• The rotational Doppler effect associated with light's orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been found as a powerful tool to detect rotating bodies. However, this method was only demonstrated experimentally on the laboratory scale under well controlled conditions so far. And its real potential lies at the practical applications in the field of remote sensing. We have established a 120-meter long free-space link between the rooftops of two buildings and show that both the rotation speed and the rotational symmetry of objects can be identified from the detected rotational Doppler frequency shift signal at photon count level. Effects of possible slight misalignments and atmospheric turbulences are quantitatively analyzed in terms of mode power spreading to the adjacent modes as well as the transfer of rotational frequency shifts. Moreover, our results demonstrate that with the preknowledge of the object's rotational symmetry one may always deduce the rotation speed no matter how strong the coupling to neighboring modes is. Without any information of the rotating object, the deduction of the object's symmetry and rotational speed may still be obtained as long as the mode spreading efficiency does not exceed 50 %. Our work supports the feasibility of a practical sensor to remotely detect both the speed and symmetry of rotating bodies.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) offers the possibility for two individuals to communicate a securely encrypted message. From the time of its inception in 1984 by Bennett and Brassard, QKD has been the result of intense research. One technical challenge is the monitoring of signal disturbance in a QKD system to bound the information leakage towards an unwanted eavesdropper. Recently, the round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol, which encodes bits of information in a high-dimensional state space, was proposed to solve this exact problem. Since its introduction, many realizations of the RRDPS protocol were demonstrated using trains of coherent pulses. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate an implementation of the RRDPS protocol using the photonic orbital angular momentum degree of freedom. In particular, we show that Alice's generation stage and Bob's detection stage can each be reduced to a single phase element, greatly simplifying its implementation. Our scheme offers a practical demonstration of the RRDPS protocol which will suppress the need for monitoring signal disturbance in free-space channels.
  • Quantum key distribution is on the verge of real world applications, where perfectly secure information can be distributed among multiple parties. Several quantum cryptographic protocols have been theoretically proposed and independently realized in different experimental conditions. Here, we develop an experimental platform based on high-dimensional orbital angular momentum states of single photons that enables implementation of multiple quantum key distribution protocols with a single experimental apparatus. Our versatile approach allows us to experimentally survey different classes of quantum key distribution techniques, such as the 1984 Bennett & Brassard (BB84), tomographic protocols including the six-state and the Singapore protocol, and a recently introduced differential phase shift (Chau15) protocol. This enables us to experimentally compare the performance of these techniques and discuss their benefits and deficiencies in terms of noise tolerance in different dimensions. Our analysis gives an overview of the available quantum key distribution protocols for photonic orbital angular momentum and highlights the benefits of the presented schemes for different implementations and channel conditions.
  • Quantum communication has been successfully implemented in optical fibres and through free-space [1-3]. Fibre systems, though capable of fast key rates and low quantum bit error rates (QBERs), are impractical in communicating with destinations without an established fibre link [4]. Free-space quantum channels can overcome such limitations and reach long distances with the advent of satellite-to-ground links [5-8]. Shorter line-of-sight free-space links have also been realized for intra-city conditions [2, 9]. However, turbulence, resulting from local fluctuations in refractive index, becomes a major challenge by adding errors and losses [10]. Recently, an interest in investigating the possibility of underwater quantum channels has arisen, which could provide global secure communication channels among submersibles and boats [11-13]. Here, we investigate the effect of turbulence on an underwater quantum channel using twisted photons in outdoor conditions. We study the effect of turbulence on transmitted QBERs, and compare different QKD protocols in an underwater quantum channel showing the feasibility of high-dimensional encoding schemes. Our work may open the way for secure high-dimensional quantum communication between submersibles, and provides important input for potential submersibles-to-satellite quantum communication.
