• We present a study of hierarchical structure in the Perseus molecular cloud, from the scale of the entire cloud ($\gtrsim$10 pc) to smaller clumps ($\sim$1 pc), cores ($\sim$0.05-0.1 pc), envelopes ($\sim$300-3000 AU) and protostellar objects ($\sim$15 AU). We use new observations from the Submillimeter Array (SMA) large project "Mass Assembly of Stellar Systems and their Evolution with the SMA (MASSES)" to probe the envelopes, and recent single-dish and interferometric observations from the literature for the remaining scales. This is the first study to analyze hierarchical structure over five scales in the same cloud complex. We compare the number of fragments with the number of Jeans masses in each scale to calculate the Jeans efficiency, or the ratio of observed to expected number of fragments. The velocity dispersion is assumed to arise either from purely thermal motions, or from combined thermal and non-thermal motions inferred from observed spectral line widths. For each scale, thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts more fragments than observed, corresponding to inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation. For the smallest scale, thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation also predicts too many protostellar objects. However at each of the larger scales thermal plus non-thermal Jeans fragmentation predicts fewer than one fragment, corresponding to no fragmentation into envelopes, cores, and clumps. Over all scales, the results are inconsistent with complete Jeans fragmentation based on either thermal or thermal plus non-thermal motions. They are more nearly consistent with inefficient thermal Jeans fragmentation, where the thermal Jeans efficiency increases from the largest to the smallest scale.
  • Theoretical models and spectroscopic observations of newborn stars suggest that protoplantary disks have an inner "wall" at a distance set by the disk interaction with the star. Around T Tauri stars, the size of this disk hole is expected to be on a 0.1-AU scale that is unresolved by current adaptive optics imaging, though some model-dependent constraints have been obtained by near-infrared interferometry. Here we report the first measurement of the inner disk wall around a solar-mass young stellar object, YLW 16B in the {\rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region, by detecting the light travel time of the variable radiation from the stellar surface to the disk. Consistent time lags were detected on two nights, when the time series in H (1.6 {\mu}m) and K (2.2 {\mu}m) bands were synchronized while the 4.5 {\mu}m emission lagged by 74.5 +/- 3.2 seconds. Considering the nearly edge-on geometry of the disk, the inner rim should be 0.084 AU from the protostar on average, with an error of order 0.01 AU. This size is likely larger than the range of magnetospheric truncations, and consistent with an optically and geometrically thick disk front at the dust sublimation radius at ~1500 K. The widths of the cross-correlation functions between the data in different wavebands place possible new constraints on the geometry of the disk.
  • We examine the light and color evolution of the T Tauri binary KH 15D through photometry obtained at wavelengths between 0.55 and 8.0 $\mu$m. The data were collected with ANDICAM on the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro-Tololo Inter-American Observatory and with IRAC on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We show that the system's circumbinary ring, which acts as a screen that covers and uncovers different portions of the binary orbit as the ring precesses, has reached an orientation where the brighter component (star B) fully or nearly fully emerges during each orbital cycle. The fainter component (star A) remains fully occulted by the screen at all phases. The leading and trailing edges of the screen move across the sky at the same rate of $\sim$15 meters per second, consistent with expectation for a ring with a radius and width of $\sim$4 AU and a precession period of $\sim$6500 years. Light and color variations continue to indicate that the screen is sharp edged and opaque at \emph{VRIJH} wavelengths. However, we find an increasing transparency of the ring edge at 2.2, 3.6, and 4.5 $\mu$m. Reddening seen at the beginning of the eclipse that occurred during the CSI 2264 campaign particularly suggests selective extinction by a population of large dust grains. Meanwhile, the gradual bluing observed while star B is setting is indicative of forward scattering effects at the edge of the ring. The SED of the system at its bright phase shows no evidence of infrared excess emission that can be attributed to radiation from the ring or other dust component out to 8 microns.
