• We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate $H(z)$, the angular-diameter distance $D_A(z)$, the normalised growth rate $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$, and the physical matter density $\Omega_mh^2$. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a `single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalise over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models, thus we develop a new methodology to speed up our analysis. We obtain $\{D_A(z)r_{s,fid}/r_s$Mpc, $H(z)r_s/r_{s,fid}$kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$, $f(z)\sigma_8(z)$, $\Omega_m h^2\}$ = $\{956\pm28$ , $75.0\pm4.0$ , $0.397 \pm 0.073$, $0.143\pm0.017\}$ at $z=0.32$ and $\{1421\pm23$, $96.7\pm2.7$ , $0.497 \pm 0.058$, $0.137\pm0.015\}$ at $z=0.59$ where $r_s$ is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and $r_{s,fid}=147.66$Mpc for the fiducial cosmology in this study. In addition, we divide the galaxy sample into four redshift bins to increase the sensitivity of redshift evolution. However, we do not find improvements in terms of constraining dark energy model parameters. Combining our measurements with Planck data, we obtain $\Omega_m=0.306\pm0.009$, $H_0=67.9\pm0.7$kms$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-1}$, and $\sigma_8=0.815\pm0.009$ assuming $\Lambda$CDM; $\Omega_k=0.000\pm0.003$ assuming oCDM; $w=-1.01\pm0.06$ assuming $w$CDM; and $w_0=-0.95\pm0.22$ and $w_a=-0.22\pm0.63$ assuming $w_0w_a$CDM. Our results show no tension with the flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological paradigm. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS.
  • We develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of $\{R$, $l_a$, $\Omega_b h^2$, $n_s$, $log(A_s)$, $\Omega_k$, $H(z)$, $D_A(z)$, $f(z)\sigma_8(z)\}$, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where $R=\sqrt{\Omega_m H_0^2}\,r(z_*)$, and $l_a=\pi r(z_*)/r_s(z_*)$, $z_*$ is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and $r(z_*)$ and $r_s(z_*)$ denote our comoving distance to $z_*$ and sound horizon at $z_*$ respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. $\Omega_b h^2$ and $n_s$. Using our double-probe results, we obtain $\Omega_m=0.304\pm0.009$, $H_0=68.2\pm0.7$, and $\sigma_8=0.806\pm0.014$ assuming $\Lambda$CDM; and $\Omega_k=0.002\pm0.003$ and $w=-1.00\pm0.07$ assuming o$w$CDM. The results show no tension with the flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood analyses with fixed dark energy models, we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints which can be conveniently used to study dark energy models. We extend our study to measure the sum of neutrino mass and obtain $\Sigma m_\nu<0.10/0.22$ (68\%/95\%) assuming $\Lambda$CDM and $\Sigma m_\nu<0.26/0.52$ (68\%/95\%) assuming $w$CDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS.
  • Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Supernova Survey-II, we measure the rate of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) as a function of galaxy properties at intermediate redshift. A sample of 342 SNe Ia with 0.05<z<0.25 is constructed. Using broad-band photometry we use the PEGASE spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to estimate host galaxy stellar masses and recent star-formation rates. We find that the rate of SNe Ia per unit stellar mass is significantly higher (by a factor of ~30) in highly star-forming galaxies compared to passive galaxies. When parameterizing the SN Ia rate (SNR_Ia) based on host galaxy properties, we find that the rate of SNe Ia in passive galaxies is not linearly proportional to the stellar mass, instead a SNR_Ia proportional to M^0.68 is favored. However, such a parameterization does not describe the observed SN Ia rate in star-forming galaxies. The SN Ia rate in star-forming galaxies is well fit by SNR_Ia = 1.05\pm0.16x10^{-10} M ^{0.68\pm0.01} + 1.01\pm0.09x10^{-3} SFR^{1.00\pm0.05} (statistical errors only), where M is the host galaxy mass and SFR is the star-formation rate. These results are insensitive to the selection criteria used, redshift limit considered and the inclusion of non-spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia. We also show there is a dependence between the distribution of the MLCS light-curve decline rate parameter, \Delta, and host galaxy type. Passive galaxies host less luminous SNe Ia than seen in moderately and highly star-forming galaxies, although a population of luminous SNe is observed in passive galaxies, contradicting previous assertions that these SNe Ia are only observed in younger stellar systems. The MLCS extinction parameter, A_V, is similar in passive and moderately star-forming galaxies, but we find indications that it is smaller, on average, in highly star-forming galaxies. We confirm these results using the SALT2 light-curve fitter.
  • We present an analysis of peculiar velocities and their effect on supernova cosmology. In particular, we study (a) the corrections due to our own motion, (b) the effects of correlations in peculiar velocities induced by large-scale structure, and (c) uncertainties arising from a possible local under- or over-density. For all of these effects we present a case study of their impact on the cosmology derived by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SN Survey). Correcting supernova redshifts for the CMB dipole slightly over-corrects nearby supernovae that share some of our local motion. We show that while neglecting the CMB dipole would cause a shift in the derived equation of state of Delta w ~ 0.04 (at fixed matter density) the additional local-motion correction is currently negligible (Delta w<0.01). We use a covariance-matrix approach to statistically account for correlated peculiar velocities. This down-weights nearby supernovae and effectively acts as a graduated version of the usual sharp low-redshift cut. Neglecting coherent velocities in the current sample causes a systematic shift of ~2% in the preferred value of w and will therefore have to be considered carefully when future surveys aim for percent-level accuracy. Finally, we perform n-body simulations to estimate the likely magnitude of any local density fluctuation (monopole) and estimate the impact as a function of the low-redshift cutoff. We see that for this aspect the low-z cutoff of z=0.02 is well-justified theoretically, but that living in a putative local density fluctuation leaves an indelible imprint on the magnitude-redshift relation.
  • We outline our first steps towards marrying two new and emerging technologies; the Virtual Observatory (e.g, AstroGrid) and the computational grid. We discuss the construction of VOTechBroker, which is a modular software tool designed to abstract the tasks of submission and management of a large number of computational jobs to a distributed computer system. The broker will also interact with the AstroGrid workflow and MySpace environments. We present our planned usage of the VOTechBroker in computing a huge number of n-point correlation functions from the SDSS, as well as fitting over a million CMBfast models to the WMAP data.