  • Quantum information science and quantum information technology have seen a virtual explosion world-wide. It is all based on the observation that fundamental quantum phenomena on the individual particle or system-level lead to completely novel ways of encoding, processing and transmitting information. Quantum mechanics, a child of the first third of the 20th century, has found numerous realizations and technical applications, much more than was thought at the beginning. Decades later, it became possible to do experiments with individual quantum particles and quantum systems. This was due to technological progress, and for light in particular, the development of the laser. Hitherto, nearly all experiments and also nearly all realizations in the fields have been performed with qubits, which are two-level quantum systems. We suggest that this limitation is again mainly a technological one, because it is very difficult to create, manipulate and measure more complex quantum systems. Here, we provide a specific overview of some recent developments with higher-dimensional quantum systems. We mainly focus on Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) states of photons and possible applications in quantum information protocols. Such states form discrete higher-dimensional quantum systems, also called qudits. Specifically, we will first address the question what kind of new fundamental properties exist and the quantum information applications which are opened up by such novel systems. Then we give an overview of recent developments in the field by discussing several notable experiments over the past 2-3 years. Finally, we conclude with several important open questions which will be interesting for investigations in the future.
  • Caustics are natural phenomena in which nature concentrates the energy of waves. Although, they are known mostly in optics, caustics are intrinsic to all wave phenomena. For example, studies show that fluctuations in the profile of an ocean floor can generate random caustics and focus the energy of tsunami waves. Caustics share many similarities to rogue waves, as they both exhibit heavy-tailed distribution, i.e. an overpopulation of large events. Linear Schr\"odinger-type equations are usually used to explain the wave dynamics of caustics. However, in that the wave amplitude increases dramatically in caustics, nonlinearity is inevitable in many systems. In this Letter, we investigate the effect of nonlinearity on the formation of optical caustics. We show experimentally that, in contrast to linear systems, even small phase fluctuations can generate strong caustics upon nonlinear propagation. We simulated our experiment based on the nonlinear Schr\"odinger equation (NLSE) with Kerr-type nonlinearity, which describes the wave dynamics not only in optics, but also in some other physical systems such as oceans. Therefore, our results may also aid our understanding of ocean phenomena.
  • Induced coherence in parametric down-conversion between two coherently pumped nonlinear crystals that share a common idler mode can be used as an imaging technique. Based on the interference between the two signal modes of the crystals, an image can be reconstructed. By obtaining an expression for the interference pattern that is valid in both the low- and the high-gain regimes of parametric down-conversion, we show how the coherence of the light emitted by the two crystals can be controlled. With our comprehensive analysis we provide deeper insight into recent discussions about the application of induced coherence to imaging in different regimes. Moreover, we propose a scheme for optimizing the visibility of the interference pattern so that it directly corresponds to the degree of coherence of the light generated in the two crystals. We find that this scheme leads in the high-gain regime to a visibility arbitrarily close to unity.
  • The need to increase data transfer rates constitutes a key challenge in modern information-driven societies. Taking advantage of the transverse spatial modes of light to encode more information is a promising avenue for both classical and quantum photonics. However, to ease access to the encoded information, it is essential to be able to sort spatial modes into different output channels. Here, we introduce a novel way to customize the sorting of arbitrary spatial light modes. Our method relies on the high degree of control over random scattering processes by preshaping of the phase structure of the incident light. We demonstrate experimentally that various sets of modes, irrespective of their specific modal structure, can be transformed to any output channel arrangement. Thus, our method enables full access to all of the information encoded in the transverse structure of the field, for example, azimuthal and radial modes. We also demonstrate that coherence is retained in this complex mode transformation, which opens up applications in quantum and classical information science.
  • The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the 3D arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility to outperform classical measurements. This holds particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high powers, a potential concern for chiroptical studies. Here we show the first experiment in which multi-wavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme we employ for probing the wavelength dependence allows to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement, and can also be used for more general differential measurements.