  • We present the initial results of our investigation of the star-forming complex W49, one of the youngest and most luminous massive star forming regions in our Galaxy. We used Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) data to investigate massive star formation with the primary objective to locate a representative set of protostars and the clusters of young stars that are forming around them. We present our source catalog with the mosaics from the IRAC data. In this study we used a combination of IRAC, MIPS, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and UKIRT Deep Infrared Sky Survey (UKIDSS) data to identify and classify the Young Stellar Objects (YSOs). We identified 232 Class 0/I YSOs, 907 Class II YSOs, and 74 transition disk candidate objects using color-color and color-magnitude diagrams. In addition, to understand the evolution of star formation in W49 we analysed the distribution of YSOs in the region to identify clusters using a minimal spanning tree method. The fraction of YSOs that belong to clusters with >7 members is found to be 52% for a cut-off distance of 96" and the ratio of Class II/I objects is 2.1. We compared the W49 region to the G305 and G333 star forming regions and concluded that the W49 has the richest population with 7 subclusters of YSOs.
  • LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 during roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of $\sim$100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of order a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27$\pm$5 $\mu$Jy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, $53\pm$11 $\mu$Jy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.
  • We present the full catalog of Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) identified in the 18 molecular clouds surveyed by the Spitzer Space Telescope "cores to disks" (c2d) and "Gould Belt" (GB) Legacy surveys. Using standard techniques developed by the c2d project, we identify 3239 candidate YSOs in the 18 clouds, 2966 of which survive visual inspection and form our final catalog of YSOs in the Gould Belt. We compile extinction corrected SEDs for all 2966 YSOs and calculate and tabulate the infrared spectral index, bolometric luminosity, and bolometric temperature for each object. We find that 326 (11%), 210 (7%), 1248 (42%), and 1182 (40%) are classified as Class 0+I, Flat-spectrum, Class II, and Class III, respectively, and show that the Class III sample suffers from an overall contamination rate by background AGB stars between 25% and 90%. Adopting standard assumptions, we derive durations of 0.40-0.78 Myr for Class 0+I YSOs and 0.26-0.50 Myr for Flat-spectrum YSOs, where the ranges encompass uncertainties in the adopted assumptions. Including information from (sub)millimeter wavelengths, one-third of the Class 0+I sample is classified as Class 0, leading to durations of 0.13-0.26 Myr (Class 0) and 0.27-0.52 Myr (Class I). We revisit infrared color-color diagrams used in the literature to classify YSOs and propose minor revisions to classification boundaries in these diagrams. Finally, we show that the bolometric temperature is a poor discriminator between Class II and Class III YSOs.
  • In this contribution, we describe the applied methods to construct a 24 micron based point source catalog derived from the image data of the MIPSGAL 24 micron Galactic Plane Survey and the corresponding data products. The high quality catalog product contains 933,818 sources, with a total of 1,353,228 in the full archive catalog. The source tables include positional and photometric informa- tion derived from the 24 micron images, source quality and confusion flags and coun- terpart photometry from matched 2MASS, GLIMPSE, and WISE point sources. Completeness decay data cubes are constructed at 1 arcminute angular resolution that describe the varying background levels over the MIPSGAL field and the ability to extract sources of a given magnitude from this background. The completeness decay cubes are included in the set of data products. We present the results of our efforts to verify the astrometric and photometric calibration of the catalog, and present several analyses of minor anomalies in these measurements to justify adopted mitigation strategies.
  • We present Spitzer 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, and 24 micron images of the Mon OB1 East giant molecular cloud, which contains the young star forming region NGC 2264, as well as more extended star formation. With Spitzer data and 2MASS photometry, we identify and classify young stellar objects (YSOs) with dusty circumstellar disks and/or envelopes in Mon OB1 East by their infrared-excess emission and study their distribution with respect to cloud material. We find a correlation between the local surface density of YSOs and column density of molecular gas as traced by dust extinction that is roughly described as a power law in these quantities. NGC 2264 follows a power law index of ~2.7, exhibiting a large YSO surface density for a given gas column density. Outside of NGC 2264 where the surface density of YSOs is lower, the power law is shallower and the region exhibits a larger gas column density for a YSO surface density, suggesting the star formation is more recent. In order to measure the fraction of cloud members with circumstellar disks/envelopes, we estimate the number of diskless pre-main sequence stars by statistical removal of background star detections. We find that the disk fraction of the NGC 2264 region is 45%, while the surrounding more distributed regions show a disk fraction of 19%. This may be explained by the presence an older, more dispersed population of stars. In total, the Spitzer observations provide evidence for heterogenous, non-coeval star formation throughout the Mon OB1 cloud.
