring an AGN. We describe the following techniques in two appendices: our `matched filter' for identifying sources in the presence of point-source confusion; and our approach for identifying counterparts using likelihood ratios.
  • We present a study of the cosmic infrared background, which is a measure of the dust obscured activity in all galaxies in the Universe. We venture to isolate the galaxies responsible for the background at 1mm; with spectroscopic and photometric redshifts we constrain the redshift distribution of these galaxies. We create a deep 1.16mm map (sigma ~ 0.5mJy) by combining the AzTEC 1.1mm and MAMBO 1.2mm datasets in GOODS-N. This combined map contains 41 secure detections, 13 of which are new. By averaging the 1.16mm flux densities of individually undetected galaxies with 24um flux densities > 25uJy, we resolve 31--45 per cent of the 1.16mm background. Repeating our analysis on the SCUBA 850um map, we resolve a higher percentage (40--64 per cent) of the 850um background. A majority of the background resolved (attributed to individual galaxies) at both wavelengths comes from galaxies at z > 1.3. If the ratio of the resolved submillimeter to millimeter background is applied to a reasonable scenario for the origins of the unresolved submillimeter background, 60--88 per cent of the total 1.16mm background comes from galaxies at z > 1.3.
  • UV continuum and mid-IR emission constitute two widely used star formation indicators at intermediate and high redshifts. We study 2430 galaxies with z<1.4 in the Extended Groth Strip with MIPS 24 mic observations from FIDEL, spectroscopy from DEEP2, and UV, optical, and near-IR photometry from AEGIS. The data are coupled with stellar population models and Bayesian SED fitting to estimate dust-corrected SFRs. In order to probe the dust heating from stellar populations of various ages, the derived SFRs were averaged over various timescales--from 100 Myr for "current" SFR to 1--3 Gyr for long-timescale SFRs. These SED-based UV/optical SFRs are compared to total infrared luminosities extrapolated from 24 mic observations. We find that for the blue, actively star forming galaxies the correlation between the IR luminosity and the UV/optical SFR shows a decrease in scatter when going from shorter to longer SFR-averaging timescales. We interpret this as the greater role of intermediate age stellar populations in heating the dust than what is typically assumed. This holds over the entire redshift range. Many so-called green valley galaxies are simply dust-obscured actively star-forming galaxies. However, there exist 24 mic-detected galaxies, some with L>10^11 L_sun, yet with little current star formation. For them a reasonable amount of dust absorption of stellar light is sufficient to produce the observed levels of IR. In our sample optical and X-ray AGNs do not contribute on average more than ~50% to the mid-IR luminosity, and we see no evidence for a large population of "IR excess" galaxies (Abridged).
  • We used the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to study the mid-IR properties and investigate the energetics of 24 Submillimeter Galaxies (SMGs). This is the largest sample of SMGs observed with Spitzer IRS and covers the full extent of properties of the radio-identified population of SMGs in the redshift range of z ~ 0.65-3.2. We observe broad emission features from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in more than 80% of our sample. We find that the median mid-IR spectrum is well described by a starburst component with an additional power law, Fnu ~ nu^-2, likely representing a < 32% AGN contribution to the bolometric luminosity. Our results thus confirm that starburst activity dominates the bolometric luminosity in SMGs. We find that SMGs show weaker silicate absorption at 9.7um than local ULIRGs. We also find stronger 6.2um PAH emission in SMGs (relative to the 7.7um PAH feature) than in local nuclear starbursts, which may be attributed to lower extinction by ice along the line of sight to SMGs. This suggests that the continuum and PAH emitting regions of SMGs are less obscured than in local starbursts and similarly luminous low-redshift ULIRGs. We interpret these results as evidence for a more extended distribution of cool and warm dust in SMGs compared to the more compact emitting regions in local ULIRGs and starbursts. Together these results suggest that SMGs are not simple high-redshift analogs of local ULIRGs or nuclear starbursts, but instead they appear to have star formation which resembles that seen in less-extreme star-forming environments at z~0 -- suggesting their intense activity is distributed across a far larger region than the ~1-kpc nuclear bursts in local ULIRGs.
  • We have conducted sensitive (1 sigma<30 uJy) 1.4 GHz radio observations with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of a field largely coincident with infrared observations of the Spitzer Wide-Area Extragalactic Survey. The field is centred on the European Large Area ISO Survey S1 region and has a total area of 3.9 deg. We describe the observations and calibration, source extraction, and cross-matching to infrared sources. Two catalogues are presented; one of the radio components found in the image and one of radio sources with counterparts in the infrared and extracted from the literature. 1366 radio components were grouped into 1276 sources, 1183 of which were matched to infrared sources. We discover 31 radio sources with no infrared counterpart at all, adding to the class of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources.
  • We present the redshift distribution of the SHADES galaxy population based on the rest-frame radio-mm-FIR colours of 120 robustly detected 850um sources in the Lockman Hole East (LH) and Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF). The redshift distribution derived from the full SED information is shown to be narrower than that determined from the radio-submm spectral index, as more photometric bands contribute to a higher redshift accuracy. The redshift distribution of sources derived from at least two photometric bands peaks at z ~ 2.4 and has a near-Gaussian distribution, with 50 per cent (interquartile range) of sources at z=1.8-3.1. We find a statistically-significant difference between the measured redshift distributions in the two fields; the SXDF peaking at a slightly lower redshift (median z ~ 2.2) than the LH (median z ~ 2.7), which we attribute to the noise-properties of the radio observations. We demonstrate however that there could also be field-to-field variations that are consistent with the measured differences in the redshift distributions, and hence, that the incomplete area observed by SHADES with SCUBA, despite being the largest sub-mm survey to date, may still be too small to fully characterize the bright sub-mm galaxy population. Finally we present a brief comparison with the predicted, or assumed, redshift distributions of sub-mm galaxy formation and evolution models, and we derive the contribution of these SHADES sources and the general sub-mm galaxy population to the star formation-rate density at different epochs.
  • We present mid-infrared spectra of 5 submillimeter galaxies at z=0.65-2.38 taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Four of these sources, at z<1.5, have strong PAH features and their composite spectrum is well fitted by an M82-like spectrum with an additional power-law component consistent with that expected from AGN activity. Based on a comparison of the 7.7-micron PAH equivalent width and the PAH-to-infrared luminosity ratio of these galaxies with local templates, we conclude that these galaxies host both star-formation and AGN activity, with star-formation dominating the bolometric luminosity. The source at z=2.38 displays a Mrk231-type broad feature at restframe ~8 micron that does not conform to the typical 7.7/8.6 micron PAH complex in starburst galaxies, suggesting a more substantial AGN contribution.
  • As a short introduction to the astronomy session, the response of the community to the Call for Themes issued by ESA and the specific themes selected by the Astronomy Working Group are briefly presented in connection with the four grand themes finally selected for the ESA Science Programme. They are placed in the context of the main discoveries of the past decade and the astronomy projects currently in their development or definition phase. Finally, possible strategies for their implementation are summarised.