  • Light beams with orbital angular momentum (OAM) are convenient carriers of quantum information. They can be also used for imparting rotational motion to particles and provide high resolution in imaging. Due to the conservation of OAM in parametric down-conversion (PDC), signal and idler photons generated at low gain have perfectly anti-correlated OAM values. It is interesting to study the OAM properties of high-gain PDC, where the same OAM modes can be populated with large, but correlated, numbers of photons. Here we investigate the OAM spectrum of high-gain PDC and show that the OAM mode content can be controlled by varying the pump power and the configuration of the source. In our experiment, we use a source consisting of two nonlinear crystals separated by an air gap. We discuss the OAM properties of PDC radiation emitted by this source and suggest possible modifications.
  • Quantum key distribution (QKD) promises information-theoretically secure communication, and is already on the verge of commercialization. Thus far, different QKD protocols have been proposed theoretically and implemented experimentally [1, 2]. The next step will be to implement high-dimensional protocols in order to improve noise resistance and increase the data rate [3-7]. Hitherto, no experimental verification of high-dimensional QKD in the single-photon regime has been conducted outside of the laboratory. Here, we report the realization of such a single-photon QKD system in a turbulent free-space link of 0.3 km over the city of Ottawa, taking advantage of both the spin and orbital angular momentum photonic degrees of freedom. This combination of optical angular momenta allows us to create a 4-dimensional state [8]; wherein, using a high-dimensional BB84 protocol [3, 4], a quantum bit error rate of 11\% was attained with a corresponding secret key rate of 0.65 bits per sifted photon. While an error rate of 5\% with a secret key rate of 0.43 bits per sifted photon is achieved for the case of 2-dimensional structured photons. Even through moderate turbulence without active wavefront correction, it is possible to securely transmit information carried by structured photons, opening the way for intra-city high-dimensional quantum communications under realistic conditions.
  • The validity of the superposition principle and of Born's rule are well-accepted tenants of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly, it has recently been predicted that the intensity pattern formed in a three-slit experiment is seemingly in contradiction with the predictions of the most conventional form of the superposition principle when exotic looped trajectories are taken into account. However, the probability of observing such paths is typically very small and thus rendering them extremely difficult to measure. In this work, we confirm the validity of Born's rule and present the first experimental observation of these exotic trajectories as additional paths for the light by directly measuring their contribution to the formation of optical interference fringes. We accomplish this by enhancing the electromagnetic near-fields in the vicinity of the slits through the excitation of surface plasmons. This process effectively increases the probability of occurrence of these exotic trajectories, demonstrating that they are related to the near-field component of the photon's wavefunction.
  • Converting spin angular momentum to orbital angular momentum has been shown to be a practical and efficient method for generating optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum and possessing a space-varying polarized field. Here, we present novel liquid crystal devices for tailoring the wavefront of optical beams through the Pancharatnam-Berry phase concept. We demonstrate the versatility of these devices by generating an extensive range of optical beams such as beams carrying $\pm200$ units of orbital angular momentum along with Bessel, Airy and Ince-Gauss beams. We characterize both the phase and the polarization properties of the generated beams, confirming our devices' performance.
  • Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although such perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signalling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. Here, we perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states, and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on \emph{cloned} photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated in order to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.
  • We present a detailed security analysis of a d-dimensional quantum key distribution protocol based on two and three mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) both in an asymptotic and finite key length scenario. The finite secret key rates are calculated as a function of the length of the sifted key by (i) generalizing the uncertainly relation-based insight from BB84 to any d-level 2-MUB QKD protocol and (ii) by adopting recent advances in the second-order asymptotics for finite block length quantum coding (for both d-level 2- and 3-MUB QKD protocols). Since the finite and asymptotic secret key rates increase with d and the number of MUBs (together with the tolerable threshold) such QKD schemes could in principle offer an important advantage over BB84. We discuss the possibility of an experimental realization of the 3-MUB QKD protocol with the orbital angular momentum degrees of freedom of photons.