  • We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70 and 160 micron observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 sq-deg with IRAC and 10.47 sq-deg with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHalpha 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the fraction of YSOs in the region with disks relative to an estimate of the diskless YSO population. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15 - 20 times fewer stars.
  • We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using $V$ and $R$ photometry from the literature, $g$,$r$,$i$ and $z$ photometry from SDSS and $J$, $H$, and $K_{s}$ photometry from 2MASS. These color excess ratios were the used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the $R_{V} = 3.1$ and $R_{V} = 5$ laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic ISM and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight $A_{V}$ is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with $A_{V} > 2.5$ magnitudes. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.
  • We examine the effects of pre-processing across the Coma Supercluster, including 3505 galaxies over 500 sq deg, by quantifying the degree to which star-forming (SF) activity is quenched as a function of environment. We characterise environment using the complementary techniques of Voronoi Tessellation, to measure the density field, and the Minimal Spanning Tree, to define continuous structures, and so we measure SF activity as a function of local density and the type of environment (cluster, group, filament, and void), and quantify the degree to which environment contributes to quenching of SF activity. Our sample covers over two orders of magnitude in stellar mass (10^8.5 to 10^11 Msun), and consequently we trace the effects of environment on SF activity for dwarf and massive galaxies, distinguishing so-called "mass quenching" from "environment quenching". Environmentally-driven quenching of SF activity, measured relative to the void galaxies, occurs to progressively greater degrees in filaments, groups, and clusters, and this trend holds for dwarf and massive galaxies alike. A similar trend is found using g-r colours, but with a more significant disparity between galaxy mass bins driven by increased internal dust extinction in massive galaxies. The SFR distributions of massive SF galaxies have no significant environmental dependence, but the distributions for dwarf SF galaxies are found to be statistically distinct in most environments. Pre-processing plays a significant role at low redshift, as environmentally-driven galaxy evolution affects nearly half of the galaxies in the group environment, and a significant fraction of the galaxies in the more diffuse filaments. Our study underscores the need for sensitivity to dwarf galaxies to separate mass-driven from environmentally-driven effects, and the use of unbiased tracers of SF activity.
  • One puzzle in understanding how stars form in clusters is the source of mass -- is all of the mass in place before the first stars are born, or is there an extended period when the cluster accretes material which can continuously fuel the star formation process? We use a multi-line spectral survey of the southern filament associated with the Serpens South embedded cluster-forming region in order to determine if mass is accreting from the filament onto the cluster, and whether the accretion rate is significant. Our analysis suggests that material is flowing along the filament's long axis at a rate of ~30Msol/Myr (inferred from the N2H+ velocity gradient along the filament), and radially contracting onto the filament at ~130Msol/Myr (inferred from HNC self-absorption). These accretion rates are sufficient to supply mass to the central cluster at a similar rate to the current star formation rate in the cluster. Filamentary accretion flows may therefore be very important in the ongoing evolution of this cluster.
  • Motivated by the long-standing "luminosity problem" in low-mass star formation whereby protostars are underluminous compared to theoretical expectations, we identify 230 protostars in 18 molecular clouds observed by two Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy surveys of nearby star-forming regions. We compile complete spectral energy distributions, calculate Lbol for each source, and study the protostellar luminosity distribution. This distribution extends over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 Lsun - 69 Lsun, and has a mean and median of 4.3 Lsun and 1.3 Lsun, respectively. The distributions are very similar for Class 0 and Class I sources except for an excess of low luminosity (Lbol < 0.5 Lsun) Class I sources compared to Class 0. 100 out of the 230 protostars (43%) lack any available data in the far-infrared and submillimeter (70 um < wavelength < 850 um) and have Lbol underestimated by factors of 2.5 on average, and up to factors of 8-10 in extreme cases. Correcting these underestimates for each source individually once additional data becomes available will likely increase both the mean and median of the sample by 35% - 40%. We discuss and compare our results to several recent theoretical studies of protostellar luminosities and show that our new results do not invalidate the conclusions of any of these studies. As these studies demonstrate that there is more than one plausible accretion scenario that can match observations, future attention is clearly needed. The better statistics provided by our increased dataset should aid such future work.
  • We map the full extent of a rich massive young cluster in the Cep OB3b association with the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the {\it Spitzer} Space Telescope and the ACIS instrument aboard the $\it{Chandra}$ X-Ray Observatory. At 700 pc, it is revealed to be the second nearest large ($>1000$ member), young ($< 5$ Myr) cluster known. In contrast to the nearest large cluster, the Orion Nebula Cluster, Cep OB3b is only lightly obscured and is mostly located in a large cavity carved out of the surrounding molecular cloud. Our infrared and X-ray datasets, as well as visible photometry from the literature, are used to take a census of the young stars in Cep OB3b. We find that the young stars within the cluster are concentrated in two sub-clusters; an eastern sub-cluster, near the Cep B molecular clump, and a western sub-cluster, near the Cep F molecular clump. Using our census of young stars, we examine the fraction of young stars with infrared excesses indicative of circumstellar disks. We create a map of the disk fraction throughout the cluster and find that it is spatially variable. Due to these spatial variations, the two sub-clusters exhibit substantially different average disk fractions from each other: $32% \pm 4%$ and $50% \pm 6%$. We discuss whether the discrepant disk fractions are due to the photodestruction of disks by the high mass members of the cluster or whether they result from differences in the ages of the sub-clusters. We conclude that the discrepant disk fractions are most likely due to differences in the ages.
  • We report the discovery of ten proplyd-like objects in the vicinity of the massive OB association Cygnus OB2. They were discovered in IPHAS H-Alpha images and are clearly resolved in broad-band HST/ACS, near-IR and Spitzer mid-IR images. All exhibit the familiar tadpole shape seen in photoevaporating objects such as the Orion proplyds, with a bright ionization front at the head facing the central cluster of massive stars, and a tail stretching in the opposite direction. Many also show secondary ionization fronts, complex tail morphologies or multiple heads. We consider the evidence that these are either proplyds or `evaporating gaseous globules' (EGGs) left over from a fragmenting molecular cloud, but find that neither scenario fully explains the observations. Typical sizes are 50,000--100,000 AU, larger than the Orion proplyds, but in agreement with the theoretical scaling of proplyd size with distance from the ionizing source. These objects are located at projected separations of 6-14pc from the OB association, compared to 0.1pc for the Orion proplyds, but are clearly being photoionized by the 65 O-type stars in Cyg OB2. Central star candidates are identified in near- and mid-IR images, supporting the proplyd scenario, though their large sizes and notable asymmetries is more consistent with the EGG scenario. A third possibility is therefore considered, that these are a unique class of photoevaporating partially-embedded young stellar objects that have survived the destruction of their natal molecular cloud. This has implications for the properties of stars that form in the vicinity of massive stars.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS observations of a 0.85 deg^2 field including the Corona Australis (CrA) star-forming region. At a distance of 130 pc, CrA is one of the closest regions known to be actively forming stars, particularly within its embedded association, the Coronet. Using the Spitzer data, we identify 51 young stellar objects (YSOs) in CrA which include sources in the well-studied Coronet cluster as well as distributed throughout the molecular cloud. Twelve of the YSOs discussed are new candidates, one of which is located in the Coronet. Known YSOs retrieved from the literature are also added to the list, and a total of 116 candidate YSOs in CrA are compiled. Based on these YSO candidates, the star formation rate is computed to be 12 M_o Myr^-1, similar to that of the Lupus clouds. A clustering analysis was also performed, finding that the main cluster core, consisting of 68 members, is elongated (having an aspect ratio of 2.36), with a circular radius of 0.59 pc and mean surface density of 150 pc^-2. In addition, we analyze outflows and jets in CrA by means of new CO and H_2 data. We present 1.3 mm interferometric continuum observations made with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) covering R CrA, IRS 5, IRS 7, and IRAS 18595-3712 (IRAS 32). We also present multi-epoch H_2 maps and detect jets and outflows, study their proper motions, and identify exciting sources. The Spitzer and ISAAC/VLT observations of IRAS 32 show a bipolar precessing jet, which drives a CO (2-1) outflow detected in the SMA observations. There is also clear evidence for a parsec-scale precessing outflow, E-W oriented, and originating in the SMA 2 region, likely driven by SMA 2 or IRS 7A.