  • Photons with a twisted phase front carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM) and have become important in various fields of optics, such as quantum and classical information science or optical tweezers. Because no upper limit on the OAM content per photon is known, they are also interesting systems to experimentally challenge quantum mechanical prediction for high quantum numbers. Here, we take advantage of a recently developed technique to imprint unprecedented high values of OAM, namely spiral phase mirrors (SPM), to generate photons with more than 10,000 quanta of OAM. Moreover, we demonstrate quantum entanglement between these large OAM quanta of one photon and the polarization of its partner photon. To our knowledge, this corresponds to entanglement with the largest quantum number that has been demonstrated in an experiment. The results may also open novel ways to couple single photons to massive objects, enhance angular resolution and highlight OAM as a promising way to increase the information capacity of a single photon.
  • Spatial modes of light can potentially carry a vast amount of information, making them promising candidates for both classical and quantum communication. However, the distribution of such modes over large distances remains difficult. Intermodal coupling complicates their use with common fibers, while free-space transmission is thought to be strongly influenced by atmospheric turbulence. Here we show the transmission of orbital angular momentum modes of light over a distance of 143 kilometers between two Canary Islands, which is 50 times greater than the maximum distance achieved previously. As a demonstration of the transmission quality, we use superpositions of these modes to encode a short message. At the receiver, an artificial neural network is used for distinguishing between the different twisted light superpositions. The algorithm is able to identify different mode superpositions with an accuracy of more than 80% up to the third mode order, and decode the transmitted message with an error rate of 8.33%. Using our data, we estimate that the distribution of orbital angular momentum entanglement over more than 100 kilometers of free space is feasible. Moreover, the quality of our free-space link can be further improved by the use of state-of-the-art adaptive optics systems.
  • Quantum mechanics predicts a number of at first sight counterintuitive phenomena. It is therefore a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. And indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states -- a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experiments. The ability to automate the design of a quantum experiment can be applied to many quantum systems and allows the physical realization of quantum states previously thought of only on paper.
  • The spatial modes of photons are one realization of a QuDit, a quantum system that is described in a D-dimensional Hilbert space. In order to perform quantum information tasks with QuDits, a general class of D-dimensional unitary transformations is needed. Among these, cyclic transformations are an important special case required in many high-dimensional quantum communication protocols. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a cyclic transformation in the high-dimensional space of photonic orbital angular momentum (OAM). Using simple linear optical components, we show a successful four-fold cyclic transformation of OAM modes. Interestingly, our experimental setup was found by a computer algorithm. In addition to the four-cyclic transformation, the algorithm also found extensions to higher-dimensional cycles in a hybrid space of OAM and polarization. Besides being useful for quantum cryptography with QuDits, cyclic transformations are key for the experimental production of high-dimensional maximally entangled Bell-states.
  • Entanglement lies at the heart of quantum mechanics $-$ as a fundamental tool for testing its deep rift with classical physics, while also providing a key resource for quantum technologies such as quantum computation and cryptography. In 1987 Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger realized that the entanglement of more than two particles implies a non-statistical conflict between local realism and quantum mechanics. The resulting predictions were experimentally confirmed by entangling three photons in their polarization. Experimental efforts since have singularly focused on increasing the number of particles entangled, while remaining in a two-dimensional space for each particle. Here we show the experimental generation of the first multi-photon entangled state where both $-$ the number of particles and the number of dimensions $-$ are greater than two. Interestingly, our state exhibits an asymmetric entanglement structure that is only possible when one considers multi-particle entangled states in high dimensions. Two photons in our state reside in a three-dimensional space, while the third lives in two dimensions. Our method relies on combining two pairs of photons, high-dimensionally entangled in their orbital angular momentum, in such a way that information about their origin is erased. Additionally, we show how this state enables a new type of "layered" quantum cryptographic protocol where two parties share an additional layer of secure information over that already shared by all three parties. In addition to their application in novel quantum communication protocols, such asymmetric entangled states serve as a manifestation of the complex dance of correlations that can exist within quantum mechanics.