  • [abridged] Protoplanetary disks with AU-scale inner clearings, often referred to as transitional disks, provide a unique sample for understanding disk dissipation mechanisms and possible connections to planet formation. Observations of young stellar clusters with the Spitzer Space Telescope have amassed mid-infrared spectral energy distributions for thousands of star-disk systems from which transition disks can be identified. From a sample of 8 relatively nearby young regions (d <= 400 pc), we have identified about 20 such objects, which we term "classical" transition disks, spanning a wide range of stellar age and mass. We also identified two additional categories representing more ambiguous cases: "warm excess" objects with transition-like spectral energy distributions but moderate excess at 5.8 microns, and "weak excess" objects with smaller 24 micron excess that may be optically thin or exhibit advanced dust grain growth and settling. From existing Halpha emission measurements, we find evidence for different accretion activity among the three categories, with a majority of the classical and warm excess transition objects still accreting gas through their inner holes and onto the central stars, while a smaller fraction of the weak transition objects are accreting at detectable rates. We find a possible age dependence to the frequency of classical transition objects, with fractions relative to the total population of disks in a given region of a few percent at 1-2 Myr rising to 10-20% at 3-10 Myr. The trend is even stronger if the weak and warm excess objects are included. Classical transition disks appear to be less common, and weak transition disks more common, around lower-mass stars (M <= 0.3 Msun).
  • We have conducted a survey of a sample of infrared-dark clouds (IRDCs) with the Spitzer Space Telescope in order to explore their mass distribution. We present a method for tracing mass using dust absorption against the bright Galactic background at 8 microns. The IRDCs in this sample are comprised of tens of clumps, ranging in sizes from 0.02 to 0.3 pc in diameter and masses from 0.5 to a few 10 Msun, the broadest dynamic range in any clump mass spectrum study to date. Structure with this range in scales confirms that IRDCs are the the precursors to stellar clusters in an early phase of fragmentation. Young stars are distributed in the vicinity of the IRDCs, but the clumps are typically not associated with stars and appear pre-stellar in nature. We find an IRDC clump mass spectrum with a slope of 1.76 +/- 0.05 for masses from 30 to 3000 Msun. This slope is consistent with numerous studies, culled from a variety of observational techniques, of massive star formation regions and is close to the mass function of Galactic stellar clusters and star clusters in other galaxies. We assert that the shape of the mass function is an intrinsic and universal feature of massive star formation regions, that are the birth sites of stellar clusters. As these clouds evolve and their constituent clumps fragment, the mass spectrum will steepen and eventually assume the form of the core mass function that is observed locally.
  • We present images and initial results from our extensive Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of the W5 H II region with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We detect dense clusters of stars, centered on the O stars: HD 18326, BD +60 586, HD 17505 and HD 17520. At 24 microns substantial extended emission is visible, presumably from heated dust grains that survive in the strongly ionizing environment of the H {\sc ii} region. With photometry of more than 18000 point sources, we analyze the clustering properties of objects classified as young stars by their IR spectral energy distributions (a total of 2064 sources) across the region using a minimal-spanning-tree algorithm. We find ~40--70% of infrared excess sources belong to clusters with >10 members. We find that within the evacuated cavities of the H II regions that make up W5, the ratio of Class II to Class I sources is ~7 times higher than for objects coincident with molecular gas as traced by 12CO emission and near-IR extinction maps. We attribute this contrast to an age difference between the two locations, and postulate that at least two distinct generations of star formation are visible across W5. Our preliminary analysis shows that triggering is a plausible mechanism to explain the multiple generations of star formation in W5, and merits further investigation.
  • We present Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC and MIPS observations toward a sample of nine high-mass star forming regions at a distance of around 2 kpc. Based on IRAC and MIPS 24 $\mu$m photometric results and 2MASS JHKs data, we carry out a census of young stellar objects (YSOs) in a 5' by 5' field toward each region. Toward seven out of the nine regions, we detect parsec sized clusters with around 20 YSOs surrounded by a more extended and sparse distribution of young stars and protostars. For the other two regions, IRAS 20126+4104 and IRAS 22172+5549, the former has the lowest number of YSOs in the sample and shows no obvious cluster, and the latter appears to be part of a larger, potentially more evolved cluster. The deep IRAC imaging reveals at least twelve outflows in eight out of the nine regions, with nine outflows prominent in the 4.5 $\mu$m band most probably attributed to shocked H$_2$ emission, two outflows dominated by scattered light in the 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m bands, and one outflow standing out from its hydrocarbon emission in the 8.0 $\mu$m band. In comparison with previous ground-based observations, our IRAC observations reveal new outflow structures in five regions. The dramatically different morphologies of detected outflows can be tentatively interpreted in terms of possible evolution of massive outflows. The driving sources of these outflows are deeply embedded in dense dusty cores revealed by previous millimeter interferometric observations. We detect infrared counterparts of these dusty cores in the IRAC or MIPS 24 $\mu$m bands. Reflection nebulae dominated by the emission from UV heated hydrocarbons in the 8 $\mu$m band can be found in most regions and they may imply the presence of young B stars.
  • We report on the results of an approximately 90 ks Chandra observation of a complex region that hosts multiple sites of recent and active star formation in ARA OB1a. The field is centered on the embedded cluster RCW 108-IR and includes and a large portion of the open cluster NGC 6193. We detect over 420 X-ray sources in the field and combined these data with deep near-IR, Spitzer/IRAC and MSX mid-IR data. We find about 360 of the X-ray sources have near--IR counterparts. We divide the region into 5 parts based on the X-ray point source characteristics and extended 8 micron emission. The most clearly defined regions are the central region - identified by embedded sources with high luminosities in the both the near-IR and X-ray as well as high X-ray temperatures (about 3 keV) and the eastern region - identified by low extinction and 1 keV X-ray temperatures. Other regions, identified by their directional relationship to RCW 108-IR are less uniform - representing combinations of the first two regions, independent star formation epochs, or both. Over 18% percent of the cluster members with over 100 counts exhibit flares. Overall about 50% of the stars appear to have optically thick disks when IRAC data are employed. The largest fraction of X-ray sources are best described as possessing some disk material via a more detailed extinction fitting. We estimate that the total number of pre--main sequence stars in the field is about 1600. Approximately 800 are confined to (1.1 pc) central region.
  • We present {\it Spitzer} images of the relatively sparse, low luminosity young cluster L988e, as well as complementary near-infrared (NIR) and submillimeter images of the region. The cluster is asymmetric, with the western region of the cluster embedded within the molecular cloud, and the slightly less dense eastern region to the east of, and on the edge of, the molecular cloud. With these data, as well as with extant H$\alpha$ data of stars primarily found in the eastern region of the cluster, and a molecular $^{13}$CO gas emission map of the entire region, we investigate the distribution of forming young stars with respect to the cloud material, concentrating particularly on the differences and similarities between the exposed and embedded regions of the cluster. We also compare star formation in this region to that in denser, more luminous and more massive clusters already investigated in our comprehensive multi-wavelength study of young clusters within 1 kpc of the Sun.
  • Outflows from young stellar objects have been identified as a possible source of turbulence in molecular clouds. To investigate the relationship between outflows, cloud dynamics and turbulence, we compare the kinematics of the molecular gas associated with NGC 1333, traced in 13CO(1-0), with the distribution of young stellar objects (YSOs) within. We find a velocity dispersion of ~ 1-1.6 km/s in 13CO that does not significantly vary across the cloud, and is uncorrelated with the number of nearby young stellar outflows identified from optical and submillimeter observations. However, from velocity channel maps we identify about 20 cavities or depressions in the 13CO intensity of scales > 0.1-0.2 pc and velocity widths 1-3 km/s. The cavities exhibit limb brightened rims in both individual velocity channel maps and position velocity diagrams, suggesting that they are slowly expanding. We interpret these cavities to be remnants of past YSO outflow activity: If these cavities are presently empty, they would fill in on time scales of a million years. This can exceed the lifetime of a YSO outflow phase, or the transit time of the central star through the cavity, explaining the the absence of any clear correlation between the cavities and YSO outflows. We find that the momentum and energy deposition associated with the expansion of the cavities is sufficient to power the turbulence in the cloud. In this way we conclude that the cavities are an important intermediary step between the conversion of YSO outflow energy and momentum into cloud turbulent motions.
  • We compare the infrared colors predicted by theoretical models of protostellar envelopes and protoplanetary disks with initial observations of young stellar objects made with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope (Werner et al. 2004, Fazio et al. 2004). Disk and envelope models characterized by infall and/or accretion rates found in previous studies can quantitatively account for the range of IRAC colors found in four young embedded clusters: S 140, S 171, NGC 7129, and Cep C. The IRAC color-color diagram ([3.6]-[4.5] vs. [5.8]-[8.0]) can be used to help to distinguish between young stars with only disk emission and protostars with circumstellar envelopes.