  • Photons with a twisted phase front can carry a discrete, in principle unbounded amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM). The large state space allows for complex types of entanglement, interesting both for quantum communication and for fundamental tests of quantum theory. However, the distribution of such entangled states over large distances was thought to be infeasible due to influence of atmospheric turbulence, indicating a serious limitation on their usefulness. Here we show that it is possible to distribute quantum entanglement encoded in OAM over a turbulent intra-city link of 3 kilometers. We confirm quantum entanglement of the first two higher-order levels (with OAM=$\pm 1 \hbar$ and $\pm 2 \hbar$). They correspond to four new quantum channels orthogonal to all that have been used in long-distance quantum experiments so far. Therefore a promising application would be quantum communication with a large alphabet. We also demonstrate that our link allows access to up to 11 quantum channels of OAM. The restrictive factors towards higher numbers are technical limitations that can be circumvented with readily available technologies.
  • In the study of systems that cannot be described classically, the Wigner inequality, has received only a small amount of attention. In this paper we extend the Wigner inequality - originally derived in 1969 - and show how it may be used to contradict local realism with only coincidence detections in the absence of two-outcome measurements - that is, for any system where only one possible result of a pair of potential outcomes can be registered. It thus encapsulates a much broader class of measurement schemes than could previously violate a local-realistic inequality. This is possible due to an assumption of "extended fairness" on the measurement outcomes, which we posit is highly plausible. We then apply this inequality to a recently constructed setup with access to entangled pairs of photons with very high angular momenta, in which no previously derived local-realistic inequality could successfully be used without making very broad assumptions. To our knowledge this experiment constitutes a violation of local realism with the largest quanta to date. We thus demonstrate the versatility of this inequality under very lossy conditions.
  • The transverse spatial modes of light offer a large state-space with interesting physical properties. For exploiting it in future long-distance experiments, spatial modes will have to be transmitted over turbulent free-space links. Numerous recent lab-scale experiments have found significant degradation in the mode quality after transmission through simulated turbulence and consecutive coherent detection. Here we experimentally analyze the transmission of one prominent class of spatial modes, the orbital-angular momentum (OAM) modes, through 3 km of strong turbulence over the city of Vienna. Instead of performing a coherent phase-dependent measurement, we employ an incoherent detection scheme which relies on the unambiguous intensity patterns of the different spatial modes. We use a pattern recognition algorithm (an artificial neural network) to identify the characteristic mode pattern displayed on a screen at the receiver. We were able to distinguish between 16 different OAM mode superpositions with only ~1.7% error, and use them to encode and transmit small grey-scale images. Moreover, we found that the relative phase of the superposition modes is not affected by the atmosphere, establishing the feasibility for performing long-distance quantum experiments with the OAM of photons. Our detection method works for other classes of spatial modes with unambiguous intensity patterns as well, and can further be improved by modern techniques of pattern recognition.
  • Photonics has become a mature field of quantum information science, where integrated optical circuits offer a way to scale the complexity of the setup as well as the dimensionality of the quantum state. On photonic chips, paths are the natural way to encode information. To distribute those high-dimensional quantum states over large distances, transverse spatial modes, like orbital angular momentum (OAM) possessing Laguerre Gauss modes, are favourable as flying information carriers. Here we demonstrate a quantum interface between these two vibrant photonic fields. We create three-dimensional path entanglement between two photons in a non-linear crystal and use a mode sorter as the quantum interface to transfer the entanglement to the OAM degree of freedom. Thus our results show a novel, flexible way to create high-dimensional spatial mode entanglement. Moreover, they pave the way to implement broad complex quantum networks where high-dimensionally entangled states could be distributed over distant photonic chips.
  • Single photons with helical phase structures may carry a quantized amount of orbital angular momentum (OAM) and their entanglement is important for quantum information science and fundamental tests of quantum theory. Because there is no theoretical upper limit on how many quanta of OAM a single photon can carry, it is possible to create entanglement between two particles with an arbitrary high difference in the quantum number. By transferring polarization entanglement to OAM with an interferometric scheme, we generate and verify entanglement up to 600 quanta difference in the orbital angular momentum. The only restrictive factors towards higher numbers are current technical limitations. We also experimentally demonstrate that the entanglement of very high OAM can improve the sensitivity of the angular resolution in remote sensing.